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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: precursor

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  • The Most Extreme Precursor To The Reform Movement Was A Man By - 956 words
    The most extreme precursor to the Reform movement was a man by the name of Samuel Holdheim. He was born in 1806 in Kempo in the province of Posen. At a young age he studied at a yeshiva and received a Talmudic education. He began to study German and secular subjects after his marriage to a woman with a modern education. After their divorce several years later, he began studying at the University of Prague and Berlin and received a doctorate from the University of Leipzig. Following service in Frankfurt -Am-Oder he became a Landesrabbiner or chief Rabbi of Mecklenberg-Schewerin. In the year 1847 he became the rabbinate of a reform congregation in Berlin . At this point he already disapproved ...
    Related: precursor, reform, reform judaism, education after, religious life
  • A Triumphent Withdrawal - 1,409 words
    A Triumphent Withdrawal A Triumphent Withdrawal I have been one acquainted with the night. I have walked out in rain-and back in rain. I have outwalked the furthest city light. Acquainted with the night, by Robert Frost Anthology of American Literature (1010) Edward A. Robinson was the first most important poet of the Twentieth Century. He is a peoples poet his poems' characters often provide physiological portraits of fictional and historical characters suffering an isolation of some sort (990). Robinson is considered a transitional figure; he is the precursor of Modernist poetry. He uses the older traditional influences of form and rhyme and his poems are often simple and neat. However, in ...
    Related: withdrawal, best friend, robert frost, human experience, depth
  • Aids - 1,140 words
    ... rom a few days to several weeks and is associated with fever, sweats, exhaustion, loss of appetite, nausea, headaches, soar throat, diarrhea, swollen glands, and a rash on the torso. Some of the symptoms of the acute illness may result from HIV-1 invasion of the central nervous system. In some cases the clinical findings have correlated with the presence of HIV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid. Symptoms disappear along with the rash and other sings of acute viral disease. When the blood test for HIV-1 antibodies become available, researchers demonstrated the lymphadenopathy was a frequent consequence of infection with the virus. Scientist do not know what causes the wasting syndrome, but som ...
    Related: aids, immune system, human immunodeficiency, recent studies, regulation
  • Aids And Retroviruses - 1,286 words
    ... AP) to a cellular receptor. Receptor molecules can be proteins (glycoproteins), or the sugar residues present on glycoproteins or glycolipids. Some complex viruses, for example, Poxviruses and Herpesviruses may have more than one receptor-binding protein, therefore, there may be alternative routes of uptake into cells. The expression or absence of receptors on the surface of cells largely determines the tropism of most viruses, that is, the type of cell in which they are able to replicate.  Penetration Unlike attachment, viral penetration is an energy-dependent process; that is, the cell must be metabolically active for this to occur. Three mechanisms may be involved:  Tr ...
    Related: aids, genetic code, life cycle, immune system, replication
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,539 words
    Alzheimer`s Disease Alzheimers Disease is a progressive, degenerative disease that affects the brain. Individuals with AD experience a progressive and specific loss of cognitive function resulting from the differentiation of the limbic system, association neocortex, and basal forebrain. It is also accompanied by the deposition of amyloid in plaques and cerebrovasculature, and the formation of neurofibrillary tangles in neurons. Alois Alzheimer, a German doctor, diagnosed this disease for the first time in 1907. At that time it was considered a rare disorder. Currently, this tragic brain disorder affects approximately four million people; It is the most common type of dementia and the fourth ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, physiological processes, limbic system
  • Alzheimers Disease : Neurobiology, Causes And Treatments Of - 960 words
    Alzheimers Disease : Neurobiology, Causes And Treatments Of Alzheimers disease : Neurobiology, causes and treatments of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is one of the most common of the dementing illnesses. A progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain, causing impaired memory, thinking and behavior. A person with Alzhiemers Disease may experience personality and behavior changes, impaired judgment, confusion and difficulty finishing thoughts, following directions or even finding the right word to say in a conversation. Once advanced the sufferer may require a caretaker as daily chores become very difficult to accomplish. Evidence points toward amyloid as one of the main causes for the ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, diagnosis treatment, main causes, nitric oxide
  • Alzheimers Disease Is A Progressive Degenerative Disease Of The Brain That Causes Increasing Loss Of Memory And Other Mental - 564 words
    Alzheimers disease is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain that causes increasing loss of memory and other mental abilities. The disease attacks few people before age sixty, but it occurs in about twenty percent of people who live to age eighty-five. The disease is named after the German psychiatrist and neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer, who first described its effects on brain cells in 1907. Symptoms of Alzheimers disease come in three stages: early, late, and advanced. Early stages include forgetfulness of recent events, increasing difficulty in performing intellectual tasks such as accustomed work, balancing a checkbook or maintaining a household. Also, personality changes, inc ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimers disease, brain, progressive, personal hygiene
  • American Impressionism - 954 words
    American Impressionism In the years following the Civil War, American art underwent a fundamental shift. The traditional Romantic style of painting, which focused on portraying majestic scenes in stark, vivid lines and shapes, gave way to a new concern for light and atmosphere. It was the age of Impressionism. Impressionism was not indigenous to America. In fact, its origins lay in France, which had long been at the fore of artistic innovation. The French Impressionists threw off the shackles of traditional painting in favor of an airier, lighter style. The purpose of Impressionism was to convey the impression of an object by capturing the patterns of light and color on and surrounding it. T ...
