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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: pulitzer prize

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  • To Kill A Mocking Bird, A Harper Lee Classic And Pulitzer Prize Winner, Is A Controversial Book It Deals With Racism In The S - 476 words
    To Kill a Mocking Bird, a Harper Lee classic and Pulitzer prize winner, is a controversial book . It deals with racism in the south, which means white vs. black. In the book, To Kill a Mocking Bird the community believes that the black man is guilty, despite any evidence, and will stop at nothing until he is dead. The notion that blacks are less human than whites is dispicable. The characters in this novel, knew full well that the black people were no different deep down inside. They taught there children that black people were inferior. Black people, were and are as good if not better, than the white people. Their brain power was equal to the white mans. The notion that black peoples soul w ...
    Related: classic, controversial, harper, harper lee, mocking, prize, prize winner
  • 1968 Life - 1,242 words
    1968 Life Analysis of Life for 1968 The year 1968 was a time of war, civil rights movements, and riots. Many big events took place during 1968. Many lives were changed by these events. Out if the 1960s, 1968 stands out the most. In January of 1968 the United States thought that the Vietnam War was coming to a close, but President Johnson made a statement that changed the direction of Vietnam. President Johnson said the South Vietnamese could not win. This caused the South Vietnamese could not win. This caused the South Vietnamese to launch the Tet Offensive. This shocked the United States, and caused the war to linger on for several more years. The Tet Offensive spread from the cities of Mek ...
    Related: life magazine, thornton wilder, popular music, summer olympics, entertainment
  • Angelou, Maya - 780 words
    Angelou, Maya Sergejs Golubevs. Mrs.Dunton. Engl.82 Maya Angelou. Maya Angelou, born April 4, 1928 as Marguerite Johnson in St. Louis, was raised in segregated rural Arkansas. She is a poet, historian, author, actress, playwright, civil-rights activist, and director. She has been working at Wake Forest University in north Carolina since 1981.She has published ten best selling books and numerous magazine articles earning her Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award nomination. At the request of President Clinton, she wrote and delivered a poem at his 1993 presidential inauguration. Whole her life, Maya Angelou has been trying to make something special in the poetry, history and in the film indu ...
    Related: angelou maya, maya, tv series, i know why the caged bird sings, collaboration
  • Anne Sexton - 1,246 words
    Anne Sexton Anne Sexton The third decade of the twentieth century brought on more explicit writers than ever before, but none were as expressive as Anne Sexton. Her style of writing, her works, the image that she created, and the crazy life that she led are all prime examples of this. Known as one of the most "confessional" poets of her time, Anne Sexton was also one of the most criticized. She was known to use images of incest, adultery, and madness to reveal the depths of her deeply troubled life, which often brought on much controversy. Despite this, Anne went on to win many awards and go down as one of the best poets of all time. Anne Sexton was born Anne Gray Harvey on November 9, 1928 ...
    Related: anne, anne sexton, sexton, personal experience, attempted suicide
  • Autobiography On Ernest Hemingway - 624 words
    Autobiography on Ernest Hemingway Earnest Miller Hemingway was borin in Oak Park Illinois. After graduating from high school, he got a job at a paper called "Kansas City Star". Hemingway continually tried to enter the military, but his defective eye, hindered this task. Hemingway had managed to get a job driving an American Red Cross ambulance. During this expedition, he was injured and hospitalized. Hemingway had an affinity for a particular nurse at that hospital, her name was Agnes von Kurowsky. Hemingway continually proposed to her, and she continually denied. When Hemingway healed his injuries, he moved back to Michigan, and had wanted to write again. Hemingway married Hadley Richardson ...
    Related: autobiography, ernest, ernest hemingway, hemingway, sun also rises
  • Beloved - 2,213 words
    Beloved Toni Morrison's Pulitzer Prize winning book Beloved, is a historical novel that serves as a memorial for those who died during the perils of slavery. The novel serves as a voice that speaks for the silenced reality of slavery for both men and women. Morrison in this novel gives a voice to those who were denied one, in particular African American women. It is a novel that rediscovers the African American experience. The novel undermines the conventional idea of a story's time scheme. Instead, Morrison combines the past and the present together. The book is set up as a circling of memories of the past, which continuously reoccur in the book. The past is embedded in the present, and the ...
    Related: beloved, last time, men and women, sweet home, sethe
  • Born In Boston In 1809, Edgar Poe Was Destined To Lead A Rather Somber And Brief Life, Most Of It - 1,157 words
    Born in Boston in 1809, Edgar Poe was destined to lead a rather somber and brief life, most of it a struggle against poverty. His mother died when Edgar was only two, his father already long disappeared. He was raised as a foster child in Virginia by Frances Allen and her husband John, a Richmond tobacco merchant. Poe later lived in Baltimore with his aunt, Maria Clemm and her daughter Virginia, whom he eventually married. The trio formed a household which moved to New York and then to Philadelphia, where they lived for about six years -- apparently the happiest, most productive years of his life. Of Poe's several Philadelphia homes, only this one survives. In 1844 they moved to New York, wh ...
