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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: propaganda

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  • Nazi Art As Propaganda - 1,167 words
    Nazi Art As Propaganda Nazi Germany regulated and controlled the art produced between 1933 and 1945 to ensure they embodied the values they wished to indoctrinate into the German people. The notion of volk (people) and blut und boden (soil and blood) was championed in paintings to glorify an idealized rural Germany and instill a sense of superiority in the Nordic physicality. Highly veristic and asthetisized works romanticized everyday subjects and reiterated redundant stereotyped Nazi ideals of the human body and its purposes in the Reich. Paintings of Adolf Hitler valorized and his image to heroic status, even to the extent of deification, elevating him to a god-like status. By promoting H ...
    Related: nazi, nazi germany, nazi ideology, propaganda, political ideology
  • Nazi Art As Propaganda - 1,175 words
    ... d by the swastika) bring light and order to chaos. This is a simplistic glorified portrayal of Hitler, constructed to initiate a sense of awe within those that saw it, and encouraged a link between Hitler and religion. Another painting that uses a similar tactic is Hermann Otto Hoyers In the Beginning Was the Word in which Hitler is again linked to God through his words of power. These paintings act to legitimize the power of the National socialists by equating Hitler with the righteousness of God, and construct a pseudo-religion to be followed without question. Hitler as a superior being is also illustrated in Lanzingers The Flag Bearer. The painting portrays Hitler (the leader and repr ...
    Related: nazi, nazi germany, nazi ideology, nazi party, propaganda
  • Propaganda - 1,469 words
    Propaganda Though propaganda has never been a substitute for military strength, extensive resources, or skillful negotiation, it has often played an important role in wartime strategy.(Propaganda,1) Propaganda really influnced both sides of World War II. In this paper I will show why the Nazi party best benifited from the use of prapaganda. Adolf Hilter use it to turn people against jews, blacks and about every one else that was not German and he also use it to make people want to join Nazi army. Franklin Roosvelt or F.D.R also use the science of propaganda to turn people against Germany, Italy and Japan. Hitler had first become aware of propaganda and its uses before the First World War. Du ...
    Related: propaganda, hitler youth, creative arts, world war ii, communal
  • Propaganda In Animal Farm - 623 words
    Propaganda In Animal Farm The term propaganda is sometimes brought up in casual conversation, however, many do not realize the potential power that propaganda can have. Merriam-Webster defines propaganda as the spreading of ideas, information, or rumor for the purpose of helping or injuring an institution, a cause, or a person. In the novel Animal Farm by George Orwell, propaganda is shown to indeed cause harm. An examination of various sections of the book will be conducted in order to demonstrate three aspects of propaganda: how it is used by Snowball to positively obtain the control of Animal Farm; how Napoleon uses it in a sinister way to exile Snowball and his paradigm and to show Napol ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, propaganda, george orwell, positive attitude
  • Propaganda In China During The Cultural Revolution Took On Many - 2,409 words
    Propaganda in China during the Cultural Revolution took on many forms; there were mass Red Guard demonstrations in Tianamen Square in support of Mao Zedong, pictures of Mao were put up in every conceivable location from restaurants to the wallpaper in nurseries, and pamphlets and books of Mao's teachings were distributed to every Chinese citizen. One of these propaganda publications Quotations from Chairman Mao which later became known as the Little Red Book contained quotes from Mao Zedong and was distributed to every Chinese citizen. The history of the Red Book provides one of the best ways in which to analyze Chinese propaganda during the Cultural Revolution and see the ways in which the ...
    Related: china, chinese revolution, cultural revolution, propaganda, russian revolution
  • Propaganda In China During The Cultural Revolution Took On Many - 2,519 words
    ... n Biao (Dutt and Dutt, 1970: 80). Mao rightly saw that the best way to provide both direction for the Red Guards and to make himself immune from their attacks upon party official would be to foster a personality Cult. Thus under the guidance of Lin Biao who after Liu Shaoqi was removed; become the successor to Mao Lin Biao helped foster a personality Cult for Mao. Lin Biao used the same types of techniques that he used in the army to help foster this Cult of Mao. Lin Biao used the same organization to disseminate propaganda that he had devised for the Army. Lin Biao continued to head the army till his death in 1971 but his role was expanded as he became the high priest of the Cult of Mao ...
