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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: radar

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  • Ultrasonic Radar For A Home Pc System - 1,014 words
    Ultrasonic Radar for a Home PC System One of the fastest changing and most expensive fields, is that of technology. Our computers, printers, modems, and much more is being outdated faster than anything else in the world. Just as we buy a new computer that does what we want, the industry comes out with a new option on a smaller and better computer. There seems to be so much changing that unless we invest our life savings into technology, we are considered obsolete like our computers. What used to fill an entire room, is so small now that it can be swallowed with a glass of milk. A computer used to be a mechanical engine that had many moving parts and was very slow. Now computers design comput ...
    Related: radar, ultrasonic, power supply, malfunction, connect
  • Ultrasonic Radar For A Home Pc System - 1,056 words
    ... phase drive) runs two coils at the same time. This provides maximum torque, although the power consumption is doubled. Mode 11 (called the half-step drive) uses one coil, then two coils, alternating between modes 7 and 9. This doubles the number of steps per revolution. If a stepper motor of twelve volts or less (indicated on the motor, along with maximum current, coil resistance and step angle) is used it is possible to run both the stepper and the Experimenter from the same power supply. It may be more economical to use a rechargeable power supply as an alternative to a small power supply. If the ranging board, Experimenter, and stepper are run off the same power supply, it is necessar ...
    Related: radar, ultrasonic, power supply, consumption, tube
  • What Is Radar - 1,103 words
    What Is Radar The word "radar" was invented by scientists of the United States Navy during World War II. The word comes from the first letters in the term "radio detection and ranging.""Detection," as used here, means finding an object or target by sending out a radio signal that will bounce back off the target as a radio echo. "Ranging" means measuring the distance to the target from the radar set(the device tat sends out the radio signal and picks up the returning echo). Radar set on the ground uses radio echoes to locate aircraft, ships, and other objects. Radar sets can locate artificial satellites and spacecraft thousands of kilometres from the earth. They can find such "targets" even i ...
    Related: radar, world war ii, early warning system, states navy, computers
  • What Is Radar - 1,096 words
    ... as bright spots, called blips. The usual type of indicator is the plan position indicator, or PPI. It has a large tube, much like the picture tube in a television set. On the face of this tube, the operator sees a maplike picture of the surrounding region. This picture looks as if it were made liking down at the area from high above the radar set. The blips show where land areas are located. Blips also show the position of targets such as planes and ships. The radar operator can pick out these targets because they are moving, while the land areas are not. Uses of Radar Radar has both military and civilian uses. There are two main military uses of radar. One is called search radar. The ot ...
    Related: radar, funk wagnalls, another country, fire control, weather
  • You Might Remember The Heroic Role That Newlyinvented Radar Played In The Second World War People Hailed It Then As Our Mirac - 1,400 words
    You might remember the heroic role that newly-invented radar played in the Second World War. People hailed it then as "Our Miracle Ally". But even in its earliest years, as it was helping win the war, radar proved to be more than an expert enemy locator. Radar technicians, doodling away in their idle moments, found that they could focus a radar beam on a marshmallow and toast it. They also popped popcorn with it. Such was the beginning of microwave cooking. The very same energy that warned the British of the German Luftwaffe invasion and that policemen employ to pinch speeding motorists, is what many of us now have in our kitchens. It's the same as what carries long distance phone calls and ...
    Related: heroic, radar, second world, more effective, microwave oven
  • You Might Remember The Heroic Role That Newlyinvented Radar Played In The Second World War People Hailed It Then As Our Mirac - 1,400 words
    You might remember the heroic role that newly-invented radar played in the Second World War. People hailed it then as "Our Miracle Ally". But even in its earliest years, as it was helping win the war, radar proved to be more than an expert enemy locator. Radar technicians, doodling away in their idle moments, found that they could focus a radar beam on a marshmallow and toast it. They also popped popcorn with it. Such was the beginning of microwave cooking. The very same energy that warned the British of the German Luftwaffe invasion and that policemen employ to pinch speeding motorists, is what many of us now have in our kitchens. It's the same as what carries long distance phone calls and ...
    Related: heroic, radar, second world, human body, electromagnetic radiation
  • 2001 A Space Odyssey - 1,265 words
    2001 A Space Odyssey 2001 : A Space Odyssey. I am going to be talking about Stanley Kubricks '2001: a space odyssey', focusing (obviously) on the music, but also the sound. I will also be incorporating elements from Mark Millers article "2001 - a cold descent" 2001: A Space Odyssey, introduced in 1968, is a high concept production that begins by tracing the 'Dawn Of Man', which eventually leads to a journey through the solar system by a crew of astronauts aboard a spaceship bound for Jupiter. The accompanying soundtrack plays as much of a role in the development of suspense and intrigue as the actors performances. Three decades later, the soundtrack remains one of the most recognized in cine ...