    Related: boston, edgar, edgar allen, pulitzer prize, tale heart
  • Branch - 1,159 words
    Branch King a true pillar of civil rights movement By Stuart Levitan, May 22, 1998 Our greatest mass movement has a historian able to tell its overwhelming story. The civil rights movement of the early 1960s, a transcendent time in American life, played out an epochal saga of biblical proportions. The stakes were immense -- first freedom, then the franchise. The risk was absolute. The actors, whether heroic or villainous, were towering figures. Taylor Branch's Pulitzer Prize-winning Parting the Waters'' (1988) was sweeping, subtle, overwhelming, depressing, inspiring. Pillar of Fire,'' second of Branch's movement trilogy, covering 1963-65, is as good or better. Branch chronicles a staggering ...
    Related: branch, justice department, civil rights, civil rights movement, romantic
  • Carl Sandburg - 1,704 words
    ... o home. Final Draft Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), was an American poet, biographer, and balladeer. He was a writer, famous for his free-verse style (Carl Sandburg, 222). He focused on the people and places of modern American life. Sandburg wrote what is regarded as the definitive biography of Abraham Lincoln. He was even invited to address the joint session and to be honored, when the houses of Congress came together on Feb. 12, 1959, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the birth of Lincoln. Sandburg was well known as a lecturer and singer (Carl Sandburg, 392). His craggy voice along with his guitar made him a great performer of folk songs. The two most impressive things about Carl Sandbu ...
    Related: carl, carl sandburg, sandburg, public school, social democratic party
  • Charles Ives - 626 words
    Charles Ives Born in Danbury, Connecticut on October 20, 1874, Charles Ives pursued what is perhaps one of the most extraordinary and paradoxical careers in American music history. Businessman by day and composer by night, Ives's vast output has gradually brought him recognition as the most original and significant American composer of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Inspired by transcendentalist philosophy, Ives sought a highly personalized musical expression through the most innovative and radical technical means possible. A fascination with bi-tonal forms, polyrhythms, and quotation was nurtured by his father who Ives would later acknowledge as the primary creative influence on hi ...
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  • Charles Lindenburgh - 1,062 words
    ... ld not even be executed under the felony murder doctrine because kidnapping was not a felony in New Jersey. However the public and prosecutors wanted the death penltity so Hauptmann was convicted of breaking an entry and stealing pajamas, which is a felony in New Jersey. This allowed him to be executed under the felony murder doctrine. This cased caused a new federal law to come into effect and it is called the Lindbergh Law making kidnapping a federal offense if the victim is taken across state lines or the United States Postal Service was used to mail a ransom letter. In June 1936 Charles Lindbergh was invited to see the Germans air force establishment and give his opinion about it. Wh ...
    Related: charles lindbergh, world war ii, ford motor company, york hospital, mail
  • Composers Of 19th And 20th - 1,024 words
    Composers Of 19th And 20th This essay will consist of information about nine composers and one piece of work that they are known for dating from 1862 to 1990. The names of these composers are: Aaron Copeland, Claude Debussy, Charles Ives, Scott Joplin, Bessie Smith, Louis Armstrong, Leonard Berstein, Igor Stravinsky, and Arnold Schoenberg. The first composer I will discuss will be Aaron Copeland (1900 1990). Mr. Copeland was born in Brooklyn, New York USA to Russian American immigrant parents. His style is strongly tonal with polychords, polyrhythm, changing meters and percussive orchestration. His influences include his teacher Nadia Boulanger, Picasso, Stravinsky and Ernest Hemmingway. So ...
    Related: bessie smith, claude debussy, scott joplin, leonard, bars
  • Copland - 1,142 words
    Copland Aaron Copland wrote a ballet about one of the most famous western gangsters in history: Billy the Kid. The work was written in 1938 and remained popular for over a decade. Unfortunately, his works are no longer heard or performed often enough today. In my opinion, Copland is one of the greatest American performers in music history, but he is not given the recognition he deserves by today's society. By looking at Copland's works and analyzing his Billy the Kid, the necessary proof of his greatness will, without question, show the fact that he is one of the greatest American composers of all time. Aaron Copland, whose family name was changed from Kapland by immigration officials in New ...
