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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: poll tax

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  • British Church In The 14th Century - 1,396 words
    British Church In The 14Th Century In the summer of 1381 a large group of peasants led by Wat Tyler stormed London. These peasants, unwilling to pay another poll tax to pay for an unpopular war against France and discontent with unfair labor wages, freed prisoners from London prisons, killed merchants, and razed the home of John of Gaunt, considered the creator of the poll tax. Perhaps more important, however, was the rebels attack on the Temple, a symbol of the British Church's wealth and power. The rebels burned the charters, legal records of the Church's vast land-holdings, stored within the Temple. This act - a religious building being targeted of in rebellion against a mismanaged, abusi ...
    Related: british, british society, political power, great schism, archbishop
  • Cari Sobczynski - 1,537 words
    ... of the main reasons of the success of the solid south was its emphasis on their past and the continuation of traditional government and upholding that legacy. More modernization continued through the turn of the century. There began to be good population booms in the urban areas. There was also a rapid expansion with industry. Cities were beginning to center themselves the new mills, railroads, and trading ports. Cotton mills spread across the South and grew into large operations with more efficient machinery. New advancements in agriculture allowed for it to become less labor intensive. Therefore, lessening the need for many hired hands. Those workers went to the new urban factories fo ...
    Related: democratic party, luther king, ku klux klan, boom, swing
  • Civil Disobedence - 480 words
    Civil Disobedence Throughout the history of the United States, there have been many times when citizens have felt the need to revolt against their government. Such cases of revolt took place during the times Henry David Thoreau. The reason for his revolution included discrimination against the community and Americans refusing to pay poll taxes to support the Mexican War. Thoreau used civil disobedience to change people's ideas and beliefs to stop the injustice brought against them and their nation. Civil Disobedience is defined as refusal to obey civil laws or decrees, which usually takes the form of direct action (Grolier's Encyclopedia Online). People practicing civil disobedience break a ...
    Related: civil disobedience, civil laws, david thoreau, henry david, philosophy
  • Civil Disobediance - 1,093 words
    Civil Disobediance Civil Disobedience I believe that civil disobedience is justified as a method of trying to change the law. I think that civil disobedience is an expression of one's viewpoints. If someone is willing to break a law for what they believe in, more power to them! Civil disobedience is defined as, the refusal to obey the demands or commands of a government or occupying power, without resorting to violence or active measures of opposition (Webster's Dictionary). This refusal usually takes the form of passive resistance. Its usual purpose is to force concessions from the government or occupying power. Civil disobedience has been a major tactic and philosophy of nationalist moveme ...
    Related: american civil, civil disobedience, civil government, civil liberties, civil rights, civil rights legislation, civil rights movement
  • Civil Disobedience - 4,710 words
    ... en the revolution is accomplished. But even suppose blood shed when the conscience is wounded? Through this wound a man's real manhood and immortality flow out, and he bleeds to an everlasting death. I see this blood flowing now. I have contemplated the imprisonment of the offender, rather than the seizure of his goods--though both will serve the same purpose--because they who assert the purest right, and consequently are most dangerous to a corrupt State, commonly have not spent much time in accumulating property. To such the State renders comparatively small service, and a slight tax is wont to appear exorbitant, particularly if they are obliged to earn it by special labor with their h ...
    Related: civil disobedience, disobedience, henry thoreau, poll tax, professions
  • Civil Disobedience - 281 words
    Civil Disobedience Civil Disobedience Civil disobedience is the refusal to obey civil laws. This refusal is in the form of nonviolence. People who use civil disobedience are usually protesting a law that they think is unjust. Usually, they are also willing to accept any penalty like imprisonment. Henry David Thoreau was born in 1817 at Concord, Massachusetts. He was Educated at Harvard University. During his early years Henry spent most of his time walking in the wilderness or talking with his mentor and friend Ralph Waldo Emerson. In July of 1846, Henry needed his shoes which had holes in them repaired. After the cobbler repaired the shoes Henry exited the store and was approached by Sam St ...
    Related: civil disobedience, civil laws, disobedience, david thoreau, american history
  • Civil Rights - 2,320 words
    Civil Rights Civil Rights Movement in the United States, political, legal, and social struggle by black Americans to gain full citizenship rights and to achieve racial equality. The civil rights movement was first and foremost a challenge to segregation, the system of laws and customs separating blacks and whites that whites used to control blacks after slavery was abolished in the 1860s. During the civil rights movement, individuals and civil rights organizations challenged segregation and discrimination with a variety of activities, including protest marches, boycotts, and refusal to abide by segregation laws. Many believe that the movement began with the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955 and ...
