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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: rightness

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  • Aaron Burr Treason Trial - 1,399 words
    Aaron Burr Treason Trial The early 1800's were an unusual time in the history of the United States. A country in its infancy, growing, turbulent, and filled with intrigue where political and economic fortunes were made and lost overnight. While the country was founded on noble ideas---and no doubt these powerful ideas were taken seriously---how such ideas were to be put into practice created fertile ground for personal ambition and interest to be a stronger motivator than the "common good". In fact, at times it appears that the ideas were little more than vehicles for the personal ambitions---and in the case of this story---the personal vendettas of powerful personalities. Aaron Burr, brilli ...
    Related: aaron, aaron burr, burr, treason, trial
  • Abortion In Utilitarian Terms - 1,387 words
    Abortion In Utilitarian Terms Abortion This essay is an analysis of abortion in utilitarian terms. Compared to some writings on abortion, it is very short. And it is short for good reason: utilitarianism really has very little to say on this issue. Intuitionists will predictably take this as proof of the inadequacy of utilitarianism. The utilitarian, however, after noticing the various muddles produced by the intuitionist - the arguments over whether the fetus is a person, whether one person has the right to the use of another's body and/or whether someone has the right to determine what occurs in their own body (and in the case of both, the interminable debates as to what is to be done abou ...
    Related: abortion, utilitarian, animal abuse, high cost, poorer
  • American Dream - 755 words
    American Dream What specific ills does Miller diagnose in the America Dream? Discuss with reference to "Death of a Salesman". The American Dream is an idea that originated from the Pilgrim Fathers and has remained in the American society. It is the belief that America is the land of opportunity where everyone can be "great". The word "dream" is in fact probably the best way to describe the problems that Arthur Miller can see in this belief. The word "dream" can suggest something wonderful to look forward to achieving, or, it may imply that something is only a dream, something that is impossible to achieve. We can see Miller believes "dream" to mean the latter of these interpretations when we ...
    Related: american, american dream, american history, american society, dream
  • Analysis Of The Underlying Social Psychology - 1,123 words
    Analysis of the underlying social psychology of the Holocaust March 9, 2000 The hate and prejudice that began the Holocaust went hand in hand with a political agenda that was fueled by the frustration aggression theory.(1) Hitler blamed the Jews for the loss of World War I and thus, instead of targeting political aspects of the Jewish community, he displaced his aggression towards ALL Jews, even the helpless. This, combined with religious anti-Semitism prejudice that had been present in Germany for 1500 years and the theory of eugenics, was the political and instrumental center of Hitler's political campaign.(5) He used a system of 'elimination of freedom', which he felt was necessary in the ...
    Related: psychology, social psychology, underlying, cognitive dissonance, jewish community
  • Antigone - 482 words
    Antigone Sophocles' trilogy of Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus, and Antigone is a powerful, tragic tale that examines the nature of human guilt, fate and punishment. Creon, Oedipus' uncle and brother-in-law, is the story's most dynamic character. His character experiences a drastic metamorphosis through the span of the three dramas. Creon's vision of a monarch's proper role, his concept of and respect for justice, as well as his respect for the design evolve considerably by the trilogy's tragic conclusion. In Oedipus the King (OK) , the audience is introduced to a Creon who seems to put loyalty to the king above all. He sympathizes with the tragic plight of King Oedipus and asserts no a ...
    Related: antigone, king oedipus, oedipus the king, oedipus at colonus, evolve
  • Beowulf And Christianity - 274 words
    Beowulf And Christianity The epic poem Beowulf, one of the sources for a Western paradigm portrays Christ as a warrior. The Anglo-Saxon tradions emphasises Christainity as a herioc code, yet sometimes contradicting to traditional Christain values. Is Beowulf a Christain poem? Luke 11:4. Forgiveness, an important virtue in a Christains life. When Beowulf sees his life coming to a close before he faces the dragon, he decides to forgive his enemies. Even though they feel no remores or sdaness for their evil deeds of killing and murdering kinsman. Beowulf wanted to get his life in check for God. We see in the Bible Jesus Christ at the cross "Forgave then for they no not what they have done." Thr ...
    Related: beowulf, christianity, jesus christ, anglo saxon, glory
  • Cause Of The Culture Wars - 1,076 words
    ... under control of the tyrant neccessary because of the need to organize the production and distribution of resources. The patriarchial tyrant was the perfect organizer to make it all happen. And so it began. With the development of the army, societies now began to have an investment in male dominated governments that quickly became so deeply ingrained in culture, that most people assume they are genetic in origin. This was reflected in new religions that revolutionized human spirituality. Gone were the benign fertility goddesses (or at least they were sublimated), and they were replaced by fierce, warlike gods intended to intimidate. These gods not only were intended not just to intimidat ...
