Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: samuel

  • 346 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • Gullivers Travels By Jonathan Swift And The History Of Rasselas, Prince Of Abissinia By Samuel Johnson - 1,168 words
    GulliverS Travels By Jonathan Swift And The History Of Rasselas, Prince Of Abissinia By Samuel Johnson Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift and The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia by Samuel Johnson, seek to capture the nature of the ideal world as well as the essence of human nature. Both works are satirical in temper, and take a rather grim look at the human condition exists, as well as the attributes that compose it. Neither author is praising human nature, rather both novels conclude similarly that the perfect world is simply unattainable and completely out of the grasp of human reach. Swift and Johnson both present their own idea of what the ideal world is. Yet despite several s ...
    Related: gulliver's travels, gullivers travels, history, johnson, jonathan, jonathan swift, prince
  • Samuel Becketts In Waiting For Godot - 575 words
    Samuel Beckett's In Waiting For Godot Reading a work of literature often makes a reader experience certain feelings. These feeling differ with the content of the work, and are usually needed to perceive the author's ideas in the work. For example, Samuel Beckett augments a reader's understanding of Waiting For Godot by conveying a mood, (one which the characters in the play experience), to the reader. Similarly, a dominant mood is thrust upon a reader in Beowulf. These moods which are conveyed aid the author in conveying ideas to a reader. In Waiting for Godot, Beckett uses many pauses, silences, and ellipses (three dots (...) used to create a break in speech) to express a feeling of waiting ...
    Related: godot, samuel, samuel beckett, waiting for godot, the narrator
  • Samuel Becketts Waiting For Godot - 1,246 words
    Samuel BeckettS Waiting For Godot "Nothing to be done," is one of the many phrases that is repeated again and again throughout Samuel Beckett's Waiting For Godot. Godot is an existentialist play that reads like somewhat of a language poem. That is to say, Beckett is not interested in the reader interpreting his words, but simply listening to the words and viewing the actions of his perfectly mismatched characters. Beckett uses the standard Vaudevillian style to present a play that savors of the human condition. He repeats phrases, ideas and actions that has his audience come away with many different ideas about who we are and how beautiful our human existence is even in our desperation. The ...
    Related: godot, samuel, samuel beckett, waiting for godot, human existence
  • Samuel Clemens As Mark Twain - 1,076 words
    Samuel Clemens As Mark Twain Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835-1910), American writer and humorist, whose best work is characterized by broad, often irreverent humor or biting social satire. Twain's writing is also known for realism of place and language, memorable characters, and hatred of hypocrisy and oppression. Born in Florida, Missouri, Clemens moved with his family to Hannibal, Missouri, a port on the Mississippi River, when he was four years old. There he received a public school education. After the death of his father in 1847, Clemens was apprenticed to two Hannibal printers, and in 1851 he began setting type for and contributing sketches to his brother Orion's Hannibal Journal. Subse ...
    Related: clemens, langhorne clemens, mark, mark twain, samuel, samuel clemens, samuel langhorne clemens
  • Samuel Clemens Works - 1,727 words
    Samuel Clemens Works "Heaven and Hell and sunset and rainbows and the aurora all fused into on divine harmony . . . " It is by the goodness of God that in out country we have those three unspeakable precious things: freedom of speech, freedom of conscience, and the prudence never to practice either of them. Samuel Clemens' profound response to beauty was immediately and untrammeled-the beauty of nature, for which no special training is necessary for appreciation. The quote above supports the idea that Samuel Clemens was a literary artist, possibly America's greatest. Yet, he was definitely not just a writer. He wrote many novels that became American classics. Many of Clemens' greatest works ...
    Related: clemens, langhorne clemens, samuel, samuel clemens, samuel langhorne clemens
  • Samuel Clemens Works - 1,757 words
    ... e forty-five "princesses" held captive in "a castle" by "three ogres." Safely back in Camelot, Hank decides that the time has now come to impose upon Britain the technology he had been nurturing over the years. He determines "to destroy knight-errantry or be its victim"- which hardly seems generous of him, since he now owes his life to the fidelity of te same knights he has vowed to destroy. He enters a tournament and shoots his knightly foe dead with a revolver. He thereupon dares "the chivalry of England to come against him- not by individual, but in mass!" Hundreds of knights promptly accept this challenge, but they break ranks and flee after Hank quickly shoots nine more men dead. Si ...
    Related: clemens, samuel, samuel clemens, jay gould, hank morgan
  • Samuel De Champlain - 492 words
    Samuel de Champlain (1567 - 1635 ) Samuel de Champlain was born in the town of Bouage , France in the year of 1567. His father was a sea captain and as a boy he learned seamanship aswell as navigation. For a while he was in the army of King Henry IV then in 1599 he became the captain of a ship . For over two years he explored in the West Indies aswell as Mexico and visited all the major ports. When he later wrote about his adventures on this trip he suggested the idea of making a canal across Central America to shorten the trip the Southern Pacific Ocean. Many years later other people had the same idea. Samuel de Champlain made his first voyage to Canadian 1603 and explored the St. Lawrence ...
