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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: prenatal care

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  • A Cultural Study Of Childbirth In Rural Mexico - 1,567 words
    A Cultural Study of Childbirth in Rural Mexico Outline I. make up of a typical home A. living arrangements B. layout of the home II. starting a family A. new home B. becoming pregnant III. child birth A. midwife B. birth setting C. prenatal care D. birth of the child E. postpartum IV. conclusions The rural Mexican culture is made up of many small towns and villages. The social connections among adults in theses areas are relatively intimate because many of these areas are endoga mous communities. Most newly married couples live with the man's parents until they are financially stable enough to purchase land of their own to build on. Though it is less common the couple may decide to live with ...
    Related: childbirth, mexico, rural, mexican culture, early childhood
  • Born First, Born Smarter - 636 words
    Born First, Born Smarter Born First, Born Smarter? The experiment that I read was Born First, Born Smarter. It was a study done by R. B. Zajonc and G. B. Markus in 1975. They planned to see why recent research had determined that the first-born child in a family related to certain characteristics. It was round that first-born children tend to be more verbally articulate, less impulsive, more active, better performers in school, more likely to go to college, and tend to have a greater need to achieve. It was also found that earlier-born children tend to score higher on tests of intelligence and aptitude than those born into the family later. One of the things researchers looked at was the dif ...
    Related: smarter, birth order, school work, young child, evaluate
  • Childhood Education And Social Inequalities - 1,127 words
    ... g a mother. The parents who show this usually have children who speak less, have poorer cognitive and linguistic outcomes, are impulsive, aggressive, have social withdrawal, insecure attachments, and poor peer relationships. Maltreatment of children is another big risk-factor with significant bearing on the social class. Maltreatment is associated with aggression, and four times as many(about 20%) of maltreated children go on to become delinquent. The causes can be associated with biological psychological, and social bearings. There is no doubt that early maltreatment of children can affect their neurodevelopment as well as their behavior. If the parents have access to community resource ...
    Related: childhood development, childhood education, early childhood, social class, child behavior
  • Comparison Between Environmental And - 1,003 words
    Comparison Between Environmental And Intelligence is the level of competence, ability to learn or to some people it is how well an individual performs on an IQ test. The structure of intelligence is best subdivided into two significant categories. They are environmental and hereditary influences. Environmental differences can be divided into different factors. The deprivation model of social class and intelligence consists of three variables. These variables explain, in terms of environmental factors, development and performance which are correlated with social status. The first of these variables consists of the combination of birth order, nutrition, and prenatal care. Children who are firs ...
    Related: comparison, environmental, environmental factors, more important, cognitive development
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 1,797 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is a condition affecting children born to women who drink heavily during pregnancy. There are three criteria used to describe the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure and to make a diagnosis of FAS. The first of these is a pattern of facial anomalies, these features include:  Small eye openings  Flat cheekbones  Flattened groove between nose and upper lip  Thin upper lip These characteristics can gradually diminish as the child ages, but it is important to note that diagnosis does not change because of this. The second criteria is growth deficiencies:  Low birth weight  Decelerating weight ove ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol and drugs, alcohol syndrome, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome, prenatal alcohol exposure
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 1,768 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Preventable Birth Defect If women didnt drink anymore during pregnancy, there would never be another baby born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effect (McCuen 33). This is a very powerful statement. It is also a very simple cure for an alarmingly high birth defect that all women have the power to stop. Every year more than 40,000 American children are born with defects because their mother drank alcohol while pregnant (McCuen 34). That is 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births (McCuen 31). Many of these cases go undiagnosed It is also the number one cause of mental retardation in the United States, and one of the three leading causes of bir ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol dependency, alcohol syndrome, drink alcohol, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome
  • Hiv Transmission Prevention - 994 words
    HIV Transmission Prevention The percentage of HIV transmission from mother to child can be prevented in a number of ways. I. The AZT treatment is one way to prevent HIV. A. AZT is a drug that decreases mother to child transmission of HIV. B. AZT is given to the HIV positive mother throughout her pregnancy. II. HIV can be contracted through breast-feeding. A. There is a 14% chance of transmission of HIV from mother to child through breast-feeding. B. There are alternatives to breast-feeding, such as formula and a milk bank. 1. Alternatives to breast-feeding have their bad sides. 2. Breast-feeding can be made safer. III. HIV testing in pregnant women can lower HIV transmission from mother to c ...
