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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: pandemic

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  • The Flu Pandemic Of 1918 - 1,398 words
    The Flu Pandemic Of 1918 During the course of time certain incidents occur that change the course of our future and our thoughts. These incidents effect the population of the world either positively or negatively. Yet one event stood out to show how with the future brings both knowledge and power. Over the course of this century, scientific research has shown that modern medicine is not as exemplary as we would like it to be, since both we as people, and diseases are continuing a rapid growth or race to extinction of one another. For scientific comparisons, the 1918 Flu Pandemic will be the archetype. Since the beginning of time man has been haunted and tormented by one thing. Disease. Disea ...
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  • 1984 By George Orwell 1903 1950 - 1,843 words
    1984 by George Orwell (1903 - 1950) 1984 by George Orwell (1903 - 1950) Type of Work: Futuristic, cautionary novel Setting London, in the mythical country of Oceania; 1984 (in the future) Principal Characters Winston Smith, a rebel against society Julia, his lover Mr. Charrington, an elderly antique shop owner O'Brien, the only member of the Inner Party Winston trusts Story Overveiw As Winston Smith entered his apartment building, he passed a familiar poster. "It was one of those pictures which are so contrived that the eyes follow you about when you move. BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran." Then Winston opened the door to his flat to be greeted by a voice on his "teles ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, political system, totalitarian regime
  • Aids - 1,443 words
    AIDS Gonzales 1 The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was first discovered in 1981 as a unique and newly recognized infection of the body's immune system (Mellors 3). The name AIDS was formally know as GRIDS (Gay Related Immune Defiance Syndrome). The first case of AIDS was discovered in Los Angeles, where scientists from the CDC (Center for Disease Control) were called in on a half dozen cases. The CDC was convinced what they were seeing was a new strand of virus. None of the staff members had ever seen a strand of virus that could do so much destruction to the immune system like this one did. Many theories about this disease were in question. Many scientists believed it originated ...
    Related: aids, aids hiv, president clinton, health organization, sample
  • Aids Conspricay Is Aids Biological Warfare - 3,107 words
    Aids Conspricay - Is AIDS Biological Warfare? Refinance now homeowner even if you have bad credit. 185 loc Aids Conspricay - Is AIDS Biological Warfare? The following is a complete verbatim transcription from a recent broadcast of "Network 23", a program shown on a local Los Angeles Public Access Cable Channel. Good evening, I'm Michel Kassett. This is Network 23. A couple of weeks ago we had a program on the subject of AIDS, addressing the question of whether AIDS-the AIDS virus-was created by the government; and I'm sure that some people were quite shocked by what they heard. We spent that entire program relating to you the evidence of a very substantial amount of factual evidence which su ...
    Related: aids, aids research, biological, biological warfare, warfare
  • Aids In Africa - 1,109 words
    Aids In Africa As recently as 1990, there were some regions of the world that had remained relatively unscathed by AIDS. Today, however, there is not a single country around the world which has wholly escaped the AIDS epidemic. As the epidemic has matured, some of the developed nations which were hard hit by the epidemic in the 1980s such as the United States have reported a slowing in the rate of new infections and a stabilization among existing cases with lower mortality rates and an extension of post-diagnosis lifespan. However, despite the changing face of the global AIDS pandemic, one factor remains unchanged: no region of the world bears a higher AIDS-related burden than sub-Saharan Af ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids epidemic, east africa, saharan africa, sub-saharan africa, west africa
  • Aids Whats New Is The Message Getting Through We Already Know Enough About Aids To Prevent Its Spread, But Ignorance, Complac - 1,708 words
    AIDS - What's new ? ------------------- Is the message getting through? We already know enough about AIDS to prevent its spread, but ignorance, complacency, fear and bigotry continue to stop many from taking adequate precautions. We know enough about how the infection is transmitted to protect ourselves from it without resorting to such extremes as mandatory testing, enforced quarantine or total celibacy. But too few people are heeding the AIDS message. Perhaps many simply don't like or want to believe what they hear, preferring to think that AIDS "can't happen to them." Experts repeatedly remind us that infective agents do not discriminate, but can infect any and everyone. Like other commun ...
    Related: aids, whats, human cells, blood cells, usual
  • Bacterial Resistance - 637 words
    Bacterial Resistance Bacterial resistance is a problem that has profoundly impacted the medical community. Bacterial resistance results when bacteria become resistant to individual antibiotics through the development of specific defense mechanisms which render the antibiotic ineffective. This problem has become evident in recent years as numerous cases have been reported in which antibiotics are not effective against the bacteria that they have fought off for years. The recent troubles with bacterial resistance have caused panic throughout the United States. The pharmaceutical industry hasnt been producing many antibiotics because they thought that the antibiotics they had created had solved ...
