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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: basilica

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  • The Rotunda Plan Vs. The Basilica - 490 words
    Both the Rotunda and the Basilica plans were used in Early Christian Churches, but the styles are very different. The Basilica plan church is the simpler of the two. It is based on the Basilicas of the Greek and Roman cultures. The Early Christian Churches adapted the Greek and Roman design to suit their religious needs. They took the original rectangular plan and changed it to look like the Holy Cross by adding a transept. This is seen in the Early Christian Church of St. Apollinare, in Ravenna Italy. They added an atrium in front of the entrance to the church. The church still has columns, but they were on the inside, lining the nave, where the worshipers stood and today we sit. There were ...
    Related: basilica, early christian, holy cross, christian church, jesus
  • Biography On Michelangelo - 879 words
    Biography On Michelangelo "Trifles make perfections, and perfection is no trifle," Michelangelo once stated. He is one of the greatest artists of all time and is unmatched by any other. Michelangelo is the creator of works of sublime beauty that express the full breadth of human condition. Yet, he was caught between conflicting powers and whims of his patrons, the Medici's of Florence and Papacy's in Rome. Michelangelo was born on the sixth of March in 1475, the second of five brothers in a small town called Caprese, in Tuscany. He always considered himself to be a Florentine, as did his father. Francesca Neri, his mother, was sick and frail. As a result, he stayed with a nurse in a family o ...
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  • Christian And Byzantine Art - 722 words
    Christian And Byzantine Art Early Christian and Byzantine art started after Jesus death in the first century ranging and ending to the fourth century AD. The art produced during this period was secretive because Christianity was not a formal religion but as a cult; the Romans and rest of Europe persecuted Christians so the artist disguised their work with symbols and hints of Christian aspects. Christianity was the first cult to not involve rituals of sacrifice of animals and refused to worship an Emperor causing the Roman Empire to make Christianity illegal. Byzantine art excelled in the Justinian period in the east during 520-540 AD. The art was produced in Ravenna, Byzantine, Venice, Sici ...
    Related: byzantine, byzantine art, christian, christian art, early christian
  • Donatello - 1,312 words
    ... nt is seen on page thirteen, image seven. During this time it was tradition that Hoell 6 mercenary commanders were honored with equestrian portraits wither painted or sculpted in their memory (Poeschke p.398). Donatello was commissioned to make the statue. This work was one of the main reasons Donatello went to Padua. He was paid 1140 lire for this monument. His purpose was to make this stature more powerful and lifelike than any other equestrian he had seen before (Pope-Hennessy p.200, 202). The work was given the name Gattamelata that was Erasmos nickname meaning cunning cat. There were many delays to actually complete Gattamelata. Most of the work was done between 144-1450. Though, it ...
    Related: donatello, italian art, early renaissance, florence italy, location
  • Louis Xiv, The Sun King - 1,029 words
    Louis XIV, The Sun King Louis XIV, The Sun King Louis XIV was only four years old when he succeeded his father to the French throne. Often uncared for, he nearly drowned because no one was watching him as he played near a pond. This began to shape in his young mind an early fear of God. Louis' character was also shaped by the French Civil War. In this, the Paris Parlement rose against the crown. For five years, Louis would suffer fear, cold, hunger and other spirit-breaking events. He would never forgive Paris, the nobles, or the common people. Finally, in 1653, Cardinal Jules Mazarin was able to end the rebellion. He began to instruct Louis on his position as king. Even though Louis XIV was ...
    Related: king louis, king louis xiv, louis, louis xiv, holy roman
  • Martin Luther Lived From 14831546 Luther Was Born On November 10, 1483 In Eisleben In The Province Of Saxony His Protestant V - 1,218 words
    Martin Luther lived from 1483-1546. Luther was born on November 10, 1483 in Eisleben in the province of Saxony. His protestant view of Christianity started what was called the Protestant Reformation in Germany. Luther's intentions were to reform the medieval Roman Catholic Church. But firm resistance from the church towards Luther's challenge made way to a permanent division in the structure of Western Christianity. Luther lived in Mansfield and was the son of a miner. He later went on to study at Eisenbach and Magdeburg. After studying at these institutions he moved on to study at the University of Erfurt. Luther started out studying law, but then went on to enter the religious life. He wen ...
    Related: luther, martin, martin luther, protestant, protestant reformation, province
  • Martin Luther Protestant Reformation - 1,678 words
    ... received his priesthood. He was then sent to Wittenberg, where he held the professorship of moral philosophy for a year are so before returning to Efurt. Around 1512, Luther fell into a depression. He was plagued by the feeling that he was unable to fulfill God's wishes. But from this depression sprang illumination. Luther began to develop ideas which would eventually become the groundwork for Protestantism. He saw the theory of original sin and redemption for it as a selfish form of idolatry. He cited Paul's Epistle to Rome as showing God to be a beneficent creator filled with love, not condemnation. The forgiveness of sin wasn't a holy ritual which miraculously wiped away a person's si ...