    Related: american, american art, american artists, early american, great american, impressionism
  • Androstenodione - 718 words
    Androstenodione This past year a lot of things have happened in the world. President Clinton could possibly be impeached. Our government tried to once again take over Sadaam Hussein. And Mark McGwire hit 70 home runs to break Roger Maris record of 61. During this extraordinary event in the baseball world, one item of skepticism clouded the entire accomplishment. During an interview that he was giving next to his locker, a reporter noticed a bottle on the top shelf. This bottle was filled with a nutritional pill titled androstenedione, a legal dietary supplement that is a testosterone-producing drug that helps the body repair itself after workouts. This repairment, in turn, helps the person t ...
    Related: documentary evidence, olympic committee, international olympic committee, apply, clinton
  • Battle Of Britain - 1,285 words
    Battle Of Britain Battle of Britain Dunkirk-May 1940 In May of 1940 German forces invaded France. By the end of May Allied troops were cornered, on the coast, in the town of Dunkirk. They had been overpowered by the German blitzkrieg(Battle of Britain).Though German bombers had destroyed over 200 of the rescue armadas ships, the British still were able to evacuate 224,000 of their troops along with 123,00 French(Mosley 20). Though they had been forced to abandon most of their equipment and supplies on the beach, the British avoided the trap set by the Germans. This event was the precursor to the Battle of Britain. At this point, Germany felt that Allied forces were weak and if they were to i ...
    Related: battle of britain, britain, great britain, highly effective, royal navy
  • Beyond The Problem Of Evil - 3,962 words
    ... is caught in his illusion of volition . . . [This illusion], his assumption that free will exists, is also part of the calculable mechanism ( 106). When a misfortune strikes, we can overcome it either by removing its cause or else by changing the effect it has on our feelings . . .( 108). There are elements in each of these texts--e.g., the denial of free will, the rejection of the idea retributive justice, and the recognition of possibility of overcoming our emotional reactions rather than our external environment--which resonate with the sympathetic reader of Spinoza. And while, in later years, Nietzsche loses some of his positivistic fervor, we shall see that significant similarities ...
    Related: good and evil, spoke zarathustra, heavenly father, c. s. lewis, attain
  • Biology Molecule - 1,108 words
    ... covalent bond or a glycosiolic link -bond is angular and forms a spiral called an alpha helix -if it branches, amylopectin is formed -cellulose is a 1-4 linkage of beta glucose -this creates a straight strand and not a helix -these bonds are rigid and require special enzymes (cellulase) to break them -the position of the beta glucose molecules alternates Lipids: -humans rarely eat pure lipids -cell membranes are primarily lipid and lipids can easily enter cells, carrying a foods flavor with them -a diet should have less than 30% fat, 55-65% carbs, and 10-15% protein -lipids are important as a source of energy, insulation (adipose tissue), cushions for the internal organs, as a lubricant, ...
    Related: biology, molecule, heart disease, boiling point, blood
  • Canterbury Tales By Chaucer - 1,862 words
    ... ink the wine, that he has poisoned, and also die. Fragment VII The Shipman's Tale: a fabliau in which a merchant's wife offers to sleep with a monk if he gives her money; he borrows the money from the merchant, sleeps with the wife, and later tells the merchant (who asks for his money on returning from a journey) that he has repaid it to his wife! She says that she has spent it all, and offers to repay her husband through time together in bed. The tale seems written to be told by a woman, perhaps it was originally given to the Wife of Bath? The Prioress's Prologue and Tale: a religious tale, in complete contrast to the Shipman's. A little boy is killed by wicked Jews because he sings a h ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, chaucer, the canterbury tales, the pardoner
  • Clinical Chemistry In Medicine - 1,442 words
    Clinical Chemistry In Medicine Of the diagnostic methods available to veterinarians, the clinical chemistry test has developed into a valuable aid for localizing pathologic conditions. This test is actually a collection of specially selected individual tests. With just a small amount of whole blood or serum, many body systems can be analyzed. Some of the more common screenings give information about the function of the kidneys, liver, and pancreas and about muscle and bone disease. There are many blood chemistry tests available to doctors. This paper covers the some of the more common tests. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) is an end-product of protein metabolism. Like most of the other molecules i ...
