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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: acropolis

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  • The Acropolis - 1,533 words
    The Acropolis Elmer Boyce Architecture 110 Professor Boestler 02 November 2000 The Athenian Acropolis The Acropolis of Athens has stood as a monument of triumph to the people of Athens for centuries past. The temples within its walls were used to worship Greek gods like Athena and Poseidon. Rising over three hundred feet above the city of Athens, it can clearly be seen why it is called the Acropolis, which loosely translated means top of city. It isn't the only acropolis in Greece, but it is revered more than the others because of its almost flawless planning in where each building is placed. It took two hundred years of experimenting to get it right. Each building is placed specifically to ...
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  • A Day In The Life Of An Ancient Athenian - 1,174 words
    A Day in The Life of an Ancient Athenian jenn neff A day in the life of an ancient Athenian Welcome to Athens, the marvel of Greece! The city which is the fountainhead of beauty, wisdom and knowledge. Even as your ship approaches the Athenian harbor Piraeus, you can see the marble monuments of the Acropolis and the shining golden edge of the spear, which belongs to the gigantic statue of the goddess Pallas Athene. This is one of the greatest works of the sculptor Phidias, and symbolizes both the power and justice of the "violet city" as it was called by his contemporaries. Athenian women had virtually no political rights of any kind and were controlled by men at nearly every stage of their l ...
    Related: ancient athens, ancient greeks, athenian, athenian women, family life
  • Abstract - 744 words
    Abstract Animal experimentation has been going on for a while now and people have been protesting against it since it has begun. It seems now days there are more cons for animal experiments because of how it has become a popular topic to this day. The pros seem to think that animal experiments are necessary for living a healthy life. With all of the debating going on, animal experimentation may be halted. Animal Experimentation Should animal experimentation be regulated? Do animals have the same rights we do? These are questions that are of much debate. Animals are used in experiments all of the time, whether they are testing a new drug, or testing their reactions to a new fabric softener. B ...
    Related: abstract, human ethics, human responsibility, animal testing, peta
  • Alcoholism - 1,162 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism is perhaps the most common form of drug abuse in America today. In 1995, in the United States 67% of all the population over the age of 12 reported drinking alcohol with in the previous year. Even more astounding, is the fact that nearly 50% reported drinking some type of alcoholic beverage with in the past month. Scientist report that the reason alcohol is so popular to drinkers is because it is pleasant, relaxing, and is considered a "social beverage." But what the drinkers often do not take in to consideration are the facts that alcohol dulls the brain and confuses physical reactions. Which leads to numerous injuries, accidents, and death. Roughly 1.3 million people ...
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  • Art As A Reflection Of Anciant Civilization - 1,373 words
    Art As A Reflection Of Anciant Civilization Art as Reflection of Anciant Civilization Ancient Egytian and Greek sociaties both made significant contributions to western civilization, specificaly in the areas of politics and social structure. The political system of antient Egypt was primarily based on the religios belife that the Pharoah was a divine entity, while Greek politics were based in a democratic system that valued individuals in a unique way. The poitical and social advancments of both Greek and Egyption civilizations are best reflected in the advancement of each cultures artwork. In the early kingdom of the Egyption civilization the Pharoah rulled as a God-King and dictated the re ...
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  • Athens And Sparta The Culture - 1,029 words
    Athens And Sparta; The Culture Athens Athens was one of the first city-states. Each of these independent states consisted of a city and the region that surrounded it. Athens had a king, as did other Greek states. According to tradition, the first king of Athens was named Cecrops. Kings ruled the city-state until 682 B.C. Beginning that year, elected officials called archons headed the government of Athens. The general assembly, which consisted of all adult male citizens of Athens, elected the archons to one-year terms. After their term of office, the archons joined the Areopagus, a council of elder statesmen. The Areopagus judged murder trials and prepared political matters for the vote of t ...
    Related: athens, sparta, city states, greek state, eastern
  • Athens And Sparta: Comparison - 584 words
    Athens And Sparta: Comparison Words- 584 Athens and Sparta: Similarities and Differences One of the greatest city states of all time was the city state of Athens from which we take many of our modern ways. Their government was a full democracy in which they had an assembly was all male citizens over 25 years old, they had the council of five hundred which was chosen by lot of people over 30 and they proposed laws to the assembly. Then there was the court where there were no judges and the juries were very large, the archons which were the nine people with the most power before the assembly took it away from them. The Athenians descended from the Ionians in the attica region. Their city was m ...
