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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: physical anthropology

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  • Athens - 750 words
    ATHENS THE ANCIENT CITY OF ATHENS is a photographic archive of the archaeological and architectural remains of ancient Athens (Greece). It is intended primarily as a resource for students of classical languages, civilization, art, archaeology, and history at Indiana University who may wish to take a "virtual tour" of the chief excavated regions and extant monuments. We also hope that this site will be useful to all who have an interest in archaeological exploration and the recovery, interpretation, and preservation of the past. Copyright All of the images presented here are from the personal slide collection of Kevin T. Glowacki and Nancy L. Klein. You are free to download and use unmodified ...
    Related: ancient athens, athens, athens greece, religion & politics, ancient world
  • Chicken Soup For The Soul - 1,429 words
    Chicken Soup For The Soul Anthropology may be dissected into four main perspectives, firstly physical or biological anthropology, which is an area of study concerned with human evolution and human adaptation. Its main components are human paleontology, the study of our fossil records, and human genetics, which examines the ways in which human beings differ from each other. Also adopted are aspects of human ecology, ethnology, demography, nutrition, and environmental physiology. From the physical anthropologist we learn the capabilities for bearing culture that distinguish us from other species. Secondly archaeology, which follows from physical anthropology, reassembles the evolution of cultu ...
    Related: chicken, soup, social relationships, cultural difference, achieving
  • Development Of Man - 1,731 words
    Development Of Man In the dictionary a human being is defined as a person showing qualities of people. But what exactly is a person or people? Do dictionaries go into detail about that? Where do we come from or why do we have ears? Scientists have been trying to answer questions like these for years, but everyone has a different opinion. Some say people originated from the very human like animal known as the Gorilla, others say we all came from an African American woman. But does anybody know for sure what we really came from or who we really are? The story of man first told to people and still told today is the story of Adam and Eve, God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed in ...
    Related: the bible, cultural anthropology, prehistoric man, mammal, bone
  • Domestication Of The Dog - 1,036 words
    Domestication Of The Dog Todays dogs serve as a number of different tools. We train dogs to see for the blind, we train them to sniff for drugs, we train them to save peoples lives, and we train them to be our faithful companions. There is no doubt that the dog has a wide variety of skills and jobs. We selectively breed the dog to gain the certain attributes we are seeking, and we know which dogs will perform the best at what we want them to do. The question is how long ago, and why did the dog become our aids, tools, and companions? Answering this question means dealing with the four fields of Anthropology: Ethnologically, Archaeologically, Physically, and Linguistically. The most obvious w ...
    Related: domestication, bronze age, physical anthropology, over time, multiple
  • Homohablis - 545 words
    Homohablis The next most recent ancestor of man is Homo habilis. The first ever fossil remains of Homo habilis were discovered in 1964 in Tanzania, East Africa by the Leakeys. Robert Jurmain wrote in his text book, Introduction to Physical Anthropology, Louis Leakey suggested that there was a Plio-Pleistocene hominid with a significantly larger brain then found in Australiopithecus. They made this claim based on the findings at Olduvai Gorge. Leakey and his team gave a new species name to the fossil remains The fossils of Homo habilis are different then those of the Australopithecines by several physical characteristics such as a larger cranial cavity, smaller rear teeth, and skeletal bones ...
    Related: genus homo, human brain, physical characteristics, earliest, genus
  • Neanderthals - 1,134 words
    Neanderthals Neanderthals I have never really had an interest in religion and the beliefs it is made of. This all leaves me confused at times. Religion explains the creation of humankind, since I have no religious beliefs then where does this leave me in thought about where I came from? Actually it left me no where. I have just recently taken an anthropology class the second semester of my freshman year at Montgomery College. I am just know gaining a belief in where and when man was created. Just think, most people are instilled with religion early in life, mostly by their parents or the schools that there parents make the attend at an early age. I have always been to stubborn to listen to a ...
    Related: homo sapiens, seventh edition, human family, throwing, technology
  • Richard Leakey - 457 words
    Richard Leakey Richard Leakey was born December 19, 1944 in Nairobi, Kenya. His parents were the esteemed anthropologists Louis and Mary Leakey. Richard first became a tour guide in Kenya, but changed his mind when he found an extinct human jaw. He then schooled himself by completing a two-year secondary education program in six months. From 1967-77 he and his co-workers dug up around 400 fossils, that accounted for 230 individuals. The most important discovery was an almost complete skull found in 1977, which Richard believe to be a new species called Homo habilis. Richard Leakeys accomplishments are discovering the crania of Australopithecus boisei in 1969 with the archaeologist Glynn Isaa ...
    Related: early homo, publishing company, homo habilis, director, blackwell
  • The Influence Of Writers On Charles Darwin - 1,125 words
    ... was impressed by Malthus' work and realized that the population theory could be applied to all aspects of organic life and provided a solid base in which natural selection could be studied. Darwin believed that the theories of biological variation combined with the struggle for existence explained the biological divergence found in organic life. Darwin had such strong beliefs in Malthus' theory that he used the population theory to help explain his own theory about natural selection in his book The Origin of Species (Darwin, 1859, p.13): In the next chapter the Struggle for Existence among all organic beings throughout the world, which inevitably follows from the high geometrical ratio o ...
    Related: charles darwin, charles lyell, darwin, erasmus darwin, scientific community
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