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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: royal family

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  • Alexander The Great - 5,120 words
    Alexander The Great Alexander III, more commonly known as Alexander the Great, was one of the greatest military leaders in world history. He was born in Pella, Macedonia, then a Greek nation. The exact date of his birth is uncertain, but was probably either July 20 or 26, 356 B.C. Alexander was considered a child from his birth until 341 B.C. His princehood lasted from 340 to 336 B.C. In 336 B.C. Philip II, his father, was assassinated, thus making Alexander king. Alexander became a military leader in 335, and remained one until his death in 323 B.C. He reigned from 336 B.C. until 323 B.C., when he died. His military campaign in Persia lasted from 334 to 329, and in 328 he began his campaign ...
    Related: alexander, alexander the great, great alexander, king alexander, asia minor
  • Alexander The Great - 5,132 words
    ... 120 and the minimum 60. After the Battle 25 Macedonians fell"in the first charge. Alexander had a statue made of each of them. He then erected each statue somewhere near Granicus. He also erected a statue of himself, although he did not even die, let alone in first charge. This was a strange gesture that would never be repeated again. 2,000 of Memnon's mercenaries survived. After the battle they were chained like lions and sent back to forced labor, probably in the mines. This was not a very placatory gesture by Alexander. The reason he gave for it was that "they had violated Greek public opinion by fighting with the Orientals against the Greeks." After his victory, Alexander went across ...
    Related: alexander, alexander the great, great world, north east, indus river
  • Alexei Nicholaevich Romanov - 820 words
    Alexei Nicholaevich Romanov Adam Mitchell 2/6/01 A)1904-1910 Alexei Nicholaevich Romanov was born the youngest of four daughters. To Nicholas Romanov the second, and Alexandra Feodorovna Romanov. He was to be the Tsar of Russia. When he was born he was diagnosed with hemophilia a disease which with one cut could be fatal for you bleed a lot. This disease had been in the family for a long time. Anytime Alexei would feel ill Grigorri Rasbutin would be summoned to the palace to cure Alexei and he always did. As a child he often attended balls and attend formal functions with his family. Occasionally he would get to act as the Tsarvich. All other times he was usually in bed suffering excruciatin ...
    Related: alexei, after world, royal family, world war 1, bleeding
  • Amenhotep Iv - 2,420 words
    ... man who enjoys intellectual pleasures over traditional manly pleasures such as hunting. A young man who may not be strong and sure of himself as ruler. Yet there are those around him, priests of Amen, who are strong politically and financially and wish to stay that way. No matter who is in power. Will this situation have an affect on the reign of Akhenaten? His first few years show no great revolutionary intentions. He makes his sister Nefertity his queen. Like his mother, his queen is a strong and influential woman. She appears almost trice as many times as her husband in the talatats. And she is seen holding a sword or club. We will discuss the role of Akhenaten and his family life lat ...
    Related: amenhotep, different types, state policy, foreign affairs, goddess
  • Ancient Civilization - 1,498 words
    Ancient Civilization Describe Paleolithic and Neolithic cultures. What were the main characteristics of each? The Paleolithic Old Stone era began in about 40,000 - 10,000 B. C. The beginning of this period was marked by the first human hunter-gatherer societies. Hunting, fishing, and gathering of fruits and nuts were the main economic endeavors at the time. The responsibilities in these hunter-gathering societies were shared. The men of this period did the very dangerous hunting of large wild animals like bison and reindeer, while women gatherer fruits and nuts for an entire year. The small communities of 25-50 people came to consensus on decisions and ideas were shared. The extended family ...
    Related: civilization, epic of gilgamesh, men and women, religion & politics, irrigation
  • Andalgoda And Mirabai - 1,559 words
    Andal-Goda And Mirabai Poetry, Passion, and Power: The Lyrics of Andal-Goda and the Music of Goda Mandali, Vasudha Narayanan & Mirabai: Inscribed in Text, Embodied in Life, Nancy M. Martin-Kershaw This is a summary and reaction to the above articles, both of which have similar foci in that they each discuss different female Hindu saints. These Saints, though women, have life histories that do not exactly fit into the prescribed gender roles of current modern India. Interestingly, in an India where men dominate and female virtue is based on passivity and sacrifice for one's husband, these holy women, who never married (officially) and show no sign of passivity, are widely excepted and widely ...
