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  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desire - 4,340 words
    Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams, including A Streetcar Named Desire (1947, film, 1951) and Death of a Salesman (1949). He directed the Academy Award-winning films Gentleman's Agreement (1947) and On The Waterfront (1954), as well as East of Eden (1955), A Face in the Crowd (1957), Splendor in the Grass (1961), and The Last Tycoon (1976). His two autobiographical novels, America, America (1962) and The Arrangement (1967), were turned into films in 1963 and 1968. Bibliography: Koszarski, Richard, Hollywood Directors, 1941-1976 (1977). Jolson, Al -------------------------------- (johl'-suhn) The singer Al Jolson, b. Asa Yoelson in Lithuania, c.1886, d. Oct. 23, 1950, immigrated with his fa ...
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  • Benjamin Banneker Was One The Bestknown Black People In Early United States History He Was An Astronomer, Farmer, Mathematici - 361 words
    Benjamin Banneker was one the best-known black people in early United States history. He was an astronomer, farmer, mathematician and surveyor. He contributed greatly to the rise of African Americans in science. Benjamin Banneker was born in 1731 near Baltimore. His grandmother, an Englishwoman, taught him how to read and write. For many year he attended a small school open to blacks and whites. There he developed an interest in mathematics and science. Later, while farming, he pursued his mathematical studies and taught himself astronomy. In 1753 he completed a clock built entirely of wood. He carved each gear by hand. His only models were a pocket watch and a picture of a clock. The clock ...
    Related: african american history, american history, benjamin, black people, history, secretary of state, states history
  • Braque - 995 words
    ... ing point of his career. The events which conspired during WWI and the years that followed boosted Picassos Popularity while diminished Braques.(Frank,18) At this point in history, 1914, Braque left the art scene to fight in the war. He entered the army as an infantry sergeant and served with distinction, being decorated twice in 1914 for bravery. In 1915 he suffered a serious head wound, which was followed by a trepanation, several months in the hospital, and a long period of convalescence at home at Sorgues. During this period he added to the aphorisms he had been in the habit of scribbling on the margins of drawings, and in 1917 a collection of these sayings, put together by his frien ...
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  • Braque, The Fogotten Cubist Master - 998 words
    ... turning point of his career. The events which conspired during WWI and the years that followed boosted Picasso's Popularity while diminished Braque's.(Frank,18) At this point in history, 1914, Braque left the art scene to fight in the war. He entered the army as an infantry sergeant and served with distinction, being decorated twice in 1914 for bravery. In 1915 he suffered a serious head wound, which was followed by a trepanation, several months in the hospital, and a long period of convalescence at home at Sorgues. During this period he added to the aphorisms he had been in the habit of scribbling on the margins of drawings, and in 1917 a collection of these sayings, put together by his ...
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  • Devepopment Of Modern Science In Europe - 1,219 words
    ... nt funds scientists, like the ones at Gresham College, could make great strives in improving the lives of the population and making the nation powerful and rich. Gresham College in London, England was an institution funded by Sir Thomas Gresham, which had close ties with the Royal Navy. Many instruments were developed there which aided in accurate time keeping and observation of the stars, which was so critical in ocean navigation. Instruments such as a newer telescope, the thermometer, the microscope, the pendulum clock, the barometer and the air pump. These instruments not only helped England become a great sea power, by enabling ships to travel farther and return safely, but gave the ...
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  • During The Victorian Era - 1,688 words
    During The Victorian Era Characteristics During the Victorian Era When imagining the Victorian Age, royalty, fancy lifestyles, and elaborate living often come to mind. However, during this same era, other lifestyles and conditions of a completely different nature were occurring. Many of the English people lived in poverty. Charles Dickens, one of the great writers of this period, described how it was to live during the Victorian Era. Although England grew from an agricultural to an industrial society, not all citizens benefited from this change. In addition, the undesirable health and medical environment plagued both the wealthy and the poor. Charles Dickens was a profound British writer who ...
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  • Expressionism Is A Much Less Important Current In Sculpture Than In Painting, Since The Ethnographic Sculpture By The Fauves - 1,580 words
    Expressionism is a much less important current in sculpture than in painting, since the ethnographic sculpture by the Fauves might have evoked a strong response among sculptors Only one important sculptor shared in this rediscovery Brancusi, a Rumanian, moved to Paris to study advanced art around 1904 But he was more interested in the formal simplicity and coherence of primitive carvings than in their savage expressiveness; this is evidenced in The Kiss which was executed in 1909 Brancusi had a 'genius of ommission' - to Brancusi a monument is an upright slab, symmetrical and immobile - a permanent marker like the styles of the ancients and he disturbed the basic shape as little as possible ...
