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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: regard

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  • In Chaucers Day Women Were Thought Of In Lesser Regard Than Men - 1,490 words
    In Chaucers day women were thought of in lesser regard than men. Their positions in the community were less noble and often displeasing. The Canterbury Tales, written by Chaucer, is about a pilgrimage to Canterbury. Along with the narrator (Chaucer), there are 29 other Canterbury pilgrims. Not surprisingly, only three of them are women: the Prioress, the associate of the Prioress, and the Wife of Bath. Each traveler is to tell two tales to make the journey to Canterbury and back more enjoyable. The Host, Harry Bailey, is in charge of the group and will decide what is in the best interest of them all. Thus, the journey begins as do the tales. Even though the times suggest women are weak and p ...
    Related: lesser, regard, the knight, the narrator, prioress
  • Philosophy - 476 words
    Fig. 1 is my own interpretation and illustrations of the idea of founder K.Matsushita that is applied in the actual business management. Outermost circle represents business activity, such as development, production, sales, and administration, i.e., the actual work itself. They are, however, based on the deeper structure, that is the management control system, which is composed of various mechanisms based on divisional system. Now, those systems are again structured in order to achieve management philosophy that is laid even underneath. This management philosophy is the basic way of thinking of the company, or sense of value in the company. It is to question, for example, in a little grandio ...
    Related: philosophy, management control, business & management, human happiness, originated
  • 16th Century Poetry - 1,273 words
    16Th Century Poetry Part I: 1. Name three of the Germanic tribes that brought to England the dialects that make up the basis of the language we now call Old English. The Germanic tribes that brought the dialects were the Angles, the Saxons, and the Jutes. 2. Give an example from Beowulf of three of the following poetic devices: alliteration, the kenning, variation (repetition of appositives), or the litote (understatement). There are several examples of alliteration in lines 3079-3084, "Nothing we advised could ever convince the prince we loved, our land's guardian, not to vex the custodian of the gold, let him lie where he was long accustomed, lurk there under earth until the end of the wor ...
    Related: century poetry, poetry, wife of bath, queen guinevere, repetition
  • 1776 Vs 1789 - 1,691 words
    1776 vs 1789 The American and French Revolutions both occurred in the eighteenth century; subverting the existing government and opening the way for capitalism and constitutionalism. Because of these similarities, the two revolutions are often assumed to be essentially eastern and western versions of each other. However, the two are fundamentally different in their reason, their rise, progress, termination, and in the events that followed, even to the present. The American Revolution was not primarily fought for independence. Independence was an almost accidental by-product of the Americans attempt to rebel against and remove unfair taxes levied on them by British Parliament. Through propaga ...
    Related: working class, middle class, great britain, master, propaganda
  • 65279 It Is Unusual When A Masterpiece Develops Out Of An Assignment, But That Is, More Or Less, What - 1,904 words
    It is unusual when a masterpiece develops out of an assignment, but that is, more or less, what happened in the case of Gullivers Travels. The Martinus Scriblerus Club proposed to satirize the follies and vices of learned, scientific and modern men. Each of the members was given a topic, and Swifts was to satirize the numerous and popular volumes describing voyages to faraway lands. Ten years passed between the Scriblerus project and the publication of Gullivers Travels, but when Swift finished, he had completed a definitive work in travel literature. Moreover, he had completed what was to become a childrens classic (in its abridged form) and a satiric masterpiece. Swifts main character, Gul ...
    Related: masterpiece, unusual, make sense, time passes, principal
  • Thousand Cranes By Yasunari Kawabata - 1,659 words
    "Thousand Cranes" by Yasunari Kawabata ILLUSTRATE THE ROLE WHICH MRS OTA AND HER DAUGHTER FUMIKO PLAY IN BRINGING ABOUT THE REFORMATION OF KIKUJI'S CHARACTER TO COME TO TERMS WITH HIS PAST. IN WHAT WAYS (IF ANY) DOES THIS HELP HIM BECOME A BETTER PERSON? Kawabata's "Thousand Cranes" is a novel that puts little emphasis on story lines, placing more value on emotions, reflections, symbolism and such. The rather crude (at first sight) plot of this complicated piece of Japanese literature is concentrated on a tangled web of relationships of the past, riddled with jealousy, insecurity and deep mistrust. Kikuji Mitani, the main character, has grown up watching many of these triangular and adultero ...
    Related: first impressions, the girl, main character, insecurity, secure
  • A Battle For Adulthood - 410 words
    A Battle for Adulthood Throughout the novel The Red Badge of Courage, written by Stephen Crane, a theme is portrayed within a battle that takes place during the Civil War. It is that each person must find the courage to win his or her won battle for maturity or adulthood. A soldier, who is also the main character, Henry Fleming, exemplifies this theme. Henry Fleming begins as an immature soldier who enlists in the army without knowing a reason why. Henry has a romantic view of the war, and expects it to be glorious: "They [battles] might not be distinctly Homeric, but there seemed to be much glory in them. He [Henry] had read of marches, sieges, conflicts, and he had longed to see it all." H ...