    Related: civil rights, civil rights movement, civil war, individual rights, rights movement, voting rights, voting rights act of 1965
  • Civil Rights - 1,047 words
    Civil Rights The 1960's were one of the most significant decades in the twentieth century. The sixties were filled with new music, clothes, and an overall change in the way people acted, but most importantly it was a decade filled with civil rights movements. On February 1, 1960, four black freshmen from North Carolina Agriculture and Technical College in Greensboro went to a Woolworth's lunch counter and sat down politely and asked for service. The waitress refused to serve them and the students remained sitting there until the store closed for the night. The very next day they returned, this time with some more black students and even a few white ones. They were all well dressed, doing the ...
    Related: civil rights, civil rights act, civil rights movement, constitutional rights, right to vote, rights movement, voting rights
  • Civil Rights Timeline - 1,392 words
    Civil Rights Timeline annon Jan. 15, 1929 - Dr. King is born - Born on Jan. 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Ga., he was the second of three children of the Rev. Michael (later Martin) and Alberta Williams King. Sept. 1, 1954 - Dr. King becomes pastor - In 1954, King accepted his first pastorate--the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Ala. He and his wife, Coretta Scott King, whom he had met and married (June 1953) while at Boston University. Dec. 1, 1955 - Rosa Parks defies city segregation - Often called 'the mother of the civil rights movement,' Rosa Louise McCauley Parks, b. Tuskegee, Ala., Feb. 4, 1913, sparked the 381-day Montgomery bus boycott that led to a 1956 Supreme Court order outl ...
    Related: 1965 voting rights act, civil rights, civil rights act, civil rights legislation, civil rights movement, right to vote, rights movement
  • Comparing The Daily Lives Of African American Women In The 1940s And Today - 1,960 words
    Comparing The Daily Lives Of African American Women In The 1940S And Today Comparing the Daily Lives of African American Women in the 1940s and Today For much of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in America, Black women were an after-thought in our nation's history. They were the mammies and maids, the cooks and caregivers, the universal shoulder to cry on in times of trouble. Often overlooked and undervalued, Black women were just ... there. African American women have come a long way. In the 1940s, women were treated as second-class citizens and Blacks faced discrimination everywhere they looked. They were not taught to be proud of being Black (Dressier, 1985). They had a hard time go ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american women, black women, comparing, daily life
  • Fight For Civil Rights - 1,219 words
    Fight For Civil Rights The Fight for Civil Rights The Civil Rights movement was a period of time when blacks attempted to gain their constitutional rights from which they were being deprived. The movement has occurred from the 1950's to the present, with programs like Affirmative Action. Many were upset with the way the civil rights movement was being carried out in the 1960's. As a result, someone assassinated the leader of the movement, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Many blacks were infuriated at this death so there were serious riots in almost 100 cities. President Johnson appointed the Kerner Commission to study the civil rights movement. The commission concluded that we are a two race soci ...
    Related: civil rights, civil rights act, civil rights movement, constitutional rights, equal rights, right thing, rights bill
  • Gandhi - 1,537 words
    Gandhi Gandhi Gandhi, lived from 1869-1948 and was also known as Mahatma Gandhi, was born in Porbandar, in the modern state of Gujarat, on October 2, 1869, into a Hindu family, Both his father and grandfather having been prime ministers of two adjacent and tiny states. After a modest career at school, he went to London in 1888 to train as a lawyer, leaving behind his young wife, whom he had married when she was in her teens. In London, Gandhi encountered theosophists, vegetarians, and others who were disenchanted not only with industrialism, but with the legacy of Enlightenment thought. They themselves represented the fringe elements of English society. Gandhi was powerfully attracted to the ...
    Related: gandhi, mahatma gandhi, rabindranath tagore, british india, species
  • Gandhi Teachings - 1,287 words
    Gandhi Teachings From Gandhi, to Gandhiji, to Mahatma and Bapu, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi has traveled the distance from being the national hero to a legend. Gandhi, in life, was much more. Gandhi was a thinker, a philosopher, and also a statesman. He believed he could lead only if he was a worthy leader. To be a worthy leader he had to be morally strong. As he used to say, "A liar could not teach his pupils to speak the truth, a coward can not train young men to be brave." So to be morally strong, he believed one has to be strong in spirit. To be strong in spirit, one must live in accordance with one's beliefs, by a strict code of conduct. With such an all-encompassing vision of life, ever ...