    Related: prevention, transmission, yale university, health care, haven
  • Illegal Immigration And The Economy - 1,295 words
    Illegal Immigration And The Economy Illegal Immigration and the Economy Illegal immigration has become one of the key political issues of the 1990s, especially in border states such as California. The Bureau of the Census estimates that there are now 4 million illegal aliens living in the United States and that about 300,000 more settle permanently each year. Four million illegal immigrants is undeniably a large number of people, but it is far below the invading army of 8 million 10 million aliens regularly reported in the media and by anti-immigrant lobbyists. Illegal aliens constitute only about 1.5 percent of the 260 million people living in the United States. Myopic and xenophobic Americ ...
    Related: economy, global economy, illegal, illegal aliens, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy
  • Immigration Healthcare - 346 words
    Immigration & Healthcare Immigration & Health Care As many as 830,000 non-citizen immigrants are residents of California. Nearly one in five non-citizens, under the age of 65 in California, is covered by Medi-Cal. Medi-Cal is an essential source of healthcare insurance for millions of low-income, elderly, and disabled residents of California. Despite its anti-immigrant reputation, California has been among the most generous of the 50 states in providing public aid to needy non-citizens who lost benefits in the 1996 federal welfare overhaul. Under current law, legal immigrants are eligible for Medi-Cal if they meet income and other requirements established by the state. Illegal immigrants may ...
    Related: healthcare, immigration, bilingual education, last year, prenatal
  • Laura Purdy - 688 words
    Laura Purdy In Laura Purdys essay "Are Pregnant Women Fetal Containers?" the issue that is dealt with is the relationship between pregnant women and their unborn fetus. She feels that the womans rights to her body should outweigh the rights of the fetus. She argues that pregnant woman are treated like second-class citizens in our society and that medical decisions are placed upon them that are not necessary and unjust. Purdy also discusses the role of the fetus, the moral duty of the mother, the bias against pregnant women in our justice system, and societys role in the double standard. Many people think that women have an obligation to give up their rights to their bodies when they become p ...
    Related: laura, purdy, prenatal care, case scenario, workplace
  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome - 1,809 words
    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Imagine the thought of a mother going in to her childs room and kissing her baby good night. Expecting to hear the gentle breath of her baby all that she hears is silence. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden death of an infant under one year of age which remains unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history (Willinger, et al., 1991). More children die of SIDS in a year that all who die of cancer, heart disease, pneumonia, child abuse, AIDS, cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy combined. Many researchers now believe that babies who die ...
    Related: infant, infant death syndrome, sudden, sudden infant death syndrome, syndrome
  • Teen Pregnancy - 698 words
    Teen Pregnancy Programs That Work Now Some 63% of teen parents depended on public programs for medical needs and daily living expenses in 1992. This includes needs for formula, food, heat, and transportation. In Ohio, the state, private organizations and federally funded programs together provide assistance to pregnant teens and teen mothers. The programs make sure that the girls are eating well, receive prenatal care, and get encouragement to stay in school to secure a future for themselves and their children. There are private organizations and communities that have tried to fill the gaps of these national programs. A program in the Covington, Kentucky school district offers an example tha ...
    Related: pregnancy, teen pregnancy, school district, self esteem, kentucky
  • Teen Pregnancy - 399 words
    Teen Pregnancy I. The United States has the highest teen pregnancy rate in the western world with approximately 1 million adolescents becoming pregnant every year. II. Teenage mothers tend to have insufficient prenatal care. A. Mothers and unborn children suffer from malnutrition. 1. lack of information 2. lack of money B. Teenagers tend to slack on prenatal doctor's visits 1. less screening for potential problems. 2. less preparation and counseling C. Mothers do not received counseling on the actual birthing process. D. Important information on appropriate behavior for the mother is not received. 1. smoking 2. drinking 3. drugs III. Decreased prenatal care has many negative effects on child ...