    Related: ethnographic, expressionism, modern sculpture, sculpture, african culture
  • Francisco Jos Goya Y Lucientes - 1,216 words
    Francisco Jos Goya y Lucientes Born on March 30, 1746, in Aragon province of Spain. The reason for this mans two last names is that it is a Spanish custom to take on both parents last names to make a combination for their own, his fathers last name was Goya and his mothers, Lucientes, but he is most widely known by the name Goya. He lived in a very common family of the time, he worked as a gilder for a short while with his father in the town he was born in, Fuendetodos. But due to the economical needs of his family, Goya was sent to the fields and he suffered through long days of manual labor to make ends meet. In Goyas adolescence, his family moved to Zaragoza because his father wanted a be ...
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  • Goya - 548 words
    Goya Francisco Jose de Goya y Lucientes was born on March 30, 1746, in Fuendetodos, a village in northern Spain. The family later moved to Saragossa, where Goya's father worked as a gilder. At fourteen years old, Goya was apprenticed to Jose Luzan, a local painter. Later he went to Italy to continue his study of art. On returning to Saragossa in 1771, he painted frescoes for the local cathedral. These works, done in the decorative rococo tradition, established Goya's artistic reputation. In 1773 he married Josefa Bayeu, sister of Saragossa artist Francisco Bayeu. The couple had many children, but only one--a son, Xavier--survived to adulthood. From 1775 to 1792 Goya painted cartoons (designs ...
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  • Homer Winslow And Jules Breton - 1,719 words
    Homer Winslow And Jules Breton Homer Winslow and Jules Breton, two men painting the canvas of the nineteenth century. Comparing their art gives birth to numerous differences and unique qualities hidden within their work and lives. Dressing For The Carnival, Homer 1877, and The Weeders, Breton 1868, are fine examples of their careers as artists. Beyond the aesthetic merits of his work, Breton is significant as the painter whose vision of French rural life best embodies a set of late nineteenth- century ideals: the charm and wholesomeness of rustic ways, the nobility of living close to the soil, the beauty of preindustrial landscape, and the social harmony of the agrarian community. ( Sturges) ...
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  • John Constable - 1,673 words
    John Constable What made Constable different from the majority of his contemporaries was his attitude towards the things that he saw. He was not, like so many other landscape artists, a conscious seeker of the picturesque. As an artist he was virtually self-taught and his periods of formal study amounted to little more than process of directive discipline. His real master was his own sensitive and perceptive eye (Peacock, 15). It was through a study of nature rather than by a study of academic principles that his artistic philosophy was evolved. It was at East Bergholt on the Suffolk side of the river Stour on 11 June 1776 that artist John Constable was born. The house where John was born is ...
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  • Life Of Picasso - 1,074 words
    Life Of Picasso Art represents beauty. It represents the soul and spirit of the artist. It's a form of communication that the artist can use as a substitution for words. Art has flourished the world for thousands of years and it has no intentions on stopping. One of the most important figure's in modern art (Selfridge, 15) is a man by the name of Pablo Picasso. He has taken the world into many places and has enabled us to see many abstract creations through his artwork alone. (Selfridge, 20) Born on October 25, 1881, Picasso was a miracle right from the start. There were complications with birth and everyone was sure that he wasn't going to make it, but then Picasso's uncle, Salvador Ruiz, w ...
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  • Life Of Picasso - 1,015 words
    ... ado Museum, and to paint a mural for the Spanish Pavilion at the Paris World's Fair. He accepted the offer and the work he completed were called Guernica. (Dunkun, 169) During this time the Nazi party began to take over. The Germans harassed Picasso by taking his paintings and damaging some of them pretty badly. The Nazi party prohibited the work of Picasso to be exhibited anywhere. Things didn't get any better for Picasso for a while, and he had to see a number of friends incarcerated. (Galwitz, 153) Paris was finally free from the harassment when it was liberated from the Germans. About a month after this happened, Picasso joined the Communist party. He met a painter named Francoise Gi ...