    Related: odyssey, space odyssey, space station, sound effects, ridley scott
  • A Global War Or An Intercontinental Nuclear Exchange Is Highly Unlikely In The Current World Political Climate But As Long As - 1,605 words
    A global war or an intercontinental nuclear exchange is highly unlikely in the current world political climate. But as long as considerable nuclear weapons and long range delivery systems exist in other countries and a developing threat resides with potential adversaries, the possibility of an aerospace attack on North America cannot be discounted. Furthermore, the proliferation of cruise and ballistic missiles, and weapons of mass destruction, has made the post-Cold War world more, rather than less, dangerous. New generations of these weapons may be in the hands of governments or organizations which could threaten the North American continent, or American and Canadian military personnel dep ...
    Related: climate, intercontinental, nuclear, nuclear weapons, political climate
  • Airline Safety - 1,052 words
    Airline Safety What Should the Regulations be Regarding Airline Safety? Introduction It was early in the morning, warm & sunny. We had the day off from school for some reason, but I can't remember why. I was riding my bike in the street with my friend, Mike, about 4 blocks from my home in the North Park area of San Diego when I heard a faint blast, looked up and saw a jetliner falling out of the sky on fire. I can't remember thinking anything except It's going to hit my house. Then I realized there were probably a lot of people on the plane, and was immediately so scared I began to cry. Then I didn't hear anything until the plane hit the ground. Watching that plane on impact is a sensation I ...
    Related: airline, safety regulations, charles de gaulle, paris france, likes
  • Aliens - 1,911 words
    Aliens -- Copyright Information -- 1999 SIRS Mandarin, Inc. -- SIRS Researcher Spring 1999 Title: Scientists: UFO Reports May Be Worth Evaluating Author: Michelle Levander Source: San Jose Mercury News (San Jose, CA) Publication Date: June 28, 1998 Page Number(s): n.p. --------------------------- SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS (San Jose, Calif.) June 28, 1998, n.p. (c) 1998, Knight-Ridder Newspapers. Distributed by Knight-Ridder/Tribune Information Services. SCIENTISTS: UFO REPORTS MAY BE WORTH EVALUATING by Michelle Levander Mercury News Staff Writer For more than 50 years, UFO investigators have scoured the skies for signs of alien life--completely snubbed by the scientific community as cranks. Bu ...
    Related: aliens, central intelligence agency, stanford university, staff writer, rockefeller
  • And This I Am Proud Of - 1,726 words
    And This I Am Proud Of And this I am Especially Proud of - Q Introduction - Throughout the years, the weapons and gadgets that have come from the hands of the Q Branch, has never turned James Bond down, they are the coolest and are the best in spy paraphernalia. I. Bonds choice of equipment A. Walther PPK B. Aston Martin DB5 C. Watches II. Comparison to some spy gadgets of the army A. Bonds popular equipment B. Militarys popular equipment III. As technology continues to grow A. Weapons will get better 1. Equipment from newer movies a. Goldeneye b. Tomorrow Never Dies B. Gadgets of the older movies C. Other items of Qs Lab IV. What do we expect of Bond A. More high tech weapons and gadgets B. ...
    Related: proud, aston martin, secret agent, high tech, interior
  • Arpanet - 652 words
    ARPANET The USSR launches Sputnik, the first artificial earth satellite. In the late 1960s the U.S. military was desperately afraid of a nuclear attack from the Soviet Union. The United States formed the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) within the Department of Defense to establish a bombproof network to connect military bases. ARPANETs physical network was established in 1969 to enable universities and research organizations to exchange information freely. The first two nodes that formed the ARPANET were UCLA and the Stanford Research Institute, shortly after the University of Utah was added to ARPANET. The Network Control Protocol (NCP) was initially used as the ARPANET protocol, b ...
    Related: arpanet, advanced research projects agency, internet protocol, soviet union, artificial
  • Artificial Intelligence - 1,010 words
    ... 9). Unfortunately, the hard part is putting the theory into practice. It has yet to impress the people that really count: financial officers, corporate treasurers, etc. It is quite understandable though, who is willing to sink money into a system that they cannot understand? Until a track record is set for chaos most will be unwilling to try, but to get the track record someone has to try it, it's what is known as the catch-22. The chaos theory can be useful in other places as well. Kazuyuki Aihara, an engineering professor at Tokyo's Denki University, claims that chaos engineering can be applied to analyzing heart patients. The pattern of beating hearth changes slightly and each person ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, chaos theory
  • Athletes As Role Models - 1,023 words
    ... eion, but he never really liked that part of him so he changed his ways. Deion spent hours passing out food to the people in his community. Sanders is faithful to his community and he is also faithful to God. Deion is a dedicated Christian (Baker 1D). This shows how caring, giving, and unselfish he is as a person. Our society needs these types of role models for people to look up to. One issue that seems to come up quite often with the mention of athletes is Drugs. Of all the major athlete drug testing programs, only the NBA does not test for marijuana, because the NBA drug policy does not include marijuana in its list or banned drugs(Athletes With). This is probably the main reason they ...