    Related: copland, changing times, academy award, pulitzer prize, finale
  • Crimes Of The Heart By Beth Henley - 1,256 words
    Crimes of the Heart by Beth Henley The play, Crimes of the Heart, written by Beth Henley, is brilliantly charming, and Henley is completely deserving of her Pulitzer-Prize for this piece. My mother suggested I read this play because she says that I am very much like one of the main characters Lenny Magrath, and she said that I would be able to relate to many parts of the story. I found that the beginning of the play was somewhat slow and not very uplifting, but as the play progressed, I found it to be heart-warming, intriguing, and overall very entertaining. Henley, being from the South herself, wrote many of her plays in a small southern town setting. The intended meaning of this play is on ...
    Related: beth, henley, black boy, family member, depending
  • Cyber Porn - 1,583 words
    Cyber Porn Imagine a place where you have access to anything and everything one could want. Some would say that is only existent in a utopia, and some would say that describes the Internet. Many adults go on to the net and access pornographic material that would be unsuitable for children. This is called cyberporn. The controversy lies in the fact that children are accessing these materials also. Government, activist groups, and concerned parents are fighting to regulate obscene material found over the Internet to protect children. The first amendment is the only thing protecting adults from losing their rights to obtain pornographic or indecent material on the net. Under the first amendment ...
    Related: cyber, porn, newt gingrich, vanity fair, diversity
  • Death Of Salesman - 2,563 words
    Death Of Salesman Arthur Miller is one of the most renowned and important American playwrights to ever live. His works include, among others, The Crucible and A View from the Bridge. The plays he has written have been criticized for many things, but have been praised for much more, including his magical development of the characters and how his plays provide "good theater". In his plays, Miller rarely says anything about his home life, but there are at least some autobiographical"hints" in his plays. Arthur Miller is most noted for his continuing efforts to devise suitable new ways to express new and different themes. His play Death of a Salesman, a modern tragedy, follows along these lines. ...
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  • Debbie Allen - 859 words
    Debbie Allen Debbie Allen Debbie Allen has become one of Americas brightest stars. She has spent a lifetime preparing to be famous. She lives her life by the philosophy that luck is when opportunity meets preparation. Actress, singer, dancer, director, producer Allen was born in Houston, Texas, on January 16, 1950, to a Pulitzer Prize-nominee for poetry, Vivian Allen, and a dentist, Andrew Allen. She is the third of four children (one sister and two brothers) in a family that includes Phylicia Rashad--Clare on the Cosby Show and Andrew Tex Allen--a jazz musician. At the age of three, Debbie began her dance training and, by age eight, she had set her goals of a musical theater career. Her mot ...
    Related: allen, debbie, cosby show, north carolina, nominee
  • Dr Daniel J Boorstin 1914 Holds Many Honorable Positions And Has Received Numerous Awards For His Notable Work He Is One Of A - 777 words
    Dr. Daniel J. Boorstin (1914- ) holds many honorable positions and has received numerous awards for his notable work. He is one of America's most eminent historians, the author of more than fifteen books and numerous articles on the history of the United States, as well as a creator of a television show. His editor-wife, Ruth Frankel Boorstin, a Wellesley graduate, has been his close collaborator. Born in Atlanta, Georgia, and raised in Oklahoma, he received his undergraduate degree with highest honors from Harvard and his doctor's degree from Yale. He has spent a great deal of his life abroad, first in England as a Rhodes Scholar at Balliol College, Oxford. More recently he has been visitin ...
    Related: awards, boorstin, daniel, national book award, notable
  • Ernest Hemingway - 1,002 words
    ERNEST HEMINGWAY A lonely old man, Santiago, packs up his fishing gear, his eighty-fourth day of fishing without catching a single fish. His sole friend, a young man, Manolin, not even an eighth of his age brings him a beer and dinner for the evening. As they chat Santiago announces how the eighty-fifth day is his lucky day, and how he will finally catch a fish. The premise of the story is the purity and goodness and bravery of Santiago, the Cuban Fisherman in Ernest Hemingway's Pulitzer Prize winning short novel, The Old Man and the Sea. Hemingway also received the Nobel Prize for Literature for his work. The purpose of this paper is to show some methods of writing that Hemingway used to ch ...
    Related: ernest, ernest hemingway, hemingway, nobel prize, human nature
  • Ernest Hemingway The Man And His Work - 1,238 words
    Ernest Hemingway - The Man And His Work Ernest Hemingway - The Man and His Work On July 2, 1961, a writer whom many critics call the greatest writer of this century, a man who had a zest for adventure, a winner of the Nobel Prize and the Pulitzer Prize, a man who held esteem everywhere - on that July day, that man put a shotgun to his head and killed himself. That man was Ernest Hemingway. Though he chose to end his life, his heart and soul lives on through his many books and short stories. Hemingway's work is his voice on how he viewed society, specifically American society and the values it held. No other author of this century has had such a general and lasting influence on the generation ...
    Related: ernest, ernest hemingway, hemingway, american life, francis macomber
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