    Related: antibiotic resistance, bacterial, resistance, pharmaceutical industry, over time
  • Bubonic Plague - 396 words
    Bubonic Plague The Bubonic Plague has killed more people than any other plague. During the 1300's, the Black Death, as they called it, killed nearly half the population of Europe. They called it the Black Death because of the dark color the people's faces would turn after they died. It is caused by rod-shaped bacteria, Yersinia Pestis. The Bubonic Plague is an acute and severe infection. It is carried by the fleas on infected rodents(rat, squirrel). If the rodent or flea bites a person then it can be passed from person to person from mucus droplets spread by coughing. When infected, the person becomes ill in a few hours to a few days. The bacteria spread throughout the body. The symptoms inc ...
    Related: bubonic, bubonic plague, plague, health organization, world health
  • Diversity Awareness - 1,238 words
    Diversity Awareness Diversity Awareness Billy J. Dycus, Jr. Debra Moore SW 322 September 29, 1999 Differences in our society are many, including age, religion, physical and mental abilities, gender, sexual orientation, income, family or social status, and physical appearance. Anyplace where differences are found leaves room for stereotypes. Stereotypes are generalizations about people usually based on inaccurate information or assumptions rather than facts. (Wei, 1996) Stereotypes do not take into account the great diversity of people within a group of people. Nor do stereotypes consider the present circumstances of the individual. Even worse, stereotypes can lead to prejudicial or discrimin ...
    Related: awareness, diversity, sexual orientation, african american, prejudicial
  • Ebola Virus - 1,094 words
    Ebola Virus Ebola virus, a member of the Filoviridae, burst from obscurity with spectacular outbreaks of severe, haemorrhagic fever. It was first associated with an outbreak of 318 cases and a case-fatality rate of 90% in Zaire and caused 150 deaths among 250 cases in Sudan. Smaller outbreaks continue to appear periodically, particularly in East, Central and southern Africa. In 1989, a haemorrhagic disease was recognized among cynomolgus macaques imported into the United States from the Philippines. Strains of Ebola virus were isolated from these monkeys. Serologic studies in the Philippines and elsewhere in Southeast Asia indicated that Ebola virus is a prevalent cause of infection among ma ...
    Related: ebola, ebola virus, virus, limited resources, life cycle
  • Ever Since The Dawn Of Time Man Has Found New Ways Of Killing - 1,021 words
    ... wo different types of fires, which are created when flammable materials are ignited by the thermal radiation. The first type is called firestorms. A firestorm is violent, has raging winds, and has extremely high temperatures; but fortunately it does not spread very rapidly. The second type is called a conflagration. A conflagration is when the fire spreads in a front (International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, 1982). The thermal radiation produced by the atomic bomb's explosion will account for most of the deaths or injuries. In Hiroshima and Nagasaki the thermal radiation accounted for approximately twenty to thirty percent of the deaths or injuries from the atomic bomb ...
    Related: dawn, last time, pope john, atomic bomb, atomic
  • Globalization - 1,405 words
    Globalization What are the function and problems within the globalization process? Globalization creates new challenges and opportunities for those people who are of greatest concern to the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement - that is, the Disadvantaged. The humanitarian players - that is, the UN system and its organisations, the Red Cross Red Crescent, NGOs - have several roles to play in relation to globalization. We should monitor the impact of globalization and help governments to strengthen safety nets and provide basic social services. We must reinforce our efforts to address the needs of vulnerable people and we must adapt our methods of assistance and do all we can to prevent additi ...
    Related: globalization, eastern europe, civil society, economic effect, macro
  • Gun Control - 1,089 words
    ... from fear. We are not free when consumers are manipulated by profit-motivated industries. In the New England Journal of Medicine, an important study of 743 gunshot deaths done by Dr. Arthur Kellermann and Dr. Donald Reay, found that 398 of these deaths had taken place in a home where the handgun was kept. It was not a criminal stranger who shot them, but instead family or relatives, spouses, roommates, or themselves. Altercations within the home accounts for 84% of these homicides. Of all 743 gunshot deaths, there were only two that occurred in homes involving intruders killed while attempting to enter, and nine deaths justified through police and court analysis. (95) What really justif ...