    Related: china, cultural revolution, propaganda, chinese people, national conference
  • The Use Of Propaganda In The Nazi Regime - 1,498 words
    The use of propaganda in the Nazi Regime subject = history:Holocaust title = The use of propaganda in the Nazi Regime and in their Totalitarian Control papers = The Role of Propaganda in the Nazi Takeover and in Their Totalitarian Control When one thinks of the term "propaganda", what comes to mind? Would it bring a positive response? Would it bring a negative response? When one thinks of "propaganda" in association with the Holocaust, what comes to mind? A positive response or a negative response? Most likely a negative response. Why is "propaganda" any different from what any political party or regime does, namely to disseminate its views? Is "propaganda" simply the name we give to views w ...
    Related: nazi, nazi germany, nazi ideology, nazi party, nazi propaganda, propaganda, regime
  • The Use Of Propaganda In The Nazi Regime - 1,484 words
    ... . That person was usually Joseph Goebbles. Naturally, no Jews, non-Aryans, or any of Hitlers adversaries were not allowed to join. Thus, without a license to practice their businesses, all artists, writers, publishers, producers, or directors could not work or do any business in their field. Also along with those quotas, came the prohibition of all Jewish newspapers, radio, and cinema. Part of Hitlers master plan was to have his nation to become the most powerful country in the world; an Aryan nation, that is. Without a doubt, that requires more Aryans. As a part of this theory, the fuhrer, with much assistance form Goebbles, began a new campaign. This time, it was aimed at women. Hitler ...
    Related: nazi, nazi party, nazi propaganda, propaganda, regime
  • Wartime Propaganda: World War I - 1,740 words
    Wartime Propaganda: World War I Wartime Propaganda: World War I The Drift Towards War Lead this people into war, and they'll forget there was ever such a thing as tolerance. To fight, you must be brutal and ruthless, and the spirit of ruthless brutality will enter into the very fiber of national life, infecting the Congress, the courts, the policeman on the beat, the man in the street. It is one of history's great ironies that Woodrow Wilson, who was re- elected as a peace candidate in 1916, led America into the first world war. With the help of a propaganda apparatus that was unparalleled in world history, Wilson forged a nation of immigrants into a fighting whole. An examination of public ...
    Related: first world, old world, wartime, world history, world war i
  • Wartime Propaganda: World War I - 1,751 words
    ... enemy. So great are the psychological resistances to war in modern nations, wrote Lasswell that every war must appear to be a war of defense against a menacing, murderous aggressor. There must be no ambiguity about who the public is to hate. American propaganda was not the only source of anti-German feeling, but most historians agree that the CPI pamphlets went too far in portraying Germans as depraved, brutal aggressors. For example, in one CPI publication, Professor Vernon Kellogg asked will it be any wonder if, after the war, the people of the world, when they recognize any human being as a German, will shrink aside so that they may not touch him as he passes, or stoop for stones to ...
    Related: first world, modern world, wartime, world war i, american military
  • 1776 Vs 1789 - 1,691 words
    1776 vs 1789 The American and French Revolutions both occurred in the eighteenth century; subverting the existing government and opening the way for capitalism and constitutionalism. Because of these similarities, the two revolutions are often assumed to be essentially eastern and western versions of each other. However, the two are fundamentally different in their reason, their rise, progress, termination, and in the events that followed, even to the present. The American Revolution was not primarily fought for independence. Independence was an almost accidental by-product of the Americans attempt to rebel against and remove unfair taxes levied on them by British Parliament. Through propaga ...
    Related: working class, middle class, great britain, master, propaganda
  • 1928 Election - 910 words
    1928 Election AP American History October 21, 1997 The year of 1828 was a tumultuous year in American politics. It so happened that it was a presidential election year. The election of 1828 was different from any other presidential election up to that point. The election not only set a precedent, but was also one of the bitterest in American history. Out of all the elections up to that point, it had all the makings of a present-day campaign. The two modern aspects evident in the campaign were horrific mudslinging and the choice of presidential electors by a popular vote. The two men running for the office of president that year were the incumbent, John Adams, and the once-defeated Andrew Jac ...
    Related: election, presidential election, john adams, current issues, russia
  • 1984 - 1,273 words
    1984 Jean-Marie Lauria Professor Rednour Western Enlightenment April 20, 2001 Tyrants, Communism, Big Brother, Stalin, and 1984 In George Orwells, 1984, no individual freedoms are present. It mirrors mid twentieth century Europe during World War II and its affects. Winston the main character who is a 39-year-old man, was neither remarkable in intelligence nor character, but is disgusted with the world he lives in. He works in the Ministry of Truth, where history and the truth are rewritten to fit the party's beliefs. This is an example of the use of propaganda to fit the need of the government during World War Two. Winston is aware of the falsehoods, because it is his job to make them true. ...