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  • Chapter 3 Summary Forest Of Kings - 574 words
    Chapter 3 Summary Forest Of Kings Brice Hayden September 16, 1999 Professor Lorenz The main focus of the 20th century, or ever before that, is that we have made most of the singular inventions of mankind. However, another more fundamental form of invention existed. If we look at the Maya as a culture without many significant advances, they had few technological wonders. They were a Stone Age people lacking rudimentary developments such as the use of metal and the domestication of beasts of burden. They in there own right had invented ideas that harnessed social energy. The genius if the Maya was expressed through the creation of this new power. The invented political symbols that transformed ...
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  • Development Of Democracy In Athens - 1,127 words
    ... ns lived fifteen or twenty miles out in the countryside (Demand 224). This would have presented quite a burden for those in the countryside. So, it is possible that those who lived in the city were over represented. The Council, though, was automatically geographically diversified. Cleisthenes's reform, which ensured that people from the countryside, at least had some say at that stage of deliberations. Cleisthenes may also have been responsible for the Athenian practice known as ostracism. Under this procedure the Athenians would vote once a year in a sort of negative election. The unlucky winner, assuming a minimum of 6000 votes had been cast, was sent into exile for ten years. The ost ...
    Related: athenian democracy, athens, democracy, executive branch, peloponnesian war
  • Egyptmexican Pyramids - 1,097 words
    ... s three miles southwest of Cairo. The largest pyramid, 481 feet high and 786 feet along east side of base, was built for Khufu, who reigned between 2900 and 2877 B.C. The pyramid of Khafre, who reigned about 2859 B.C. is slightly smaller, but it is on a higher ground so that the apex is higher. The smallest pyramid (yet not small at all) was built by Menkure about 2800 B.C. (Casson 5). One of the most famous sites of Mayan culture is Tikal in Guatemala. Numerous buildings stayed almost intact at the Great Plaza: the Temple of the Giant Jaguar (700 A.D.), the Temple of the Masks (699 A.D), and the North Acropolis. At the heart of the Temple of the Giant jaguar is the tomb of high priest. ...
    Related: egyptian pyramids, pyramids, ancient maya, mayan culture, lenses
  • Greek Architecture - 1,026 words
    Greek Architecture The architecture of ancient Greece is represented by buildings in the sanctuaries and cities of mainland Greece, the Aegean islands, southern Italy and Sicily, and the Ionian coast of Turkey. Monumental Greek architecture began in the archaic period, flourished through the classical and Hellenistic periods, and saw the first of many revivals during the Roman Empire. The roots of Greek architecture lie in the tradition of local Bronze Age house and palaces. The following paper will cover the basic forms of Greek architecture. One of the many types of Greek building structures was Sacred Architecture. The Greeks conceived of their gods in human form, as anthropomorphic repre ...
    Related: architecture, greek, greek architecture, roman architecture, city states
  • Greek Art - 1,097 words
    Greek Art Greek Art By Lizette There are three major categories of Greek sculpture: freestanding statues, architectural sculpture, and nonarchitectural reliefs. The principal subjects of Greek sculpture are gods, heroes of legend, and athletes, youths, or maidens intended to demonstrate ideals of beauty. Whatever the subject, category, or material, the typical Greek sculpture was basically spiritual in function. Most statues and reliefs were dedicated as offerings in sanctuaries to please or thank divinities, or stood as markers over graves, while architectural sculpture was carved essentially only for temples, treasuries, or tombs. The determining phase of Greek sculpture closes with sculpt ...
    Related: greek, greek art, greek sculpture, female body, alexander the great
  • Greek Mythology - 1,328 words
    Greek Mythology In order to explain certain natural events, such as earthquakes, windstorms, and thunder and lightning storms, The Greeks invented a collection of myths and characters. Just as with most modern religions, Greek Mythology bases most of its myths on morality and ethics issues. Unlike Egyptian Mythology, the Greeks did not focus on what was going to happen in their afterlife. They were more concerned with the here and now. There was no written special commandments in Greek Mythology. The Greeks did, however, base most of their moral and ethical ideals on the Iliad and the Odyssey, both written by Homer. In his work, Homer says that man holds his own fate in his hands. He portray ...
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  • Humanitiesgrecoroman Culture - 1,208 words
    Humanities/Greco-Roman Culture Lysistrata Aristophanes was a "craft" comedy poet in the fourth century B.C. during the time of the Peloponnesian War. Aristophanes' usual style was to be too satirical, and suggesting the outlandish. He shows little mercy when mocking Socrates and his "new-fangled ideas" which were most likely designed to destroy the cohesiveness of society and lead to anarchy, in his play The Clouds. The most absurd and humorous of Aristophanes' comedies are those in which the main characters, the heroes of the story, are women. Smart women. One of the most famous of Aristophanes' comedies depicting powerfully effectual women is the Lysistrata, named after the female lead cha ...