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  • Marijuana - 1,289 words
    Marijuana Marijuana is a green, brown, or gray mixture of dried, shredded flowers and leaves of the hemp plant, Cannabis sativa. Marijuana is often called by street names such as pot, herb, weed, boom, Mary Jane, gangster, reefer, or chronic. There are more than 200 slang terms for marijuana. HISTORY: Cannabis was acknowledged as early as 2,700 BC in Chinese manuscripts. Marijuana has been used as a medicine throughout the world since the beginning of written history. During this time, companies such as Lilly, Parke Daivis, Tildens, Squibb, and other major drug manufacturers, have made everything from sleeping elixirs, to stomach medicine from marijuana. These drugs were even knowingly presc ...
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  • Pablo Picasso - 384 words
    Pablo Picasso Pablo R. Picasso is generally considered in his technical virtuosity, enormous versatility, and incredible originality and prolifically to have been the foremost figure in 20th-century art. Pablo Picasso delivered at 11:15 P.M. in Malaga, a city in southern Spain, on October 25, 1881. He almost died at birth. If it had not been for the presence of his uncle, Dr. Salvador Ruiz, the infant might never have came to life. He could not draw a breath, so his uncle blew cigar smoke into his face. It would be his first triumph over death. Picasso was the son of Jose Ruiz Blasco, an art teacher, and Maria Picasso y Lopez. Picasso was a genius at a very early age. Academically Picasso wa ...
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  • Venus Asleep Of Paul Delvaux - 1,386 words
    "Venus Asleep" Of Paul Delvaux Paul Delvaux (1897-1994) Venus Asleep 1. What Does the art work look like? describe it. This piece of art work in my opinion looks like a dream. The art work has a certain disoriented charm. It has mainly all dark colors and uses these dark colors to contrast with the light skin pigment of the people in the painting. The painting has a calm erotic nude lady sleeping on a very formal looking couch or day bed. If the picture is read as this ladies dream then it appears as if she were dreaming of death or something of a cult like manner. If it is indeed death she is dreaming of then she is symbolizing that death is very calm and relaxed, for her leg has gone limp ...
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  • Vigee Le Brun - 1,251 words
    Vigee Le Brun Elizabeth-Louise Vigee-Le Brun is noted as a very prominent woman/artist in the World of the Eighteenth Century art. She is known for her work as a portrait painter. Her most famous works are included in the series that she had painted at age twenty-four of Queen Marie-Antoinette. Vigee-Le Brun was a woman of so many talents. Before she died at eighty-seven years old, she was an accomplished artist, exceptional musician, and a loving mother to her daughter Julie. Vigee-Le Brun was an unusually unattractive woman. She was charming and self-confident with an ability to present her sitters' personas most advantageously. Vigee-Le Brun was very reputable because she managed to keep ...
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  • Well When I Wrote Think I Encluded Pictures, Aparently They Do Not Cut And Paste Sorry If It Makes It Hard To Read - 1,818 words
    *****Well when I wrote think I encluded pictures, aparently they do not cut and paste. Sorry if it makes it hard to read. The Greatness that is Benjamin Franklin The First American A Printers Epitaph The Body of B. Franklin, Printer; Like the Cover of an old Book, Its Contents torn out, And stript of its Lettering and Gilding, Lies here, Food for Worms. But the Work shall not be wholly lost: For it will, as he believd, appear once more, In a new & more perfect Edition, Corrected and amended By the Author. He was born Jan. 6, 1706. Died 17- Composed by Franklin at twenty-two years of age. Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston Massachusetts, right around the time Puritanism died, whether he was ...
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  • William Blake And Romanticism - 691 words
    William Blake And Romanticism William Blake lived from 1757-1827. He based most of his works in the style of Romanticism. Much like William Wordsworth, Blake wrote from the heart, letting natural expression take over. Many of the writers of the Romantic period felt they had entered an imaginative climate, which some of them called "the Spirit Age." During this "Spirit Age," many authors felt that freedom and spontaneity were the key elements in poetry. Before this creative revolution, a poem was considered a classical work of art, assimilated to please an audience. In Romanticism, the "rules" hanging over poetry were dropped and a piece of work could become, as Blake described, "an embodimen ...
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  • William Turner - 462 words
    William Turner One of the finest landscape artists was J.M.W. Turner, whose work was exhibited when he was still a teenager. His entire life was devoted to his art. Unlike many artists of his era, he was successful throughout his career. Joseph Mallord William Turner was born in London, England, on April 23, 1775. His father was a barber. His mother died when he was very young. The boy received little schooling. His father taught him how to read, but this was the extent of his education except for the study of art. By the age of 13 he was making drawings at home and exhibiting them in his father's shop window for sale. Turner was 15 years old when he received a rare honor--one of his paintin ...
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