    Related: professional athletes, role model, drug testing, peer pressure, incident
  • Aviationaerospace Psychology - 1,361 words
    Aviation/Aerospace Psychology Eastern Flight 401 What really happened! By For Aviation/Aerospace Psychology MAS 634 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Extended Campus Fort Rucker, Alabama Resident Center March 2000 The following National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) abstract indicates only one of the many reasons for the actual crash. Date: December 29, 1972 Type: Lockheed L-1011 Registration: N310EA Operator: Eastern Airlines Where: Miami, FL Report No. NTSB-AAR-73-14 Report Date: June 14, 1973 Pages: 45 An Eastern Air Lines Lockheed L-1011 crashed at 2342 eastern standard time, December 29, 1972, 18.7 miles west-northwest of Miami International Airport, Miami, Florida. The aircraft ...
    Related: psychology, international airport, health problems, miami florida, faulty
  • Aviationaerospace Psychology - 1,450 words
    ... aircraft. Additionally, from reading the Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) transcripts that the flight crew was also lacking in what is considered general operator knowledge. Specifically there was confusion between the flight crew on how to change and test the gear indicator light, and how to view the mechanical nose gear indicator in the nose compartment. The flight crew also displayed a lack of awareness of the actual aircraft's position and had become complacent in their duties by relying on the autopilot to fly the aircraft. This lack of awareness is displayed in the transcript when the CAM-2 microphone recorded "We did something to the altitude" CAM-1 recorded "What?" CAM-2 recorded "W ...
    Related: psychology, international airport, national transportation safety board, traffic control, landing
  • Battle Of Britain - 1,285 words
    Battle Of Britain Battle of Britain Dunkirk-May 1940 In May of 1940 German forces invaded France. By the end of May Allied troops were cornered, on the coast, in the town of Dunkirk. They had been overpowered by the German blitzkrieg(Battle of Britain).Though German bombers had destroyed over 200 of the rescue armadas ships, the British still were able to evacuate 224,000 of their troops along with 123,00 French(Mosley 20). Though they had been forced to abandon most of their equipment and supplies on the beach, the British avoided the trap set by the Germans. This event was the precursor to the Battle of Britain. At this point, Germany felt that Allied forces were weak and if they were to i ...
    Related: battle of britain, britain, great britain, highly effective, royal navy
  • Battle Of Britain - 1,295 words
    ... n their goals(Mosley 57). In the first 10 days the British suffered heavy loses because they flew in tight formations and had no room to move when they were under attack by the Germans. The RAF soon changed their strategy and began flying in Finger Four formation, which broke up the rigidity of the old formations and improved their odds against the Luftwaffe in air encounters(Mosley 86). Every day, during the months of June to October 1940, the RAF and Luftwaffe fought in the skies. The Luftwaffes final attempt to knock out the RAF began on Eagle Day, August 13,1940(Battle of Britain). Though the weather was stormy a flight of 74 Dronier bombers and 50 Me-110s headed towards RAF fields a ...
    Related: battle of britain, britain, adolf hitler, world war ii, walter
  • Black Gold Texas Tea - 1,270 words
    Black Gold Texas Tea Trevor MacKenzie Black Gold the Texas Tea In this paper I will touch on topics of oil prices, the demise and growth of oil companies large and small and international oil regulators, natural oil deposits and their locations and life expectancy, and the future of the oil industry and all it effects. I have chosen to write on this topic because of personal interest in the worlds biggest resource, oil. In past years I have thought of how the modern world revolves around certain elements and ideas, one of these is oil. I wanted to try to get answers to questions I have had about How long can we keep extracting oil from the Earth? and How will people overcome a worldwide comp ...
    Related: black gold, texas, petroleum exporting, life expectancy, ozone
  • Blitzkrieg - 1,453 words
    Blitzkrieg The First Phase: Dominance of the Axis Man for man, the German and Polish forces were an even match. Hitler committed about 1.5 million troops, and the Polish commander, Marshal Edward Smigy-Rydz, expected to muster 1.8 million. That was not the whole picture, however. The Germans had six panzer (armored) and four motorized divisions; the Poles had one armored and one motorized brigade and a few tank battalions. The Germans' 1600 aircraft were mostly of the latest types. Half of the Poles' 935 planes were obsolete. Result of German Blitzkrieg on Poland On September 1, 1939, Germany invaded Poland. The Polish army expected the attack to come along the Polish frontiers. But ...
    Related: blitzkrieg, polish army, denmark norway, north africa, history
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