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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: awakening

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  • Avian Symbolism In The Awakening - 1,142 words
    Avian Symbolism in The Awakening Kate Chopin consistently uses avian symbolism in the novel The Awakening to represent and Enlighten Edna Pontellier. She begins the novel with the image of a caged bird and throughout the story other birds and avian images appear representing freedom, failure, and choices that Edna, the storys main character, must make. Throughout The Awakening Chopin uses flight and descriptions of birds to express the psychological state of mind of her main character, Edna Pontellier. As the story begins we are immediately introduces to the importance of avian symbolism. The first spoken sentences of the novel, are curiously enough, squawked by a parrot rather than a main c ...
    Related: avian, awakening, symbolism, the awakening, free will
  • Awakening - 816 words
    Awakening When faced with the question of "which novel did I have the greatest reaction to this semester?", the first story that came to mind was The Awakening. Although written from the perspective of a woman, I found that this story rendered my greatest emotional appeal. It is a story of a woman, Edna Pontellier, who transforms herself from an obedient housewife to a person who is alive with strength of character and emotions that she no longer has to suppress. The metamorphosis is shaped by her surroundings. It is the narrow minded view of society in Victorian times that makes this story possible. Just as her behavior is more shocking and horrifying because of her position in society, it ...
    Related: awakening, the awakening, kate chopin, victorian society, shocking
  • Awakening - 652 words
    Awakening The Awakening by Kate Chopin was considered very shocking when it was first published because of the "sexual awakening" of the main character, Edna Pontellier, and her unconventional behavior. Chopin moved to New Orleans after her marriage and lived there for twelve years until the death of her husband. She returned to St. Louis where she began writing. She used her knowledge of Louisiana and Creole culture to create wonderful descriptions of local color, and she incorporated French phrases used by the Creoles. The Awakening begins at Grade Isle, a vacation spot of wealthy Creoles from New Orleans. Edna is there with her two sons and her husband Leonce who comes and goes because of ...
    Related: awakening, the awakening, orleans after, kate chopin, chopin
  • Awakening And Suicide - 757 words
    Awakening And Suicide What is suicide? "(Suicide is) the act of self-destruction by a person sound in mind and capable of measuring his (or her) moral responsibility" (Webster 1705). "No one really knows why human beings commit suicide. Indeed, the very person who takes his (or her) own life may be least aware at the moment of decision of the essence of his (or her) reasons and emotions for doing so. At the outset, it can be said that a dozen individuals can kill themselves and "do" (or commit) 12 psychologically different deeds" (Encyclopaedia Britannica, 385). Suicide is written about in a variety of novels, short stories, and movies. Suicide moves like an undercurrent in the sea of themes ...
    Related: awakening, suicide, the awakening, encyclopaedia britannica, sylvan barnet
  • Awakening By Edna Pontellier - 1,092 words
    Awakening By Edna Pontellier There are many important paths that we must follow on our journey through life. We follow the path without questioning its intent. The path informs us when we should learn to talk, to walk, to marry, and to have children. We are told that we should never stray from it, because if we do, society will make it certain that we are bound for damnation. In the novel The Awakening the main character, Edna Pontellier, has followed this path without so much as a fuss. All that changes when Edna is awakened from a life long slumbera slumber, which she found repetitious, monotonous, and futile. She discovers that she is incomplete being just a wife and a mother. She needs t ...
    Related: awakening, edna, edna pontellier, pontellier, the awakening
  • Awakening By Edna Pontellier - 1,111 words
    ... mpson, Edna was changing, she thought of her marriage to Leonce as a safe haven, there was not excitement or passion. She feels trapped and needs to escape. Months passed and Edna became more and more enthralled in finding her identityshe neglected her duties as a housewife and those as a mother. She fought her way off of the path and found herself in the cruel, yet sometimes fulfilling wilderness. The only woman who understood the battle that Edna was about to endure was Mademoiselle Reisz. "Edna truly admires Mademoiselle Reisz. Edna appreciates her talent for playing the piano, while the other people on the Grand Isle dont appreciate her, because she does not fit their idea of what a ...
    Related: awakening, edna, edna pontellier, pontellier, mademoiselle reisz
  • Awakening By Kate Chopin - 407 words
    Awakening By Kate Chopin The book, The Awakening by Kate Chopin, is not so much a love story as it is a story of one woman. Mrs. Pontellier was a woman with emotional needs. Her needs include material, sexual, intimacy, and the need to be wanted or needed. Among Lonce Pontellier, Alce Arobin, and Robert Lebrun, she pursues and meets her needs. Although Lonce Pontellier didnt seem to play a part in her life, he did. He provided her materialistic needs. Just as she dreaded, he was her husband in the worlds eyes. It is plain to see that Edna finds marriage a revolting institution from this quote: Her marriage to Lonce Pontellier was purely an accident, in this respect resembling many other marr ...