    Related: counter reformation, luther, martin, martin luther, protestant, protestant reformation, reformation
  • Michelangelo - 438 words
    Michelangelo Michelangelo, the second of five brothers was born on March 6, 1475, at Caprese, in Tuscany, to Ludovico di Leonardo di Buonarotto Simoni and Francesca Neri. The same day, his father noted down: "Today March 6, 1475, a child of the male sex has been born to me and I have named him Michelangelo. He was born on Monday between 4 and 5 in the morning, at Caprese, where I am the Podest." When Michelangelo was a child, he met a boy, Francesco Granacci six years older than him, who was learning the art of painting in Ghirlandaio's studio, and Michelangelo found his own artist vocation. Michelangelo's father placed his 13-year-old son in the workshop of the painter Domenico Ghirlandaio. ...
    Related: michelangelo, michelangelo buonarroti, saint peter, famous works, tomb
  • Michelangelo Buonarrotti - 589 words
    Michelangelo Buonarrotti Michelangelo Michelangelo Buonarrotti, although considered by many a Florentine, was actually born in Caprese, Italy in 1475. Michelangelo was an inspired artist of the Renaissance period. He and Leonardo DaVinci were considered to be the two greatest figures of this highly artistic movement. Michelangelo was a highly versatile artist and was involved in sculpting, architecture, painting, and even poetry. .At the age of 13, he was apprenticed to Domenico Ghirlandaio, who at the time was painting a chapel in the church of Santa Maria Novella in Florence. Here, the young Michelangelo learned the technique of fresco (painting on fresh plaster before it dries); He would ...
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  • Michelangelo Was Pessimistic In His Poetry And An Optimist In His Artwork Michelangelos Artwork Consisted Of Paintings And Sc - 1,472 words
    Michelangelo was pessimistic in his poetry and an optimist in his artwork. Michelangelo's artwork consisted of paintings and sculptures that showed humanity in it's natural state. Michelangelo's poetry was pessimistic in his response to Strazzi even though he was complementing him. Michelangelo's sculpture brought out his optimism. Michelangelo was optimistic in completing The Tomb of Pope Julius II and persevered through it's many revisions trying to complete his vision. Sculpture was Michelangelo's main goal and the love of his life. Since his art portrayed both optimism and pessimism, Michelangelo was in touch with his positive and negative sides, showing that he had a great and stable pe ...
    Related: artwork, consisted, michelangelo, michelangelo buonarroti, optimist, pessimistic, poetry
  • Roman Architecture - 848 words
    Roman Architecture The architectural style of Rome was firmly rooted in the Hellenistic traditions. However, Roman architecture is probably more accurately reflected in the development of new engineering skills and secular monuments than the ideas of gods and perfection that birthed the Greek architecture. They introduced not only new ways to construct a more efficient building but also a entirely different purpose for the building to be built. While still holding the beauty that was so masterfully achieved by the Greek culture and adding their own practically and ingenuity, the Romans developed an architectural style that remains to this day. The Greeks people had a very good reason, in the ...
    Related: architecture, greek architecture, roman, roman architecture, roman civilization, roman culture
  • Roman Influence On Architecture - 919 words
    Roman Influence On Architecture Roman Influence on Architecture The world of architecture has been greatly influenced and affected by Roman architectural design and development. Their innovative designs and influential developments developed centuries ago have provided a basis for architectural masterpieces found across the planet and, what's more, have remained relevant into the 21st Century. While the Romans borrowed many architectural designs from the Greeks and Etruscans, the additions that they did make to the world of architecture changed that world forever. Their invention of cement, their new use of arches and vaults, the development in aqueducts, and the development of road systems ...
    Related: architecture, roman, roman architecture, roman empire, architectural design
  • Romanesque Architecture - 3,014 words
    Romanesque Architecture THE BASILICA AND BASILICAN CHURCHES A great deal of conjecture has been expended on the question as to the genesis of the Roman basilica. For present purposes it may be sufficient to observe that the addition of aisles to the nave was so manifest a convenience that it might not improbably have been thought of, even had models not been at hand in the civic buildings of the Empire. The most suitable example that can be chosen as typical of the Roman basilica of the age of Constantine is the church of S. Maria Maggiore. And this, not merely because, in spite of certain modern alterations, it has kept in the main its original features, but also because it departs, to a le ...