    Related: adulthood, main character, red badge of courage, civil war, army
  • A Clockwork Orange - 255 words
    A Clockwork Orange Many of us like to think that humanity as a whole is progressing to a better future where we will live united and in peace with one another. Nevertheless, there are those among us that do not share these beliefs. In A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess, a futuristic world is turned upside down and in shambles. This 1962 classic is a frightful depiction of what our society could become and possibly, what it already is. Drugs almost seem to be legal and unregulated and subsequently are widely used. The prison system is overcrowded with young punk criminals who are inherently evil with no regard for humanity, or any part of society for that matter. Youth take over the stree ...
    Related: a clockwork orange, clockwork, clockwork orange, orange, anthony burgess
  • A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthurs Court By Mark Twain 1835 1910 - 1,787 words
    A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court by Mark Twain (1835 - 1910) A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court by Mark Twain (1835 - 1910) Type of Work: Social satire Setting England; 6th-century, during the reign Of King Arthur Principal Characters Hank Morgan, the Connecticut Yankee "Boss"; in reality a 19th-century mechanic King Arthur, King of England Merlin, Arthur's court magician Sandy, Hank's sixth-century wife Story Overveiw Hank Morgan, born in Hartford, Connecticut, was head superintendent at a vast arms factory. There he had the means to create anything - guns, revolvers, cannons, boilers, engines, and all sorts of labor-saving machinery. If there wasn't already a quick, new ...
    Related: a connecticut yankee in king arthur's court, connecticut, connecticut yankee, king arthur, mark, mark twain, twain
  • A Good Man Is Hard To Find - 1,311 words
    A Good Man Is Hard To Find A Look at Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man is Hard to Find" By Amy Carr In the short story A Good Man is Hard to Find, Flannery O'Connor uses many different tactics to accurately portray the south in the 1950's. O'Connor uses her style, themes, and point of view to tell a story of a family outing gone wrong. The story involves a grandmother, her only son and his wife, and their two bratty children, June Star and John Wesley. On their way to Florida, the grandmother convinces the family to detour to see an old house, and while heading towards their destination, the car overturns. The much-feared criminal, The Misfit, an escaped murderer, encounters the family, and of ...
    Related: good man is hard to find, nuclear family, book reports, john wesley, trees
  • A Jury Of Her Peers: A Character Analysis - 1,562 words
    A Jury Of Her Peers: A Character Analysis James McMasters English 112 October 17, 2000 A JURY OF HER PEERS - A CHARACTER ANALYSIS BY SUSAN GLASPELL As in the case of most, if not all, good allegorical stories, the primary impact of the tale is strongly influenced by the authors detailed characterization of the setting, as well as the characters feelings and passions. Certainly such is the case in Susan Glaspells story A Jury of Her Peers. Here we see a richness of characterization and setting that is elusive at first reading, but becomes clearer as the story evolves. In the final analysis, it becomes clear just who the jury is and the outcome of their collective verdict. It is by the use of ...
    Related: character analysis, jury, jury of her peers, human condition, breaking point
  • A Postmodern Age - 1,423 words
    A Post-Modern Age? A Post-Modern Age? Introduction: Post-Modernism can be described as a particular style of thought. It is a concept that correlates the emergence of new features and types of social life and economic order in a culture; often called modernization, post-industrial, consumer, media, or multinational capitalistic societies. In Modernity, we have the sense or idea that the present is discontinuous with the past, that through a process of social, technological, and cultural change (either through improvement, that is, progress, or through decline) life in the present is fundamentally different from life in the past. This sense or idea as a world view contrasts with what is commo ...