    Related: women in india, role model, indian society, diversity, justification
  • Aristocracy In Britain - 981 words
    Aristocracy In Britain There was an argument going on in the Hudson Palace. The huge windows were shaking, the maids were running, trying to find a place to hide, the extravagant and expensive paintings by famous artists were about to fall on the red famous Iran rugs, because of Princess Danielles ear-blursting voice. I want another bodyguard!, Danielle said. But darling you already have twenty-five bodyguards, just for fun, your passion or desire whatever. They have little work to do and cost a big load of money to keep. , said Sir Alexander. But Alex darling, Countess Daphne has thirty and she is only a Countess. However I am the Princess of Wales and a member of the royal family. She does ...
    Related: aristocracy, britain, brad pitt, royal family, hollywood
  • As The Reformation Swept Through Europe, Changing Religious Ideas Affected The - 948 words
    As the Reformation swept through Europe, changing religious ideas affected the political spectrum of Europe as well. The teachings of Jean Calvin took root in France, especially in the southern regions. This clashed with groups of staunch Catholics. Great amounts of people, including many of the nobility, converted to Calvinism, and they were known as Huguenots. These people clashed violently with the loyal Catholic contingency of the population. This religious strife was also heightened by political instability. With the reign of Francois I, the power of the king expanded. This shook the ingrained balance of power between the nobles and the king. Beforehand, the king relied mainly on the no ...
    Related: reformation, religious toleration, edict of nantes, political spectrum, solid
  • Bahrain - 1,422 words
    ... are some of the most noticeable aspects of society. Education The Ministry of Education in Bahrain is the official authority for running and administering the governmental educational institutions and supervising private education. The Ministry mission is represented in ensuring education for all, and improving its quality and standard to meet the learners, the national development requirements and the labor market needs. It will ultimately develop the integrated-balanced personality of the Bahrain good citizen who is able to think and has belief in the Islamic faith and belonging to the Arab nation and international family. As directed by the political leadership, the Ministry of Educat ...
    Related: bahrain, financial capital, banking sector, financial sector, confronting
  • Beatlemania In The 1960s - 1,627 words
    Beatlemania in the 1960s The Beatles were a mystical happening that many people still don't understand. Phenomenoligists had a ball in 1964 with Beatlemania, a generally harmless form of madness which came from Britain in 1963. The sole cause of Beatlemania is a quartet of young Englishmen known as the Beatles. In the less than one year that they achieved popularity in England to the time they came to America, The Beatles achieved a popularity and following that is unprecedented in the history of show business in England. They became the first recording artists anywhere in the world to have a record become a million-seller before it's release. They became the target of such adoration by thei ...
    Related: the girl, middle class, medical ethics, seller, invasion
  • Beatlemania In The 1960s - 1,628 words
    Beatlemania in the 1960s The Beatles were a mystical happening that many people still don't underezd. Phenomenoligists had a ball in 1964 with Beatlemania, a generally harmless form of madness which came from Britain in 1963. The sole cause of Beatlemania is a quartet of young Englishmen known as the Beatles. In the less than one year that they achieved popularity in England to the time they came to America, The Beatles achieved a popularity and following that is unprecedented in the history of show business in England. They became the first recording artists anywhere in the world to have a record become a million-seller before it's release. They became the target of such adoration by their ...
    Related: popular culture, rockefeller center, the girl, editorial, beethoven
  • Beowulf - 575 words
    Beowulf Timeless Heroes Beowulf was written in the eighth century by an unknown author. The story is centered on Beowulf, the main character, who is able to use his super-human physical strength and courage to put his people before himself. He encounters hideous monsters but never fears the threat of death. Beowulf is the ultimate hero who risks his life countless times for immortal glory and for the good of others. Another fictional hero who possessed these qualities is He-Man, a nineteen eighties cartoon super hero. Their backgrounds, their trusted friends, and their super human strength make them epic heroes of their time. The quality that makes them heroes is the deep respect and respons ...
    Related: beowulf, main character, grendel's mother, royal family, countless
  • Bosnia - 1,278 words
    Bosnia annon The origin of the arms with the argent between 6 fleur-de-lys, which is now on the flag of the republic of Bosnia-Hercegovina, has long puzzled me, but they are in fact the arms of the Kotromanic family, which ruled Bosnia in the 14th and 1 5th centuries. Other arms have also been attributed to Bosnia in the 19th century. I finally thought of a way to get at this question of the origin of the current Bosnian flag: numismatics, of course. I found a book by one Ivan Rengjeo, Corpus der mittel-alterlichen Mnzen von Kroatien, Slavonien, Dalmatien und Bosnien, Graz, 1959, which is as exhaustive as you can get on the topic (coins from those regions, that is). I have also consulted an ...
