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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: ordinary

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  • An Ordinary Outlook - 1,013 words
    An Ordinary Outlook The movie Ordinary People directed by Robert Redford is a very real life movie set in the suburbs of Illinois in the late 1970s. The movie begins early December and ends what seems to me like the following spring. I think the significance of the seasons is that December, representing a dreary lifeless mood, at least for the northwest region, symbolizes death. During this time, Conrad experiences many confrontations with this matter. He has recently witnessed the death of his brother and is struggling to make his appearance seem normal. When the weather begins to get warmer, setting a more renewed atmosphere, Conrad begins to understand his emotions and, therefore, deals w ...
    Related: ordinary, ordinary people, outlook, real life, hard times
  • Antimatter Introduction Ordinary Matter Has Negatively Charged Electrons Circling A Positively Charged Nuclei Antimatter Has - 1,213 words
    Anti-Matter Introduction Ordinary matter has negatively charged electrons circling a positively charged nuclei. Anti-matter has positively charged electrons - positrons - orbiting a nuclei with a negative charge - anti-protons. Only anti-protons and positrons are able to be produced at this time, but scientists in Switzerland have begun a series of experiments which they believe will lead to the creation of the first anti-matter element -- Anti-Hydrogen. The Research Early scientists often made two mistakes about anti-matter. Some thought it had a negative mass, and would thus feel gravity as a push rather than a pull. If this were so, the antiproton's negative mass/energy would cancel the p ...
    Related: negatively, nuclei, ordinary, positively, black holes
  • Ordinary Men By Christopher Browning - 840 words
    Ordinary Men By Christopher Browning ORDINARY MEN by Christopher Browning Ordinary Men by Christopher Browning accounts for the actions of the German Order Police ( more specifically the actions of Reserve Police Battalion 101in Poland) and the role they played in the Second World War during the Jewish Holocaust. Police Battalion 101 was composed of veterans from World War One and men too old to be drafted into the regular forces: army, navy, air force. Browning himself is uncertain of the accuracy of information that he provides because he based his study on personal testimony recorded in postwar legal investigations. This also offers a biographical profile of a German unit that consisted o ...
    Related: browning, christopher, ordinary, second world, war crimes
  • Ordinary Men Or Willing Executioners - 1,263 words
    Ordinary Men Or Willing Executioners The arguments of Christopher Browning and Daniel John Goldhagen contrast greatly based on the underlining meaning of the Holocaust to ordinary Germans. Why did ordinary citizens participate in the process of mass murder? Christopher Browning examines the history of a battalion of the Order Police who participated in mass shootings and deportations. He debunks the idea that these ordinary men were simply coerced to kill but stops short of Goldhagen's simplistic thesis. Browning uncovers the fact that Major Trapp offered at one time to excuse anyone from the task of killing who was not up to it. Despite this offer, most of the men chose to kill anyway. Brow ...
    Related: ordinary, mass murder, life experience, economic depression, advance
  • Ordinary Men Or Willing Executioners - 1,328 words
    ... to Goldhagen, "Germans stood up for Poles" and when seventy-eight out of three hundred Poles were to be killed to set an example Trapp was remembered as being "very shaken after this action. He even wept. He was what one would call a fine human being and I deem it impossible that it was he who had ordered the shooting of the hostages." This event, according to Goldhagen, illustrates the juxtapositions the Germans and in this specific case the Reserve Battalion 101, had toward the Poles, for they indeed did kill them but spared more then they were ordered to. This clearly exemplifies to Goldhagen a very disturbing view that they could kill Jews by the thousands at a time but to kill seve ...
    Related: ordinary, final solution, american history, men and women, commander
  • Ordinary People By Judith Guest - 319 words
    Ordinary People By Judith Guest Ordinary People by Judith Guest is the story of a family having psychological problems, which relate to one another through superficial behaviors. They distort reality and hide their true emotions to reduce or prevent anxiety. The book opens with seventeen year old Conrad, son of upper middle-class Beth and Calvin Jarrett, comes home after eight months in a psychiatric hospital, because he had attempted suicide by slashing his wrists. His mother is a meticulously orderly person who despises him. She does all the right things; attending to Jared's physical needs, keeping a spotless home, plays golf and bridge with other women in her social circle but in her own ...
    Related: guest, judith, ordinary, ordinary people, attempted suicide
  • Ordinary People Ordinary People By Judith Guest Is The Story Of A Dysfunctional Family - 1,301 words
    Ordinary People Ordinary People by Judith Guest is the story of a dysfunctional family who relate to one another through a series of extensive defense mechanisms, i.e. an unconscious process whereby reality is distorted to reduce or prevent anxiety. The book opens with seventeen year old Conrad, son of upper middle-class Beth and Calvin Jarrett, home after eight months in a psychiatric hospital, there because he had attempted suicide by slashing his wrists. His mother is a meticulously orderly person who, Jared, through projection, feels despises him. She does all the right things; attending to Jared's physical needs, keeping a spotless home, plays golf and bridge with other women in her soc ...