    Related: chemistry, clinical, medicine, energy source, liver disease
  • Coleridge And The Explosion Of Voice - 1,753 words
    Coleridge And The Explosion Of Voice Coleridge and the Explosion of Voice Coleridge is so often described in terms which are akin to the word, "explosive," and by all accounts he was at times an unusually dynamic,charismatic and unpredictable person. His writings themselves could also betermed "explosive" merely from their physical form; a fragmented mass, some pieces finished but most not, much of his writing subject to procrastination or eventual change of mind. Today I want to address a moment in his life which produced, as Richard Holmes has characterized it, an explosion of his poetic talent[1]--Autumn 1799, when he first met Sara Hutchinson, and wrote, amongst other poems, the ballad, ...
    Related: coleridge, explosion, oral tradition, sir walter scott, ashamed
  • Convicting Raskolnikov Dostoevskys Views On Criminal Justice - 1,409 words
    Convicting Raskolnikov Dostoevsky's views on Criminal Justice At the close of Crime and Punishment, Raskolinkov is convicted of Murder and sentenced to seven years in Siberian prison. Yet even before the character was conceived, Fyodor Dostoevsky had already convicted Raskolinkov in his mind (Frank, Dostoevsky 101). Crime and Punishment is the final chapter in Dostoevsky's journey toward understanding the forces that drive man to sin, suffering, and grace. Using ideas developed in Notes from Underground and episodes of his life recorded in Memoirs of the House of the Dead, Dostoevsky puts forth in Crime in Punishment a stern defense of natural law and an irrefutable volume of evidence condem ...
    Related: criminal, criminal justice, fyodor dostoevsky, raskolnikov, doing good
  • Creatine Monohydrate - 1,043 words
    Creatine Monohydrate Creatine Monohydrate Creatine is a natural substance found in highest concentration in lean red muscle tissue of animals and humans in the form of creatine phosphate. When muscles are used to lift a weight, or perform any type of work, ATP, (Adenosine Triphosphate) is rapidly broken down to ADP (Adenosine Diphosphate) and energy is released. The amount of ATP stored in the muscle will only fuel a maximum effort such as weight lifting for 10 to 15 seconds. After that the muscle must rely on Creatine to restock its supply of ATP. ATP has three phosphate molecules to one molecule of adenosine. Energy is created when one of the phosphate molecules breaks away turning ATP int ...
    Related: creatine, adenosine triphosphate, athletic performance, heart disease, intensity
  • Darwins Theory Of Iq - 892 words
    Darwin's Theory Of Iq The famous naturalist Charles Darwin presented the theory of natural selection. He went on many journeys on sea and on land, following his interests of the nature and the change that happens in the nature, i.e., the change in species. Following his exposure to many different kinds of birds, insects and animals, he explained Natural Selection as presentation of favorable variations and the rejecting of injurious variations.(131). Darwin used analogies and metaphors to demonstrate that different alterations occurred in the same specie, which helped them to adapt to their surroundings. Darwin's theory of natural selection was based on the following facts: 1) organisms incr ...
    Related: charles darwin, daily life, food supply, sexual selection, suit
  • Dem Cotton Pickin Okies - 769 words
    'Dem Cotton Pickin' Okies Not only stock markets were affected by the Depression. The farming society may have been the ones who suffered the most. Not only their section in the bank had been destroyed, but also the dust had eaten up their homes, work place, and places of entertainment! When dust storms hit no one knew what the 1,000 feet high, black dust clouds were. Some thought life was ending, and others thought it was judgment day. This phenomenon was caused by the drought, which lead to the decline of farmers. The soil turned bad, and caused the Dust Bowl. The residents of the Midwest had to deal with this very dilemma and it was not easy at all. For the most part, families stayed in t ...
    Related: cotton, national economic, dust storms, migrant workers, enduring
  • Dementia - 1,524 words
    ... syndrome in DS (Beach, 1987). Later it was discovered that EOAD and DS share a common genetic pathology on chromosome 21 (see risk factors). Research in dementia began to revive in the early sixties. New causes of the dementia syndrome were recognized including progressive supranuclear palsy and normal pressure hydrocephalus. Prior to the 1960s dementia was still viewed as a chronic, irreversible and untreatable condition (Mahendra, 1984, P. 14). Accordingly, in the 1960s several writers in Europe called for a revision of the concept and emphasized that irreversibility should not be viewed as an essential feature of dementia. Another important change that took place in the 1960s concerne ...
    Related: dementia, transmitted diseases, based research, higher level, miscellaneous
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