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  • Liberilism Vs Conservatism - 1,445 words
    Liberilism Vs. Conservatism When one thinks of liberals and conservatives it tends to be a comparison of entirely different views concerning every issue. Conservative thinking is regularly associated with the Republican Party while liberal thinking is regularly associated with the Democratic Party. Two such figures that come to mind whose views tend to put them on opposite sides of the political spectrum are presidents Herbert C. Hoover and Harry S. Truman. For example, Hoovers failure to intervene in the private sector of the economy during the infant stages of the Great Depression agrees with the conservative idea of a free market economy. In contrast, Truman continued Roosevelts liberally ...
    Related: conservatism, college education, early years, political spectrum, payment
  • Mohandus Karamchand Gandhi - 1,140 words
    Mohandus Karamchand Gandhi Mohandus Karamchand Gandhi was a major figure in Indian history. He was best known for his policy of passive resistance and civil disobedience against unjust laws set by the British government. He inspired other nonviolent movements notably the U.S. civil right movement of the 1950s and 1960s lead by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (Encarta 98). Gandhi was highly influential, some say responsible, for Indias gain of independence and the abolishment of untouchability, the lowest rank under the caste system. Gandhi was born to a middle-class Indian family in 1869 and married at the age of thirteen to Kasturbai Makanji. He began to study law at the University of London in ...
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  • Segregation And Discrimination In Texas - 1,598 words
    Segregation And Discrimination In Texas Segregation and Discrimination that effected Black Texans and Mexican Americans in Texas Historians have described the early twentieth century as the nadir of race relations in this country. Ironically, populism, which tried to create a biracial political coalition, helped to encourage segregation in the south. Attempting to prevent any coalition of blacks and poor white farmers, establishment Democratic politicians frequently demonstrated their Negrophobia by accusing blacks of having inherently inferior racial characteristics and warning that such innate flaws threatened society. There began a move to make African Americans outsiders, governed by pol ...
    Related: discrimination, segregation, south texas, texas, texas politics
  • The 26 Amendments Of The Us Constitution - 1,538 words
    ... the executive authority of such state shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies: Provided, that the legislature of any state may empower the executive thereof to make temporary appointments until the people fill the vacancies by election as the legislature may direct. This amendment shall not be so construed as to affect the election or term of any Senator chosen before it becomes valid as part of the Constitution. Amendment XVIII (1919) Section 1. After one year from the ratification of this article the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all territory subject ...
    Related: amendments, constitution, constitution amendment, house of representatives, services division
  • The Constitution Of The United States Of America - 811 words
    THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA I. Article 1: The Legislative Branch a. section 1: Legislative powers given.. b. section 2: Description of the House of Representatives. -Representatives elected every 2nd year -Qualifications of Representatives -Must be a citizen for at least seven years -Must be at least 25 years old -Will not be inhabitant of the state in which he is chosen -Number of Representatives per state -Executive authority fills vacancies -Choose speaker and officers, Sole power to impeach. c. section 3: Description of the Senate -Separation and replacement of senators -Qualifications of Senators -Must be a citizen for at least nine years -Must be at least 30 years ...
    Related: america, constitution, state legislature, united states of america, poll tax
  • The French Revolution - 780 words
    The French Revolution Introduction The French Revolution was a turning point in France's history. The Revolution began when King Louis XVI called the Estates General to provide money for his bankrupt government. Between 1789 and 1799 many kings, queens, nobles, and clergyman lost their power and status in France. France's government changes drastically over the ten years the war was fought and it will never be the same. Description By the end of 1788, France was on the verge of bankruptcy. King Louis was a very indecisive and shy king. He didn't care much for politics or people. Through his carelessness Louis chose officials who stole money from him and France. Since France had no money and ...
    Related: french government, french revolution, european history, national assembly, rank
  • Thoreau - 1,048 words
    Thoreau He spent his life in voluntary poverty, enthralled by the study of nature. Two years, in the prime of his life, were spent living in a shack in the woods near a pond. Who would choose a life like this? Henry David Thoreau did, and he enjoyed it. Who was Henry David Thoreau, what did he do, and what did others think of his work? Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts on July 12, 1817 ("Thoreau" 96), on his grandmother's farm. Thoreau, who was of French-Huguenot and Scottish-Quaker ancestry, was baptized as David Henry Thoreau, but at the age of twenty he legally changed his name to Henry David. Thoreau was raised with his older sister Helen, older brother John, and you ...
    Related: david thoreau, henry david thoreau, henry thoreau, thoreau, civil disobedience
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