    Related: samuel, henry iv, nova scotia, pacific ocean, promoting
  • Samuel Houston - 1,072 words
    Samuel Houston Sam Houston was as legend reports a big man about six foot and six inches tall. He was an exciting historical figure and war hero who was involved with much of the early development of our country and Texas. He was a soldier, lawyer, politician, businessman, and family man, whose name will be synonymous with nation heroes who played a vital part in the shaping of a young and prosperous country. He admired and supported the Native Americans who took him in and adopted him into their culture to help bridge the gap between the government and a noble forgotten race. Sam Houston succeeded in many roles he donned as a man, but the one most remembered is the one of a true American he ...
    Related: houston, sam houston, samuel, cherokee nation, house of representatives
  • Samuel Houston - 1,085 words
    ... s imprisoned. Houston returned to law and set up his practice in Nacogdoches where he joined the Roman Catholic Church as required by Mexican law. Houston returned east, to Washington, D.C. and then New York City, to meet with his legal client, The Galveston Bay and Texas Land Company. Houston was soon named Commander-in-Chief by the Nacogdoches Committee of Vigilance. The Texas Provisional Government, on the motion of Merriweather W. Smith, named Sam Houston a Major General in the Texas Army. On January 14, 1836, Houston addresses his troops at Goliad and orders Jim Bowie to return to San Antonio and blow up the Alamo. Houston was granted a furlough from the army to travel to an Indian ...
    Related: houston, sam houston, samuel, republic of texas, union party
  • Samuel Langhorne Clemens, Also Know As Mark Twain, Was Born In 1835 And Died In 1910 He Is Best Known As An American Humorist - 1,615 words
    Samuel Langhorne Clemens, also know as Mark Twain, was born in 1835 and died in 1910. He is best known as an American humorist and for his realistic view of America in the nineteenth century through his novels and other stories. He had the whole world captivated through his expert writing and lectures. I never let my schooling interfere with my education (home.eathlink.net//twain.html), Mark Twain once said. Mark Twain was a great inspiration to America in the nineteenth century and is still an inspiration to contemporary writers today. Mark Twain was born as Samuel Langhorne Clemens in the small town of Florida, Missouri. He lived in a small, two-bedroom house, and being the fourth of five ...
    Related: american, american author, american classic, american hero, american literature, american style, great american
  • The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn, By Samuel Clemens, Also Known As Mark Twain, Is Probably One Of The Greatest Works Of Ame - 1,639 words
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Samuel Clemens, also known as Mark Twain, is probably one of the greatest works of American literature ever written. Ernest Hemingway even said in his book The Green Hills of Africa, "All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn" (Zwick). However, since Twain published Huck Finn 112 years ago, it has been the subject of much criticism, mostly all unfair. The Concord, Ma, banned the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Public Library immediately after its publication in 1885. They said the book was "rough, course, and inelegant...The whole book suited more to the slums than to intelligent respectable people" (as quo ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, huckleberry, huckleberry finn, mark, mark twain, samuel, samuel clemens
  • The Alamo Samuel Fb Morse - 823 words
    The Alamo - Samuel F.B. Morse Samuel F. B. Morse Samuel Finley Breese Morse was born on April 27, 1791, in Charlestown, just outside of Boston, Massachusetts. His father was Jedidiah Morse, a well- respected pastor and a writer. His mother was Elizabeth Ann Breese. Samuels parents had high hopes for their oldest son. When he was seven, they sent him to Phillips Academy in Andover. Although he was clearly smart, Samuel as a student was disappointing. He spent most of his time goofing off and drawing. At Yale College, Morse was an unsure student, but his interests were lectures of the then newly developing subject of electricity, and painting miniature portraits. After college, Morse directed ...
    Related: alamo, morse, samuel, york university, national academy
  • The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner By Samuel Taylor Coleridge 1772 1834 - 1,736 words
    The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 - 1834) The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 - 1834) Type of Work: Lyrical fantasy ballad Setting A sailing ship traveling the seas; late Medieval period Principal Characters The Ancient Mariner, a sailor-storyteller The Wedding Guest, a listener The Ship's Crew The Allbatross, a symbolic representation of God's creatures - and Man's guilt The Hermit, a rescuer representing God Story Overveiw (Coleridge introduces his tale by describing an old gray-headed sailor who approaches three young men headed for a wedding celebration and compels one of them, the groom's next-of-kin, to hear his story. O Weddi ...
    Related: ancient mariner, coleridge, mariner, rime, rime of the ancient mariner, samuel, samuel taylor coleridge
  • Waiting For Godot: Samuel Becketts Theatre Of The Absurd - 1,069 words
    Waiting for Godot: Samuel Beckett's Theatre of the Absurd Last November, I had the opportunity to view a New York City production of Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot. Unfamiliar with the genre of "Theatre of the Absurd," I spent the first 99% of the show trying to understand what was materializing on stage. It was not until the conclusion of the second act that I fully understood that nothing was happening, and that was the purpose of the play. Giving me an overall expression of the hopelessness of the human condition, Waiting for Godot, through plot, parallelism, characterization, and suicide to alleviate suffering, is a definitive example of "Theatre of the Absurd." In Theatre of the Abs ...