    Related: postmodern, american market, european history, post modern, depot
  • A Rose For Emily - 1,067 words
    A Rose For Emily "A Rose for Emily" In "A Rose for Emily," William Faulkner's symbolic use of the "rose" is essential to the story's theme of Miss Emily's self-isolation. The rose is often a symbol of love, and portrays an everlasting beauty. The rose has been used for centuries to illustrate an everlasting type of love and faithfulness. Even when a rose dies, it is still held in high regard. Miss Emily's "rose" exists only within the story's title. Faulkner leaves the reader to interpret the rose's symbolic meaning. Miss Emily was denied the possibility of falling in love in her youth, so subsequently she isolated herself from the world and denied the existence of change. Miss Emily was den ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, emily grierson, emily william faulkner, miss emily grierson, rose for emily
  • A Rose For Emily Time And Setting - 963 words
    A Rose For Emily (Time And Setting) In A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner, the author uses the element of time to enhance details of the setting and vice versa. By avoiding the chronological order of events of Miss Emily's life, Faulkner first gives the reader a finished puzzle, and then allows the reader to examine this puzzle piece by piece, step by step. By doing so, he enhances the plot and presents two different perspectives of time held by the characters. The first perspective (the world of the present) views time as a mechanical progression in which the past is a diminishing road. The second perspective (the world of tradition and the past) views the past as a huge meadow which no w ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, rose for emily, vice versa, william faulkner
  • A Study Of The Book Of Mark - 1,441 words
    A Study of the BOOK of MARK annon An Essay for Humanities Courses That Treat The Bible As A Historical Document MARK'S THEOLOGY REFLECTED IN WRITING Mark and the other evangelists used basically five ways to change, edit or enhance Jesus' sayings to reflect their own views of Christianity. According to the Five Gospels Book, plagiarism and changing of writing was not a crime, but actually very common Mark's time. Besides, Mark never knew Jesus first-hand, he somehow had to make a 'story' from basically Hearsay! Mark groups different parables and sayings of Jesus by topic; making a false impression that these things happened in order. This may have little effect on changing the meaning of the ...
    Related: mark, heavenly father, never knew, dark ages, quoting
  • Abnormal Psychology - 1,197 words
    Abnormal Psychology In a world full of fears, perhaps the worst one a human being should haveis that to be afraid of his fellow man. The human that should be mostfeared is the one that has Anti-Social Personality Disorder or in laymensterms the psychopath. The psychopath is probably the most deviant mindthat exists and treatment is not very successful because there is not a cureor drug to control it. The solution in my mind to control the problem ofsociopaths is to let them live in colonies with each other. Through myresearch I will develop an understanding of this personality disorder andconvince you the reader that my solution might be a viable solution. Thesociopath is a combination of ot ...
    Related: abnormal, abnormal psychology, psychology, hyperactivity disorder, violent behavior
  • Abortion - 1,731 words
    Abortion Abortion is the ending of pregnancy before birth and is morally wrong. An abortion results in the death of an embryo or a foetus. Abortion destroys the lives of helpless, innocent children and illegal in many countries. By aborting these unborn infants, humans are hurting themselves; they are not allowing themselves to meet these new identities and unique personalities. Abortion is very simply wrong. Everyone is raised knowing the difference between right and wrong. Murder is wrong, so why is not abortion? People argue that it is not murder if the child is unborn. Abortion is murder since the foetus being destroyed is living, breathing and moving. Why is it that if an infant is dest ...
    Related: abortion, induced abortion, pro-life movement, unborn child, candle
  • Abortion Clinics Should Not Be Closed - 1,231 words
    Abortion Clinics Should Not Be Closed $115 Designer Cosmetic Collection From Cosmetique -- Only $1! Abortion Clinics Should Not Be Closed In 1973, the Supreme Courts decision made it possible for women to get safe, legal abortions from well-trained medical surgeons, and therefore led to dramatic decreases in pregnancy-related injury and death ("abortion"). Now there is a new proposal to close abortion clinics. This proposal takes away the privacy rights of American women that are guaranteed by our Constitution. By closing abortion clinics the government is not only taking away womens rights, but is also punishing those whom want to exercise their right of a pro-choice woman. Abortion clinics ...
    Related: abortion, privacy rights, another country, health care, pro-choice
  • Abortion Clinics Should Not Be Closed In The Us - 1,242 words
    Abortion Clinics Should Not be Closed in the U.S. Let American Consumer Counseling Help you Get Out of Debt! Abortion Clinics Should Not be Closed in the U.S. In 1973, the Supreme Courts decision made it possible for women to get safe, legal abortions from well-trained medical surgeons, and therefore led to dramatic decreases in pregnancy-related injury and death ("abortion"). Now there is a new proposal to close abortion clinics. This proposal takes away the privacy rights of American women that are guaranteed by our Constitution. By closing abortion clinics the government is not only taking away womens rights, but is also punishing those whom want to exercise their right of a pro-choice wo ...
    Related: abortion, rape victims, liberties union, american consumer, constitution
  • Abortion Ethics - 1,399 words
    Abortion Ethics On the question of abortion being moral, the answer is clearly that terminating a fetus' life under certain circumstances is not only moral, but it is also our responsibility to terminate it if the quality of life is in question for the fetus. A second major reason is that to declare abortion immoral would mean that we would have to consider the factor of how the conception came about. This cannot and should not be done. Quality is a major factor in the question of the morality of abortion. When parents decide to keep or not keep a baby the issue of adoption does not play into this. The reason for this is that once the baby is born that the parents may change their mind if th ...
    Related: abortion, ethics, morality of abortion, point of view, human life
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