    Related: awakening, chopin, kate, kate chopin, the awakening
  • Awakening By Kate Chopin - 405 words
    Awakening By Kate Chopin American Lit. Professor Claire Berger Michael L. Cosby 2. Trace Edna Pontellier's awakening. Edna awakening comes very soon in the story, because first of all Edna never feels connect to the wealthy Creoles of New Orleans. The whole life style of the Creoles just never fits to her and the type of person she is. Then on vacation, Edna starts to fall for a man named, Robert Lebrun. The mean part of her awakening is when she's on the beach and she realizes that she's is an individual. With her new feelings she starts to spend more time on herself like learning how to swim and disregards her children. After Robert left, she finds two new friends as well as a new house. W ...
    Related: awakening, chopin, kate, kate chopin, the awakening
  • Awakening By Kate Chopin - 1,585 words
    Awakening By Kate Chopin "Every step which she took toward relieving herself from obligations added to her strength and expansion as an individual" (93) The Awakening by Kate Chopin introduces the reader to the life of Edna Pontellier, a woman with an independent nature, searching for her true identity in a patriarchal society that expects women to be nothing more than devoted wives and nurturing mothers. In this paper I will describe Ednas journey of self-discovery and explain why her struggle for independence is no easy task. I will also discuss the relationship Edna has with two other main women characters and describe how these women conform or rebel against a society with many social co ...
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  • Awakening By Kate Chopin Focus - 635 words
    Awakening By Kate Chopin Focus Kate Chopins novel The Awakening relates the emotion-driven story of Edna Pontellier. Her story is a happy one. Not because of some typical fairy tale ending where they all live happily ever after, but in that she accomplished her goal in life. She never "sacrificed herself for her children." (p. 115) Edna Pontellier remained an individual. The music that was brought to her by Mademoiselle Reisz stirred up a deeper meaning in Edna's life. This is the point at which she feels her new being forming. In the end, not only did she realized that her new life had no place in this world, but that she would be happier in the sea, where there were no restrictions placed ...
    Related: awakening, chopin, kate, kate chopin, the awakening
  • Awakening By Kate Chopin Story - 743 words
    Awakening By Kate Chopin Story Throughout Kate Chopins, The Awakening, numerous scenes of birth and renewal are depicted. Various symbols placed throughout the book show Edna Pontelliers awakenings. For instance, many references are made to oceans and water. It is in the water that Edna has her first rebirth, but it is also the place where she chooses to die. Water symbolizes life, which is the reason that Ednas renewal takes place there, but it also symbolizes darkness and death. Birds, which are featured frequently in the story, symbolize Edna, and in many cases they foreshadow whats to become of her, or they show her renewal of life. The imagery of birds throughout the book is used to sym ...
    Related: awakening, chopin, kate, kate chopin, the awakening
  • Awakening Eyes - 1,737 words
    Awakening Eyes Awakening Eyes With few exceptions, our male dominated society has traditionally feared, repressed, and stymied the growth of women. As exemplified in history, man has always enjoyed a superior position. According to Genesis in the Old Testament, the fact that man was created first has led to the perception that man should rule. However, since woman was created from man's rib, there is a strong argument that woman was meant to work along side with man as an equal partner. As James Weldon Johnson's poem, "Behold de Rib," clearly illustrates, if God had intended for woman to be dominated, then she would have been created from a bone in the foot, but "he took de bone out of his s ...
    Related: awakening, the awakening, their eyes were watching god, self determination, role model
  • Awakening Eyes - 1,771 words
    ... t Joe requires her total submission [. . .] she retains a clear perception of herself and her situation that becomes her salvation in the end" (Wall 386). Initiating the process of stepping outside of herself and assessing her situation is the impetus for Janie to finally act in ways to improve her life. Joe's restriction "short circuits Janie's attempt to claim an identity of her own, robs her of the opportunity to negotiate respect from her peers. 'So gradually, she pressed her teeth together and learned to hush,'" but not for long (Wall 386). Finally, Janie steps up and initiates a new attitude. In her first confrontation with Joe, she declares that "Ah knows uh few things, and womenf ...
    Related: awakening, final phase, self assessment, book reports, absolute
  • Awakening To Freedom - 590 words
    Awakening To Freedom Jennifer Poisson Take-Home Essay Test En 262 05/02/2001 Awakening to Freedom Awakening or to awake means "to wake up; to be or make alert or watchful" (Webster 23). This is what Edna Pontellier experienced in The Awakening. There has been some discussion over the appropriateness of the ending to this story. Was it appropriate for Edna to commit suicide? Yes, this story of Edna Pontellier, including the ending, is appropriate to what a woman probably would have felt like if she were in that time feeling what Edna was feeling. Edna committed suicide because there was no other way out. She did not fit into society. Her thoughts and emotions were not the same as the thoughts ...