    Related: pregnancy, teen pregnancy, social support, potential problems, infant
  • Teen Pregnancy - 1,178 words
    Teen Pregnancy Teen Pregnancy Thesis statement: Teenage pregnancy is a major concern in today's society; there are many ways to prevent teen pregnancy, many people to get advice from, and many decisions that a teen parent must make. Outline: I. Introduction II. Teenage Pregnancy A. Concerns about Teenage Pregnancy B. What helps prevent Teen Pregnancy C. Source of Advice and Support III. Stages of Pregnancy A. First Trimester B. Second Trimester C. Third Trimester IV. Challenges of Teenage Parenthood A. Parenthood Options B. Continuing Education C. Financial Problems V. Conclusion Teenage pregnancy is a major concern in today's society; there are many ways to prevent teenage pregnancy, many p ...
    Related: pregnancy, pregnancy complications, prevent teen, prevent teen pregnancy, teen pregnancy, teenage pregnancy
  • Teen Pregnancy - 1,224 words
    ... bes begin to develop cartilage, testes begin to descend into the scrotum, nails begin to grow over the tips of the fingers, and creases develop over the soles of the feet. Also, the fetus begins to demonstrate coordinated patterns of behavior that are similar to the cycles of activity and sleep of a newborn. The things mentioned are just an overall view of the trimesters. A woman's body undergoes a variety of changes to prepare for the growth, nourishment, and birth of a child. The teenage parent has a lot of challenges that must be overcame and decided, such as parenthood options, continuing education, and financial problems. These mentioned are just a few of the challenges a teenager f ...
    Related: pregnancy, teen pregnancy, social issues, birth control, rewarding
  • Teenage Pregnancy - 1,880 words
    Teenage Pregnancy Although the rate of teenage pregnancy in the United States has declined greatly within the past few years, it is still an enormous problem that needs to be addressed. These rates are still higher in the 1990's than they were only a decade ago. The United State's teenage birthrate exceeds that of most other industrialized nations, even though American teenagers are no more sexually active than teenagers are in Canada or Europe. (Gormly 348) Recent statistics concerning the teen birthrates are alarming. About 560,000 teenage girls give birth each year. Almost one-sixth of all births in the United States are to teenage women are to teenage women. Eight in ten of these births ...
    Related: pregnancy, pregnancy complications, pregnancy prevention, teen pregnancy, teenage, teenage pregnancy
  • Teenage Pregnancy - 633 words
    Teenage Pregnancy Recent statistics have shown a continuing increase in teen pregnancy in the United States. This increase is of particular concern because teen mothers and their babies face increased risks to their health. The birth rate for young teens (age 15 to 17) is steadily rising. Between 1986 and 1991, the rate increased by 27 percent (from a rate of 30.5 to a rate of 38.7 per 1,000 women). In 1991 (the most recent year for which data are available), nearly 4 in 100 girls ages 15 to 17 had a baby.(1) About 1 million teenagers become pregnant each year, and more than 530,000 give birth.(1) Nearly 13% of all U.S. births in 1991 were to teens.(1) Teenage pregnancy and birth rates in th ...
    Related: pregnancy, pregnancy complications, teen pregnancy, teenage, teenage pregnancy
  • The Beginning - 755 words
    The Beginning Prenatal development is the period in development from conception to the onset of labor. Perinatal period is the period beginning about the seventh month of pregnancy and continuing until about four weeks after birth. Postnatal development is the period in development the follows directly after birth. The germinal stage is the stage lasting about ten -fourteen days following conception before the fertilized egg becomes implanted in the uterine wall. The embryonic stage is the stage in which major biological organs and systems form. The fetal stage is the stage in which is marked by rapid growth and preparation of body systems for functioning in the postnatal environment. Viabil ...
    Related: birth weight, alcohol syndrome, pregnant woman, sampling, pervasive
  • Treatments Of Alcoholism - 1,277 words
    Treatments of Alcoholism On any given day in the United States... 10,657 babies are born. (US Census Bureau). Twenty of these babies are born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Twenty may seem as though it is not a lot, but when you compare it to the fact that this number is more than HIV positive, Muscular Dystrophy, Spina Bifida and Down Syndrome combine it creates a whole new parameter. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is a direct result of a womans competed disregard for the fetus. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS, hereinafter), is a series of both mental and physical birth defects that can include, but are not limited to, mental retardation, deficiencies in growth, central nervous system dysfunction, behavi ...
    Related: alcoholism, medical association, health statistics, substance abuse, depletion
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