    Related: architecture, gothic architecture, romanesque, early christian, middle ages
  • Romanesque Architecture - 2,992 words
    ... alls, but a chamber of equal dimension with the aisle. This arrangement not only affords additional spaces but also, by reason of the greater height of the edifice, might seem to facilitate the provision of a more liberal supply of light, unimpeded by neighbouring buildings. This last mentioned advantage is, however, almost entirely negatived by the circumstance that, in this class of buildings, each bay of the gallery is subdivided by means of coupled or grouped arches, so that the additional obstruction offered to the passage of the light almost entirely counterbalance the possible gain through additional fenestration. We say the possible gain because, in fact, the galleries of these c ...
    Related: architecture, gothic architecture, romanesque, gothic style, renaissance period
  • Rome - 361 words
    Rome Greek culture laid the foundation for the Roman Empire. The Roman people wanted to be like the Greek people. For example the Romans made a sculpture of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. The Romans recognized the Greek art and architecture to be very well done. Since the Romans likes these traits of the Greek they used the Greeks ideas and created there own. That was the basis of the Roman Empire. In 64 AD there was a fire in Rome that burned down a large part of the city. When Rome decided to reconstruct they built the city back up in Greek style. They used the Greek architecture, and made it into their own. In 385 AD the Roman Empire fell into the West-Roman Empire and the East-Roman Empire ...
    Related: rome, greek culture, roman architecture, greek gods, goddess
  • Rome Italy - 990 words
    Rome Italy My Trip to Rome, Italy I had learned I was being sent to Italy in March of 2000 for a machine tool exhibition. I found out the happy news just before leaving work. Excitedly I jumped into my car and started my journey home. As I drove home down I-95 through all of the usual evening traffic I just kept thinking about ho I was going to tell my husband we were going to Italy. That night I continuously paced the floor looking out of my bedroom window to see if my husband was home from work yet. As he drove up in our driveway I ran outside to tell him the good news. I said, Nick guess where we are going in March? Before he could even say where I yelled out Italy! Italy, he said with a ...
    Related: ancient rome, italy, rome, european history, guided tour
  • Saint Report: - 1,017 words
    ... hen might yet be saved. That night St. Nicholas appeared in a dream to Constatine, and told him with threats to release the three innocent men, and Ablavius experienced the same thing. In the morning the Emporor and the prefect compared notes, and the condemned men were sent for and questioned. When he heard that they had called on the name of the Nicholas of Myra who had appeared to him, Constatine set them free and sent them to the bishop with a letter asking him not to threaten him any more but to pray for the peace of the world. For long this was the most famous miracle of St. Nicholas, and at the time of St. Methodius was the only thing generally known about him. The accounts are un ...
    Related: saint, saint nicholas, russian orthodox church, men and women, freely
  • The Apostle Peter - 968 words
    The Apostle Peter The Apostle Peter, often known as Saint Peter, was the most prominent disciple of Jesus Christ. During his life, he followed Christ with very much devotion, and truly believed in his mission and purpose. Because of his devotion, he was chosen by Jesus to become the first Pope, and to take control of the Christian church. Peter was the son of Jona and he had a younger brother called Andrew, who first brought him to Jesus. His native town was Bethsaida, on the western coast of the Sea of Galilee. He was trained in the occupation of a fisherman. His father died when he was still a young boy, causing him to have to be brought up under the care of Zebedee and his wife Salome wit ...
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  • The Roman Forum - 593 words
    The Roman Forum The Roman Forum The Forum Romanum, the Roman name for what we usually call the Roman Forum, was the center of the Roman Empires power. The Forum came into existence at a crossing of two important roads. One ran parallel to the Tiber River, the other perpendicular. From the beginning, the Forum was required to satisfy two fundamental needs: the need for people to meet, and the need of them to exchange goods. The many separate communities of the Italian peninsula where first united by the Etruscans in the seventh century B.C. Traditionally, these Etruscans always used a central square for business matters. Tarquinius Priscus, the first Etruscan king, reclaimed the swampy valley ...
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  • The Youth Of Francis - 1,273 words
    ... ve of God in the streets, asking not for money, but for stones and mortar. And people gave them to him. So, with his own hands, he rebuilt the Church of San Damiano. Francis cared for the sick and the poor. He was never ashamed to touch anyone, and even kissed the hands of a leper. Soon, others would join Francis in his life of poverty. Many young men, inspired by Francis, also wished to change their lives. Francis told them to give all they had to the poor. The first two were Bernardo di Quintavalle and Peitro dei Cattani, and they lived with Francis in huts of branches and mud by Portiuncula. Soon, many others joined the group and they moved to a small, rotten shed in a place called Ri ...
    Related: francis, saint francis, pope john paul, pope john paul ii, blessing
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