    Related: culture wars, satellite technology, in another country, self determination, dominant
  • Chartism - 1,629 words
    Chartism By Thomas Carlyle One of the most salient social problems of the Victorian period was the struggle of the working class. In Chartism by Thomas Carlyle, the problem is outlined; in William Dodds narrative, it is recounted from personal experience. Elizabeth Gaskells North and South is a fictional account of the very real condition of England. Clearly, questions of social and economic injustice were on the front burner even as the social oppression transpired. Another very prominent feature of Victorian England was religion, more specifically Christianity. William Dodd and Bessy Higgins are individuals who have endured enormous suffering, who have lost any sort of quality of life to t ...
    Related: formal education, social injustice, jewish people, assertion, witnesses
  • Communism In The World - 3,056 words
    ... ginning a nationwide offensive against the peasantry. Unknown millions died as a result. However, his industrial campains of the late 1930s enabled the Soviet Union to rise to the foremost rank of industrial powers. It was also during this time that Stalin enacted the Great Terror which killed millions. Millions more were sent to concentration camps. The fear of Stalin was carried out by his secret police called Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti or KGB.Then an event happened that forever change the world's view of the Soviet Union. That event would be known as World War II. Stalin personnally led the assault on Germany that eventually resulted in the end of the war. The choice now was ...
    Related: after world, communism, third world, third world countries, world countries, world war ii, world wide
  • Descartes Proof Of The Existence Of God - 1,280 words
    Descartes' Proof Of The Existence Of God The intention of this paper will be to examine Descartes argument for the existence of God. First, I will review Descartes proof for the existence of God. Then, I will discuss some consequences that appear as a result of Gods existence. Finally, I will point to some complications and problems that exist within the proof. Descartes proof of the existence of God occurs in the Third Meditation. He builds his entire argument upon his proof in the previous meditation that in order for him to think, he must exist. From this single observation, Descartes notices that the idea of his existence is very clear and distinct in his mind; based upon this clarity an ...
    Related: descartes, existence of god, gods existence, proof, third meditation
  • Divine Command Theory - 712 words
    Divine Command Theory The Divine Command Theory Religion and ethics are seen to be somehow inseparable in our culture. Religious leaders are usually appealed to in some capacity when dealing with various moral and political problems. Their opinions are given great weight because they are thought to be in some kind of special relationship with God that the common person does not have. The view that God creates the moral law is often called the Divine Command Theory. According to this view, what makes an action right is that God desires it to be done. The divine command theory is the idea that moral actions are those which correspond to God's will. The simplest and most common form of the Divi ...
    Related: command, command theory, divine, divine command, religious leaders
  • Doll House By Ibsen - 1,575 words
    Doll House By Ibsen Today a reader might find it hard to imagine how daring Nora Helmer was a hundred years ago. The theme of womens liberation makes this story seem almost contemporary. This was considered a controversial play featuring a woman seeking individuality. "A Dolls House" was the play that made Ibsen world famous. It was written well ahead of its time. In Ibsens time it was considered an outrage for a woman such as Nora to display a mind of her own. It was unthinkable that a woman would leave her husband to obtain freedom. This play presents problems and that still appear in todays society. This play, one of Ibsens most popular works, was a simple classic story of womens liberati ...
    Related: doll, doll house, dolls house, ibsen, social status
  • Ethical Management Procedures Manage - 657 words
    Ethical Management Procedures Manage Ethical Management Procedures Manage There are so many instances in life where ethics play a major role in decisions that we, as humans, make. Ethical decision making processes take place mostly when conclusions are reached that directly effect people, but what are ethics? The Random House-Webster's Dictionary of Modern English defines ethics as: The branch of philosophy dealing with values relating to human conduct, with respect to the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness and badness of motives and ends. This paints a pretty clear picture of what it means to make ethical decisions. This sounds like if you just follow your conscience then i ...
    Related: ethical, ethical decision, ethical decision-making, manage, management
  • Ethics On Abortion - 1,925 words
    Ethics On Abortion Abortion from an ethical point of view " Describe and evaluate any two contrasting theoretical approaches to the moral debate of abortion." * * * It is widely accepted that the fact of abortion has been a subject of conversation and controversy for many decades. Since the proportion of people who accept abortion as a 'normal' procedure is equal to the proportion of those who think of abortion as a 'crime', through time a lot of measurements have been taken against abortion but concerning it's defense as well. Although the fact of abortion has been examined through it's scientific and religious side, in this assignment we will try and examine abortion from an ethical point ...