    Related: dysfunctional, dysfunctional family, guest, judith, ordinary, ordinary people
  • The Final Steps Into The Ordinary - 855 words
    The Final Steps Into The Ordinary marcus Snell English 101 1:00-1:50 11/6/00 The Final Steps Into The Ordinary Its hard sometimes to put your finger on the tipping point of tolerance. Its not usually the Thurgood Marshalls and the Sally Rides, the big headlines and the major stories. Its in the small incremental ways the world stops seeing differences as threateningAnd its finally happening for gay men and lesbians. Theyre becoming ordinary. In the September issue of Newsweek magazine Ann Quindlen wrote an article entitled The Right To Be Ordinary. In this article Quindlen addresses the issue of gays and lesbians becoming a part of every day life. The article states that even though there is ...
    Related: ordinary, ordinary people, human race, different perspective, pledge
  • 13 Were The Elizabethans More Bloodthirsty Or Tolerant Of - 1,288 words
    13. Were the Elizabethans more bloodthirsty or tolerant of violence on stage than we are? In addition to the visible bloodletting, there is endless discussion of past gory deeds. Offstage violence is even brought into view in the form of a severed head. It's almost as though such over-exposure is designed to make it ordinary. At the same time, consider the basic topic of the play, the usurpation of the crown of England and its consequences. These are dramatic events. They can support the highly charged atmosphere of bloody actions on stage as well as off. By witnessing Clarence's murder, which has been carefully set up, we develop a greater revulsion for its instigator. And even though we ar ...
    Related: term paper, children play, queen elizabeth, historic, victorious
  • 16th Century Poetry - 1,273 words
    16Th Century Poetry Part I: 1. Name three of the Germanic tribes that brought to England the dialects that make up the basis of the language we now call Old English. The Germanic tribes that brought the dialects were the Angles, the Saxons, and the Jutes. 2. Give an example from Beowulf of three of the following poetic devices: alliteration, the kenning, variation (repetition of appositives), or the litote (understatement). There are several examples of alliteration in lines 3079-3084, "Nothing we advised could ever convince the prince we loved, our land's guardian, not to vex the custodian of the gold, let him lie where he was long accustomed, lurk there under earth until the end of the wor ...
    Related: century poetry, poetry, wife of bath, queen guinevere, repetition
  • 1984 - 957 words
    1984 1984 The story 1984, by George Orwell, is set in the fictional country Oceania, in what is thought to be the year 1984, which consists of the Americas, the British Isles, Australia and part of Africa. The part of Oceania in which 1984 takes place is referred to as Air Strip One and is formerly England. Winston, the protagonist of the story, is faced with a conflict of extreme hatred against the ultimate antagonist, Big Brother. Big Brother is the leader of the political party of Oceania who controls not only actions, but also thoughts through the thought police and what are called "telescreens." Winston falls in love with a girl by the name of Julia, and the two of them must decide on w ...
    Related: 1984, point of view, big brother, official language, brien
  • 1984 Analysis Of Predictions - 624 words
    1984 - Analysis of Predictions We are in a world of uncertainty and we can only guess and make predictions about what tomorrow will bring us. The book 1984 by George Orwell, was written in 1949 with his predictions about the future in 1984, thirty five years later. The part that interested me the most was where Orwell explains how we will no longer think on our own and that our thoughts and emotions would be controlled by the "thought police" for example. It was interesting to read about what a person thought in the past about todays society and read how some of the predictions came true. Freedom was taken away from everyone, they did what they were told and they had to obey, or harsh punish ...
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  • 1984 Vs Animal Farm - 1,278 words
    1984 Vs. Animal Farm 1984 vs. Animal Farm 1984, by George Orwell, is a very powerful drama which involves man and totalitarian society. It is a story of a lonely rebel whose only valuable is his mind and who later conspires with another in an attempt to separate from their increasingly dominant hate-infested society. In 1984, Orwell depicts the susceptibility of today's society and its possibility of becoming a realm of lies. In it, the masses live in constant fear, being monitored at all times. He also admonishes the fact that this society can be in store for us in the future. The main theme of 1984 is that without independent thought and freedom, corruption can and will transform decent or ...