    Related: bosnia, royal family, roman empire, holy roman empire, arts
  • Buddhism - 1,081 words
    Buddhism Buddhism is a religion and philosophy founded by Siddhartha Gautama in northeast India during the period from the late 6th century to the early 4th century BC. Spreading from India to Central and Southeast Asia, China, Korea, and Japan, Buddhism has played an influential role in the spiritual, cultural, and social life of much of the Eastern world. The Buddha, which means the "Enlightened One," died in northeastern India between 500 and 350 BC. According to tradition, his family name was Gautama; later sources call him Siddhartha, which means "He Who Has Reached His Goal." He was reared in a minor royal family of the ruling Kshatriya, or warrior, caste. Shocked as a young man after ...
    Related: buddhism, tantric buddhism, zen buddhism, central asia, noble eightfold path
  • Bulimia - 495 words
    Bulimia Bulimia effects many people. For instance, Princess Diana was a bulimic. She was always trying to lose weight and keep it off because the Royal Family told her she was chubby. So she would go on binges (eating large quantities of rich, yummy foods) and then disappear to the bathroom. Eventually she became very ill, and was treated at a hospital. Later on after she had recovered, she spoke at benefits, on behalf of other bulimics. Bulimia is a serious eating disorder that destroys the victims body, and can be extremely difficult to detect and treat. Being bulimic means that you eat large quantities of food and then you go puke it up, so you dont gain weight. The cause of bulimia is no ...
    Related: bulimia, lose weight, self esteem, body image, insomnia
  • Business Strategies - 539 words
    Business Strategies In chapter seventeen several topics for debate are presented about managing global operations. For many global organizations, or organizations that produce or sells goods or services in more than one country, a difficult question is how to develop and place managers in foreign operations. Some people believe organizations should let foreign managers run foreign subsidiaries because of the large differences among national cultures while others believe that domestic managers should be trained to run foreign subsidiaries because of loyalty issues. Nation culture is the particular set of economic, political, and social values that exist in a particular nation. This culture ef ...
    Related: business strategies, exchange rates, highly effective, best choice, promoting
  • Caskets Of Fortune - 1,119 words
    Caskets Of Fortune Caskets of Fortune Word is spread, a fair maiden awaits suiters to challenge the puzzle to win her hand and marriage, and in wealth. Her father has passed away, leaving her with only a memory of him, and more dumbfounded suiters come and challenge to see if they really are the one to inherit the fortune. There are three caskets, First of gold, who this inscription bears: Who Chooseth me shall gain what many men desire, The second silver, which this promise carries: Who Chooseth me shall get as much as he deserves. This third dull lead, with warning all as blunt: Who Chooseth me must give and hazard all he hath. The suiters are The Prince of Morocco, a self absorbed sponge, ...
    Related: fortune, royal family, real world, the prince, idiot
  • Comparisons Of Greek And Oceanic Mythology - 1,363 words
    Comparisons Of Greek And Oceanic Mythology Jeff Cressy Cressy1 The purpose of myths is to answer questions, to educate, and to entertain. How was man created? Why does the earth do the things it does? Cultures all throughout the ancient world tried to answer these questions in the form of myth. In Greece, Australia, and New Zealand, ancient storytellers created unique stories that entertained taught values and helped explain their worlds. Even though the people of these countries were separated by thousands of miles, there are an astonishing amount of similarities between their myths. While the inhabitants of these regions may have looked totally different from each other, their myths showed ...
    Related: greek, greek myth, greek mythology, mythology, oceanic, world mythology
  • Egyptian Religous Reforms - 1,377 words
    ... is name to, brought about many religious reforms. Amenhotep IV began a series of reforms to ensure the Pharaoh's status as a living god among the people, as opposed to a simple agent of the sun-god Amen-Re, as the priests of the royal court were beginning to assert a more powerful and independent role. Assisted by the royal family, Amenhotep IV commenced on a series of religious reforms, which would help him regain the power lost to the priests. He worshiped Aten, the radiant god of the sun disk. Why this particular god Aten was chosen may never be known, But Amenhotep IV apparently so inspired by his faith that he wrote The Hymn to the Aten in his praise. At first he tolerated worship o ...
    Related: egyptian, egyptian culture, moral philosophy, religion & politics, nile
  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,705 words
    ... ion that was to last for 400 years. William was a hard ruler, punishing England, especially the north, when it disputed his authority. His power and efficiency can be seen in the Domesday Survey, a census for tax purposes, and in the Salisbury Oath of allegiance, which he demanded of all tenants. He appointed Lanfranc, an Italian clergyman, as archbishop of Canterbury. He also promoted church reform, especially by the creation of separate church courts, but retained royal control. When William died in 1087, he gave England to his second son, William II (Rufus), and Normandy to his eldest son, Robert. Henry, his third son, in due time got bothEngland in 1100, when William II died in a hun ...
    Related: bank of england, church of england, division, great britain, great schism, latin, political ideas
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