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  • Humanitiesgrecoroman Culture Lysistrata Aristophanes Was A Craft Comedy Poet In The Fourth Century Bc During The Time Of The - 1,207 words
    Humanities/Greco-Roman Culture Lysistrata Aristophanes was a "craft" comedy poet in the fourth century B.C. during the time of the Peloponnesian War. Aristophanes' usual style was to be too satirical, and suggesting the outlandish. He shows little mercy when mocking Socrates and his "new-fangled ideas" which were most likely designed to destroy the cohesiveness of society and lead to anarchy, in his play The Clouds. The most absurd and humorous of Aristophanes' comedies are those in which the main characters, the heroes of the story, are women. Smart women. One of the most famous of Aristophanes' comedies depicting powerfully effectual women is the Lysistrata, named after the female lead cha ...
    Related: aristophanes, comedy, craft, greek culture, lysistrata, poet, roman culture
  • Lysistrata - 1,204 words
    Lysistrata Aristophanes was a "craft" comedy poet in the fourth century B.C. during the time of the Peloponnesian War. Aristophanes' usual style was to be too satirical, and suggesting the outlandish. He shows little mercy when mocking Socrates and his "new-fangled ideas" which were most likely designed to destroy the cohesiveness of society and lead to anarchy, in his play The Clouds. The most absurd and humorous of Aristophanes' comedies are those in which the main characters, the heroes of the story, are women. Smart women. One of the most famous of Aristophanes' comedies depicting powerfully effectual women is the Lysistrata, named after the female lead character of the play. It portrays ...
    Related: lysistrata, role model, internal conflict, social values, cohesiveness
  • Lysistrata - 1,204 words
    Lysistrata Aristophanes was a "craft" comedy poet in the fourth century B.C. during the time of the Peloponnesian War. Aristophanes' usual style was to be too satirical, and suggesting the outlandish. He shows little mercy when mocking Socrates and his "new-fangled ideas" which were most likely designed to destroy the cohesiveness of society and lead to anarchy, in his play The Clouds. The most absurd and humorous of Aristophanes' comedies are those in which the main characters, the heroes of the story, are women. Smart women. One of the most famous of Aristophanes' comedies depicting powerfully effectual women is the Lysistrata, named after the female lead character of the play. It portrays ...
    Related: lysistrata, cultural aspect, peloponnesian war, city state, smart
  • Nazi Art - 1,073 words
    ... o represent Nazi ideas such as the Aryan body, healthy and beautiful. The male would be strong and active, a superman, either a warrior, proud and heroic reaping victory after victory or participating in sport and shaping the body for battle in a friendly competition that would help shape his opponent preparing him for the same battle. And the female would be the lovely Nordic superwoman, a mother to birth and teach a generation of men for work and battle. Another popular theme in Nazi art was the German landscape. Hitler was very fond of the snow covered peaks of the Alps, but the portrait and genre paintings are of more political and historical significance. Paintings of various figure ...
    Related: nazi, third reich, historical significance, york harper, superiority
  • Of The Many Types Of Entertainment And Past Times We Have Today, Theatre Is Still One - 1,334 words
    Of the many types of entertainment and past times we have today, theatre is still one of the most loved. For this we have to thank the very earliest forms of ancient Greek and Roman theatre. These ancient time plays were staged often in honor of a god and have paved the way for theatre as we know today. A particular aspect that has had a remarkable effect on the way theatre has evolved is the architecture of ancient theatres. The architecture of ancient Greek and Roman theatres have had a remarkable effect on future theatre designs including the architecture of the great Elizabethan theatres. The Elizabethan time period in England was ever so popular and well accepted that specialised theatr ...
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  • Roman Art Vs Greek Art - 1,178 words
    Roman Art Vs. Greek Art Paul Johnson Debbie Barret-Graves Western Civilization 10/29/00 Roman Art Vs. Greek Art Throughout history art has consistently reflected the cultural values and social structures of individual civilizations. Ancient art serves as a useful tool to help historians decipher some important aspects of ancient culture. From art we can determine the basic moral and philosophical beliefs of many ancient societies. The differences in arts purpose in Greece and Rome, for example, show us the fundamental differences in each cultures political and moral system. The primary objective of Greek art was to explore the order of nature and to convey philosophical thought, while Roman ...
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