    Related: awakening, the awakening, edna pontellier, mademoiselle reisz, paint
  • Compare The Awakening To Madame Bovary - 1,203 words
    Compare The Awakening to Madame Bovary Kate Chopin's The Awakening and Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary are both tales of women indignant with their domestic situations; the distinct differences between the two books can be found in the authors' unique tones. Both authors weave similar themes into their writings such as, the escape from the monotony of domestic life, dissatisfaction with marital expectations and suicide. References to "fate" abound throughout both works. In The Awakening, Chopin uses fate to represent the expectations of Edna Pontellier's aristocratic society. Flaubert uses "fate" to portray his characters' compulsive methods of dealing with their guilt and rejecting of pers ...
    Related: awakening, bovary, compare, emma bovary, madame, madame bovary, the awakening
  • Conventionality Vs Instinct In Daisy Miller And The Awakening - 1,540 words
    Conventionality Vs. Instinct In Daisy Miller And The Awakening. Second Term Essay Henry James's Daisy Miller and Kate Chopin's The Awakening were first published twenty-one years apart, the former in 1878 and the latter in 1899. Despite the gap of more than two decades, however, the two works evince a similarity of thought and intent that is immediately evident in their main themes. Both works display characters whose lives have been governed almost solely by the conventions of their respective societies. Furthermore, both works also attempt to demonstrate to the reader what happens when these conventions are challenged by individual instincts, which more often than not are in direct contrad ...
    Related: awakening, daisy, daisy miller, instinct, miller, the awakening
  • Conventionality Vs Instinct In Daisy Miller And The Awakening - 1,562 words
    ... gin to make themselves felt. She begins to feel an attraction towards Robert Lebrun, and this becomes the catalyst for her internal struggle between conventionality and instinct. It is unthinkable for Edna, a married woman, to become involved with Robert. Her duty is to her husband and children. Her attraction for Robert, however, is too strong to allow her to simply dismiss him. She begins to contemplate the unthinkable, and thus begins the struggle between the conventions of her world and her new-found instincts. Her rebellion against conventionality does not end with her feeling for Robert, however, but spills over into other facets of her life. Thus Robert becomes the means through w ...
    Related: awakening, daisy, daisy miller, instinct, miller, the awakening
  • Kate Chopin And Awakening - 1,327 words
    Kate Chopin And Awakening A Style of her Own Kate Chopin uses symbolism and realism to enhance her theme of social conflict in the lives of women during the nineteenth century. These conflicts seemed to travel from one woman to the next, unnoticed by the rest of society. Chopin used these conflicts as a basis for all of her short stories and novels. This inevitably started turmoil about issues that never were brought out before. This, in turn, opened the eyes of society to the individuality of women. In The Awakening, by Chopin, a woman named Edna realizes that she is an individual and has individual feelings. She and her family lived at Grand Isle during the summer and her husband, Leonce, ...
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  • Kate Chopins The Awakening - 828 words
    Kate Chopin's The Awakening Many different symbols were utilized in Kate Chopin's The Awakening to illustrate the underlying themes and internal conflict of the characters. One constant and re-emerging symbol is the sea. The voice of the sea is seductive, never ceasing, whispering, clamoring, murmuring, inviting the soul to wander for a spell in abysses of solitude; to lose itself in mazes of inward contemplation. The voice of the sea speaks to the soul. The touch of the sea is sensuous, enfolding the body in its soft, close embrace (25). In the novel, the ocean symbolizes Edna's awakening to a life filled with freedom and independence. On a hot summer evening Robert and Edna go bathing. Alt ...
    Related: awakening, kate, kate chopin, the awakening, internal conflict
  • Kate Chopins The Awakening - 850 words
    Kate Chopin's The Awakening Kate Chopin's Awakening, depicts the life of a woman, Edna, in the early 1900's who revolts against the social status quo and leads the life of an independent female regardless of all the risks. It is a story that unfolds the two parts of her life, only to see them both fall apart. Thus we see the unreasonable conflict between her exterior world, the role of a wife and a mother that society has imposed on her and her interior reality of emotions and sexuality which initially are asleep and awaken through the course of the novel. For the arousal of each aspect, two men are responsible, Robert and Arobin, which correspond to the two sides of her existence. The compl ...
    Related: awakening, kate, kate chopin, the awakening, social status
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