    Related: abortion, abortion debate, ethics, morality of abortion, moral agent
  • Flood Plain Ethics: The Conflicts Between Utilitarianism And Aldo Leopold's Land Ethics - 802 words
    Flood Plain Ethics: The Conflicts Between Utilitarianism And Aldo Leopold'S Land Ethics This paper will discuss the conflicts between the utilitarian ethical theory and the ethical theory put forth by Aldo Leopold known as The Land Ethic. The question chosen to express the philosophical differences central in the two theories is, what should we do with flood plain land use? The land use issue in general requires careful consideration. The flood plain land use issue illustrates the utilitarian and Aldo Leopold's Land Ethic philosophical conflicts. Utilitarianism derives from: 1) Actions which result in the greatest good for the greatest number of people. 2) Promote efficiency by comparing act ...
    Related: aldo, aldo leopold, ethics, flood, human ethics, plain, utilitarianism
  • Inclusion - 2,342 words
    ... incipal reported that at Valley School they moved into a collaborative teaching model slowly, beginning only with fifth grades (in 19988), then serving only third and fourth grades (in 1990). By 1991, however, the program had expanded to include third, fourth, and fifth grades. The collaborative teaching model provided full-time services in general education classes for students with LD who had been served in a resource program. Only 23 of the 40 students with LD and two of the seven special education teachers were involved in the collaborative learning disabilities programs in this school: the remaining students with LD and students with other disabilities who attended this school were ...
    Related: inclusion, court cases, team member, education classes, lesson
  • Its Not About School Prayer - 1,028 words
    It's Not About School Prayer The question of school prayer has been moved from one of the storage rooms way beyond the wings to somewhere prominently on stage, if not front stage and center. The most important thing about the discussion of a school prayer amendment is not school prayer as such. People of eminently good sense and religious conviction can disagree about whether there should be prayer in public schools and, if so, what kind of prayer and who should be in charge of it. Those decisions should be made by thousands of communities and local school boards across the country. That is called democracy. An amendment is needed not to mandate or even to encourage school prayer but to rest ...
    Related: prayer, prayer in public schools, school prayer, supreme court, public life
  • John Updike And Individualism - 856 words
    John Updike And Individualism John Updike wrote many books and short stories. Many of his characters resembled people he knew or they reflected his views on what was going on in America (Interview 75-79). They expressed his views on the value system that people lived by. One of these ideas was individualism. Individualism has not always been present in society. Up until the late 1960s, people accepted whatever was happening around them. Very few stood up for themselves or for others. Many people wished to, but were too afraid to speak up. They had to find other ways of expressing what they really thought. John Updikes idea of individuality expressed through the character of Sammy, in "A&P," ...
    Related: individualism, john updike, updike, addison wesley, never knew
  • Julius Ceasar - 845 words
    Julius Ceasar In Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Decius Brutus and Mark Antony, both Roman Senators, eulogize Julius Caesar, each using a different technique and approach. Brutus, in a somewhat arrogant, to the point, eulogy, attempts to sway the people. He justifies conspiring against Caesar by stating that Caesar's ambition would have hurt Rome. However, in Antony's eulogy, he focuses on Caesar's positive traits, and cunningly disproves Brutus' justification for killing Caesar. The fickle Romans waver between leaders, responding emotionally, rather than intellectually, to the orators. Brutus seeks to explain why he conspired against Caesar. He begins his speech with Romans, countrymen ..., ap ...
    Related: ceasar, julius, julius caesar, julius ceasar, mark antony
  • Justice In Platos Republic - 503 words
    Justice In Plato's Republic Justice in Plato's Republic Paper 2 In the Republic, Plato attempts to answer one of philosophy's most central questions: What is justice or right conduct? Thrasymachus, who is upset at Socrates' rhetoric interrupts, suggests that justice is what is in the interest of the stronger. Thrasymachus's view of justice is that justice is the advantage of the stronger. Thrasymachus explains this by expressing that the government makes rules to its own advantage and so it is declared just for their people. Socrates argues Thrasymachus's view by insisting that rulers command certain acts on their subjects which sometimes mistake their own best interest causing themselves ha ...
    Related: definition of justice, plato's republic, platos republic, republic, more important
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