    Related: 1984, love affair, third stage, century europe, smith
  • 1984 - 1,219 words
    ... statements that change every day. The other reason for the diary is so that in the future, people will be able to read what really, and to inform them about beliefs on the party. Like Winston, I believe George Orwell wrote 1984 in order to allow a communist country to be revealed, the Soviet Union. Orwells goal was to expose the falsehoods of the Soviet Union as the model of a socialist state. He also wanted to reveal the dangers of totalitarianism, the deterioration of objective truth, and the well thought-out manipulation of Oceanias common peoples through propaganda. The Ministry of Truth is where history and facts both significant and insignificant are rewritten to reflect the party' ...
    Related: 1984, critical essays, power over, winston smith, scare
  • 1984 - 1,015 words
    1984 1. Biography George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair, a British writer with political conscience. He was born in India but educated in England at Eton College. He served the Indian Imperial Police in Burma from 1922 to 1927. In sick health, he returned to Europe to live in poverty as a struggling writer. Orwell joined the Republican forces in the Spanish civil war, and wrote a chilling account of this experience. He went on to write many books, mostly autobiographical, and achieved successes as a brilliant writer. 2. Synopsis The novel takes place in a theoretical and fictional dystopian totalitarian society. The story begins in London on April 4, 1984 after an atomic world w ...
    Related: 1984, erich fromm, middle class, first person, arthur
  • 1984 - 1,144 words
    1984 1984, by George Orwell (Pen Name), is a dystopian (opposite of utopia, imperfect) novel that presents the reader with a sense of despair for the characters. George Orwell, whose actual name is Eric Arthur Blair, was born in Motihari, India, June 25, 1903and died in London, England, January 21,1950. He was a prominent author in the 1940s of two satires that attacked the idea of totalitarianism. The novels and essays and such written in the 1930s established him as an influential voice of the century. Orwells' parents were members of the Indian Civil Service; he went to college in London and after wards joined the imperial police. During his service, he wrote his first novel, Down and out ...
    Related: 1984, eric arthur blair, animal farm, lower class, shop
  • 1984 - 834 words
    1984 "Few novels written in this generation have obtained a popularity as great as that of George Orwells 1984." George Orwells popular and powerful novel was not just a figment of his imagination, it was spawned from many experiences from childhood to early adulthood, as well as from events circa World War II. At age eight, he was shipped off to boarding school where he was the only scholarship student among aristocrats. This was Orwells first taste of dictatorship, of being helpless under the rule of an absolute power. Unlike his classmates, Orwell was unable to afford to go to Oxford or Cambridge and his grades kept him from winning any more scholarships (Scott-Kilvert, 98). Therefore, he ...
    Related: 1984, early adulthood, marshall cavendish corporation, methods used, police
  • 1984 - 1,513 words
    1984 Nineteen Eighty-Four is a compelling novel, written in the period just after W.W.II. It details the life of one man, Winston Smith, and his struggles with an undoubtedly fascist government. The book is set approximately in the year 1984, in which Winston's society is ruled by a governing force known as The Party. At the head of this government is a fictional figure known as Big Brother, to whom all citizens must love and respect. In this society, privacy and freedom do not exist. People are constantly monitored by telescreens, and subjected to a constant barrage of propaganda. Any devious thought or action is dealt with by cruel and deadly punishment. Winston is a worker in one of the g ...
    Related: 1984, government agencies, specific purpose, big brother, history
  • 1984 Abstract - 616 words
    1984 Abstract Book Review of 1984 (5/97) One year before his death in 1950, George Orwell published a book entitled 1984. Since then, the novel has become a bible to people all over the world. The enthusiasm is not only due to the fact that the novel is written so eloquently, and with such foresight, but also because it makes a bold statement about humanity. 1984s main character is Winston Smith, a man who doubts the righteousness of the totalitarian government (Big Brother) that rules Oceania, one of three superstates in the world of 1984. We begin the book with Winston, and learn that Big Brother is quite fictional. The government has developed its own language, is at constant war with the ...
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  • 1984 By George Orwell - 905 words
    1984 By George Orwell George Orwell was not only a writer, but also an important political reformer. Orwell was born in India in 1903. He considered his family a lower-middle class family. He said this because his family was a part of the middle class, but had little money. His father worked for the British government and was able to be apart of the middle class without money. Orwell lived in Britain and went to boarding school there on scholarships. He was the poorest student among many wealthy children. Orwell felt like an outsider at the boarding schools he went to. The students were all kept in line by beatings. This was Orwell's first taste of dictatorship, being helpless under the rule ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, winston smith, middle class
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