    Related: 1984, animal farm, farm, main theme, leon trotsky
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey - 1,255 words
    2001: A Space Odyssey The concept of space travel has been an interest to many since the beginning of time. Today, scientists are moving at a comfortable pace to expand our vast knowledge of the universe. Many authors dreamed of the possibilities while scientists tried to bring them to reality. The book "2001: A Space Odyssey," written by Arthur C. Clarke in the 1960's, proposed ideas about advanced space travel that took place in a time period only two years from now; however, at the current rate of the space program, mankind is nowhere near the technology showed by the book. Clarke uses concepts of space travel that can still only be dreamed of today. Clarke, an author of the sixties, had ...
    Related: odyssey, outer space, space odyssey, space program, space shuttle, space technology, space travel
  • 24 Things - 1,719 words
    24 Things 24 Things 1. Your presence is a present to the world. 2. You're unique and one of a kind. 3. Your life can be what you want it to be. 4. Take the days just one at a time. 5. Count your blessings, not your troubles. 6. You'll make it through whatever comes along. 7. Within you are so many answers. 8. Understand, have courage, be strong. 9. Don't put limits on yourself. 10. So many dreams are waiting to be realized. 11. Decisions are too important to leave to chance. 12. Reach for your peak, your goal, and your prize. 13. Nothing wastes more energy than worrying. 14. The longer one carries a problem, the heavier it gets. 15. Don't take things too seriously. 16. Live a life of serenit ...
    Related: daily life, albert einstein, more important, rising, hidden
  • A Brief View Of Early Western Civilization In The 18th Century - 973 words
    A Brief View Of Early Western Civilization In The 18Th Century The area of early western civilization just following the feudal period was a very interesting time in Europe. There were many new innovations and problems in the way of life of the people of that time. Agriculture was still the main occupation of the time for most people. Two big problems that the people faced were those of war and poor harvest. It was said that perhaps the largest problem was the problem with poor grain. For the majority of people there was also the problem of land. For these people they either had no land of their own or insufficient amounts of it to support a family even when times were good. Poor harvests al ...
    Related: century england, civilization, western civilization, prentice hall, third edition
  • A Comparison Of Coleridge's Rationalism To Wordsworth's Liberalism - 1,720 words
    A Comparison Of Coleridge'S Rationalism To Wordsworth'S Liberalism All friendships grow and nurture each other through time. The friendship between Coleridge and Wordsworth allowed for a special relationship of both criticism and admiration to develop. As their friendship matured, they would play important roles in each other's works, culminating in their joint publication of Lyrical Ballads, which is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period and be a combination of their best works. Despite their basic differences in poetic styles and philosophical beliefs, they would help each other create numerous works renown for their depth and creativity. Coleridge was a reserved dreamer, a tru ...
    Related: comparison, liberalism, rationalism, young boy, samuel taylor coleridge
  • A Critique Of Philosophical Approaches To Criminal Justice Reform - 1,000 words
    A Critique Of Philosophical Approaches To Criminal Justice Reform People are arrested every day in the United States. They are put on probation or sent to jail, and sometimes they are let out on parole; there are millions of people affected. In 1995 alone there were over five million people under some form of correctional supervision, and the number is steadily increasing. The incarceration rate is skyrocketing: the number of prison inmates per 100,000 people has risen from 139 in 1980 to 411 in 1995. This is an immense financial burden on the country. Federal expenditure for correctional institutions alone increased 248% from 1982 to 1992. Obviously something has to be changed in the justic ...
    Related: approaches, criminal, criminal activity, criminal acts, criminal behavior, criminal justice, criminal mind
  • A Good Man Is Hard To Findand Write About - 1,311 words
    A Good Man Is Hard To Find(And Write About=) Ravi B. Lucas April 18, 2000 A Good Man Is Hard to Find The story of A Good Man Is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor has been debated and analyzed so much because it can be interpreted one thousand different ways. OConnors characters are usually searching for an elusive salvation, and her stories illustrate her views on the human condition. Many spiritual themes weave their way through her work, but never seem to achieve their intended ends. In this story, groups of criminals massacre an entire family while their ringleader discusses theology with the family's grandmother, only a hundred feet away. The source of the misinterpretation of the storys ...
    Related: good man is hard to find, john wesley, belief system, pitty sing, reveal
  • A Rose For Emily - 1,941 words
    A Rose For Emily The Factors that Form the Character Emily Grierson The characters in a work of literature are not only formed by their characteristics, but also by the story. There are many factors in a story which shape the characters. These may include the setting, mood, and theme. In William Faulkners A Rose for Emily, the conflict between past and present, chronological order and generations, her physical appearance and the grotesque mood affect the way the reader views Emily Grierson. In the small town of Jefferson, somewhere in the south, lived a woman named Miss Emily. After her father died, the Colonel pardoned her taxes. This caused conflict as she got older since there was no writ ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, emily grierson, rose for emily, an encounter
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