    Related: absurd, samuel, samuel beckett, theatre, waiting for godot
  • Waiting For Godot: Samuel Becketts Theatre Of The Absurd - 1,082 words
    ... the expectation of Estragon and Vladimir (SGSB, 44). Characterization is another tool implemented to the end of absurdism. The quarreling couple, Vladimir and Estragon have complementary personalities. Vladimir is more masculine or Apollonian: practical, persistent, serious and strong. Estragon is more feminine or Dionysian: a poet, volatile, dreaming, skeptical and weak. At times, through their incessant bickering, it is suggested that they disunite. Yet it is the differences in their natures that make them highly compatible, to the point that one is incomplete without the other. Beaten up by mysterious strangers every night, Estragon is protected by Vladimir who sings him to sleep with ...
    Related: absurd, samuel, samuel beckett, theatre, waiting for godot
  • A Comparison Of Coleridge's Rationalism To Wordsworth's Liberalism - 1,720 words
    A Comparison Of Coleridge'S Rationalism To Wordsworth'S Liberalism All friendships grow and nurture each other through time. The friendship between Coleridge and Wordsworth allowed for a special relationship of both criticism and admiration to develop. As their friendship matured, they would play important roles in each other's works, culminating in their joint publication of Lyrical Ballads, which is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period and be a combination of their best works. Despite their basic differences in poetic styles and philosophical beliefs, they would help each other create numerous works renown for their depth and creativity. Coleridge was a reserved dreamer, a tru ...
    Related: comparison, liberalism, rationalism, young boy, samuel taylor coleridge
  • A Dark Moment In Time - 830 words
    A Dark Moment in Time The book, The Crucible by Arthur Miller, is a well-written drama of how scapegoating gone to the extreme can bring about tremendous contention and chaos even among the simplest of people. In this case, the victims of scapegoating were the citizens of Salem, Massachusetts. I feel that Miller did an excellent job on the way in which he conveyed the setting, characters, and plot. The story takes place in Salem, Massachusetts in 1692. In their society there is only black and white, right and wrong. Given that the era is the 1600's we know that their lives weren't very complex back then. The people back then mainly farmed and worked from sun up till sun down. Therefore we kn ...
    Related: work cited, arthur miller, john proctor, massachusetts, embarrassment
  • A Holy Nation - 1,915 words
    A Holy Nation A Holy Nation After creating the world, a paradise for human kind, God is forced to banish Adam and Eve because they disobey His orders to not eat fruit from the tree of wisdom. This results ultimately in the fall of man to earth. Immediately from the beginning of his time on Earth, man chooses not to follow the path set before him by God but instead spreads evil throughout the world. Therefore, the inherent problem humans face is the pressure to judge between good and evil, the need to aspire to be like God. God's first solution to this problem was to flood the world killing everyone, but those on Noah's arch. God realizes, however, that this is not an answer to the problem th ...
    Related: holy, men and women, growing old, good and evil, pivotal
  • A More Perfect Union: - 1,022 words
    ... e power to regulate trade, the southern states would be nothing more than overseers for the Northern States. On August 21 the debate over the issue of commerce became very closely linked to another explosive issue--slavery. When Martin of Maryland proposed a tax on slave importation, the convention was thrust into a strident discussion of the institution of slavery and its moral and economic relationship to the new government. Rutledge of South Carolina, asserting that slavery had nothing at all to do with morality, declared, Interest alone is the governing principle with nations. Sherman of Connecticut was for dropping the tender issue altogether before it jeopardized the convention. Ma ...
    Related: more perfect union, articles of confederation, bill of rights, northern states, mason
  • A Myriad Of Mysteries Is Contained In The Pages Of The Old Testament For Centuries, Scholars Of Theology, Archeology And Anth - 1,419 words
    A myriad of mysteries is contained in the pages of the Old Testament. For centuries, scholars of theology, archeology and anthropology have labored to produce some explanation of the contradictions and impossibilities put forth in these texts. The ancient ruins of lost cities reveal evidence that some writings may be incorrectly dated, or even that they may be false. Faith and tradition give way to speculation that the Bible may be nothing more than a collection of ancient Israelite mythology. Some things, however, prove tantalizingly true. Temple Judaism and its monarchy, for example, are historical fact; the records of surrounding civilizations corroborate the chronicling of their place in ...
    Related: anth, archeology, myriad, pages, testament
  • 346 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>

To the top

Example research papers produced by our company:

We write: custom term papers, custom essay writing, admission essays, persuasive and argumentative essays, critical essays, dissertations and theses

Research paper topics, free essays: urine, redesigning, husserl, sole, pasadena, etc.

Copyright © 2002-2017 PromptPapers.com. All rights reserved.