    Related: disease control, gun control, bodily harm, deadly force, medicine
  • How The Government May Have Created Aids - 4,554 words
    How the Government May Have Created AIDS The following is a complete verbatim transcription from a recent broadcast of "Network 23", a program shown on a local Los Angeles Public Access Cable Channel. FULL TRANSCRIPTION FROM NETWORK 23: Good evening, I'm Michel Kassett. This is Network 23. A couple of weeks ago we had a program on the subject of AIDS, addressing the question of whether AIDS -- the AIDS virus -- was created by the government; and I'm sure that some people were quite shocked by what they heard. We spent that entire program relating to you the evidence of a very substantial amount of factual evidence which supports the proposition that AIDS is a synthetic biological agent that ...
    Related: aids, aids research, american government, states government, united states government
  • How The Government May Have Created Aids - 4,360 words
    ... . Although decades have passed and untold billions have been spent in research, CANCER is still with us, the second major cause of death in America. The most dreaded fear that all oncologists (cancer doctors), virologists and immunologists live with is that some day CANCER in one form or another will become a contagious disease, transferable from one person to another. AIDS has now made that fear a reality and if you think you're safe because you're not gay or promiscuous, or because you're not sexually active, then you had better watch this videotape very carefully and then watch it again and again if necessary, until you fully understand what Dr. Strecker is telling you as he takes you ...
    Related: aids, world health, state legislature, molecular biology, agency
  • Russian Communism: Leninism And Stalinizm Is What - 1,306 words
    Russian Communism: Leninism and Stalinizm is what? Russian Communism: Leninism and Stalinizm is what? The specter is haunting Europethe specter of communism... So what is this specter called communism and how haunting is it really? The Websters Dictionary says that communism is a system of social organization in which all economic and social activity is controlled by a totalitarian state dominated by a single and self-perpetuating political party. Karl Marx says that communism is abolition of private property. Others say it is equal division of unequal earnings or it is an opiate of the intellectuals. Even some go so far as to proclaim that communism is a state form of Christianity. The bott ...
    Related: russian, private property, law enforcement, main theme, possessions
  • Sir Isaac Newton - 1,044 words
    Sir Isaac Newton Jan 4 1643 - March 31 1727 On Christmas day by the georgian calender in the manor house of Woolsthorpe, England, Issaac Newton was born prematurely. His father had died 3 months before. Newton had a difficult childhood. His mother, Hannah Ayscough Newton remarried when he was just three, and he was sent to live with his grandparents. After his stepfathers death, the second father who died, when Isaac was 11, Newtons mother brought him back home to Woolsthorpe in Lincolnshire where he was educated at Kings School, Grantham. Newton came from a family of farmers and he was expected to continue the farming tradition , well thats what his mother thought anyway, until an uncle rec ...
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  • The Nature, Transmission, Prevention, And Treatment Of The Hivaids - 1,500 words
    The Nature, Transmission, Prevention, and Treatment of the HIV/AIDS The Nature, Transmission, Prevention, and Treatment of the HIV/AIDS Arthur Ashe is an admirable and well known American tennis player who won many championships. He became the first African American male to win the mens Wimbledon title in 1975. Also, he was on the United States Davis Cup team from 1963 until 1984. Some of his other major accomplishments include helping to form what is now the Association of Tennis Professionals and winning the Australian Open, the United States Open, and the French Open. Ashe lived a wonderful and successful life: however, in 1983, disaster struck! Ashe acquired an incurable disease through ...
    Related: african american, people believe, acquired immune, microsoft, reproduce
  • The Nature, Transmission, Prevention, And Treatment Of The Hivaids - 1,495 words
    ... e transmitted by simply touching someone, going to school with someone, or even hugging someone. In order for HIV to be transmitted, an exchange of bodily fluids must occur. There is no other way. "Additionally, HIV is unable to reproduce outside its living host; therefore, it does not spread or maintain infectiousness outside its host" (Microsoft Corporation 7). It is also impossible for HIV to be spread by insects. Many people, however, believe that mosquitoes and other sucking insects can do so. However, HIV can only live for a short period of time outside of a cell, or host, and therefore, cannot infect the insect. So, if the insect is unable to be infected, then the insect is unable ...
    Related: side effects, central africa, urban areas, homosexual, reproduce
  • Using The Science Of Life As A Weapon - 1,413 words
    Using The Science Of Life As A Weapon I Introduction 1) Definition of Biological Warfare 2) Talking Points II Biological Weapons 1) Different Types Used 2) Applications III History of Biological Warfare 1) How It Has Been Used in Past Wars 2) How We Can Expect It to Be Used in the Future IV Are We At Risk of Being Attacked With Biological Weapons? 1) Defending Ourselves Against Biological Weapons V Conclusion Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) warfare is one of the most dreaded forms of attack on the battlefield. In the last century, we learned a great deal about how life works, how it is organized. We have used that technology to save many lives by curing diseases and vaccinating agains ...
    Related: science, weapon, present danger, south american, wartime
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