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  • Northern Virginia Juvenile Detention - 1,372 words
    Northern Virginia Juvenile Detention The Northern Virginia Juvenile Detention Home The Northern Virginia Juvenile Detention Home was established to provide safe, secure custody for juveniles being charged with a crime, or are awaiting court action. The majority of children are held pending court disposition or transfer to another jurisdiction or agency. A few children may be held temporarily for as long as three months. Currently the referrals come from the Juvenile Courts of Arlington, Alexandria, and Falls Church. In 1960, Northern Virginia built the home for the sole purpose of housing all of its juvenile delinquents. Over the course of thirty years, the home's size became the cause for c ...
    Related: detention, juvenile, juvenile delinquents, juvenile detention, northern virginia, virginia
  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,266 words
    ... and Britain gave up any serious hopes of a Confederate victory. With Britain's vote of confidence also went the possibility of European support for the Confederacy. Without this vital link with the outside world, the Confederacy lost all advantage in the war. Amidst all the turmoil of the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, ending slavery in all territories, including the South, which Lincoln continued to insist was under Union jurisdiction. Recognition of the Proclamation became a required element of Lincoln's "ten-percent plan", whereby 10% of the population of any seceded state could reform the state government and apply for readmission ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, radical republicans, robert e lee, alabama
  • Alzheimers - 562 words
    Alzheimers Recent Memory Loss That Affects Job Performance It's normal to occasionally forget assignments, colleagues' names or a business associate's telephone number, but generally remember them later. Those with a dementia like Alzheimer's disease, may forget things more often, and not remember them later. They may repeatedly ask the same question, not remembering either the answer, or that they already asked the question. Difficulty Performing Familiar Tasks Busy people can be distracted from time to time and leave the carrots on the stove, only remembering to serve them at the end of the meal. People with Alzheimer's disease could prepare a meal, forget to serve it, and even forget they ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, different ages, warning signs, bowl, virginia
  • Atomic - 2,303 words
    Atomic Bomb Then a tremendous flash of light cut across the sky . Mr. Tanimoto has a distinct recollection that it traveled from east to west, from the city toward the hills. It seemed like a sheet of sun. РJohn Hersey, from Hiroshima, pp.8 On August 6, 1945, the world changed forever. On that day the United States of America detonated an atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima. Never before had mankind seen anything like. Here was something that was slightly bigger than an ordinary bomb, yet could cause infinitely more destruction. It could rip through walls and tear down houses like the devils wrecking ball. In Hiroshima it killed 100,000 people, most non-military civilians. Three day ...
    Related: atomic, atomic bomb, albert einstein, cuban missile, eliminate
  • George Washington - 1,082 words
    George Washington Born February 22, 1732, in Westmoreland County, he was the first son of his father Augustine's second marriage; his mother was the former Mary Ball of Epping Forest. When George was about three, his family moved to Little Hunting Creek on the Potomac, then to Ferry Farm opposite Fredericksburg on the Rappahannock in King George County. In the interim, the powerful Fairfax family of neighboring Belvoir introduced him to the accomplishments and appropriateness of mannered wealth and, in 1748, provided him his first adventure. That year Lord Fairfax dispatched him with a party that spent a month surveying Fairfax lands in the still-wild Shenandoah. In the expedition, he began ...
    Related: george washington, king george, first continental congress, fort duquesne, legislative
  • George Washington - 1,094 words
    George Washington Steven Sims Social Studies 8-6 4/5/99 Born February 22, 1732, in Westmoreland County, he was the first son of his father Augustine's second marriage; his mother was the former Mary Ball of Epping Forest. When George was about three, his family moved to Little Hunting Creek on the Potomac, then to Ferry Farm opposite Fredericksburg on the Rappahannock in King George County. In the interim, the powerful Fairfax family of neighboring Belvoir introduced him to the accomplishments and appropriateness of mannered wealth and, in 1748, provided him his first adventure. That year Lord Fairfax dispatched him with a party that spent a month surveying Fairfax lands in the still-wild Sh ...
    Related: george washington, king george, farewell address, northern virginia, pittsburgh
  • Gettysburg - 1,209 words
    Gettysburg The Battle of Gettysburg, fought from July 1 through July 3, 1863, marked a turning point in the Civil War. This is the most famous and important Civil War Battle that occurred, around the small market town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Most importantly Gettysburg was the clash between the two major American Cultures of there time: the North and the South. The causes of the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg, one must understand the differences between these two cultures. The Confederacy (the South) had an agricultural economy producing tobacco, sugar, and cotton, were found to thrive in the South. With many large plantations owned by a few very wealthy rich white males. These ...
    Related: battle of gettysburg, gettysburg, gettysburg pennsylvania, american civil war, american civil
  • Gettysburg - 1,335 words
    Gettysburg This most famous and most important Civil War Battle occurred over three hot summer days, July 1 to July 3, 1863, around the small market town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. It began as a skirmish but by the time it ended, it involved 160,00 Americans. Before the battle, major cities in the North such as Philadelphia, Baltimore and even Washington itself, were under threat of attack from General Robert E. Lees Confederate Army of Northern Virginia which had crossed the Potomac River and marched into Pennsylvania. the Union Army of the Potomac under its new and untried commander, General George G. Meade, marched to intercept Lee. On Tuesday morning, June 30, an infantry brigade of Co ...
    Related: gettysburg, gettysburg pennsylvania, civil war, cemetery hill, thursday
  • Lincoln Vs Davis - 1,240 words
    ... can place his scorn and the contempt of the folks up north on the folks down south) -- Sigel brought in to command the 11th Corps when recruitment's were down-- (dismissed temporarily when campaigning began, brought back in 1864 only to be humiliated at New Market by the cadets...he could now remove him permanently). There were most definitely others, but Lincoln remained unscathed. Known to history as the Great Emancipator, Lincoln believed-and often said-that it was impossible for white and black men to live together in freedom. His only solution for America's greatest problem was for all the blacks to return to Africa. In his Emancipation Proclamation he carefully drew the boundaries ...
    Related: davis, lincoln, president lincoln, confederate congress, mississippi river
  • Robert E Lee - 720 words
    Robert E. Lee Robert E. Lee has always been thought by many as a god-like figure. To others he was a contradiction. Born on January 19, 1807 at Stratford, Virginia, Robert E. Lee was the fourth child of Revolutionary War hero, Henry Light Horse Harry Lee, and Ann Hill Carter Lee. Raised mostly by his mother, Robert learned patience, control, and discipline from her. As a young man, he was exposed to Christianity and accepted its faith. In contrast to the strong example of his mother and the church, Robert saw his father go from failed enterprise to failed enterprise. As a result, young Robert tried harder to succeed. Robert was accepted to the United States Military Academy and graduated 2nd ...
    Related: robert e lee, robert e. lee, president gerald ford, stonewall jackson, martha
  • Robert E Lee - 1,931 words
    Robert E Lee For some the man Robert E. Lee is an almost god like figure. For others he is a paradox. Robert E. Lee was born on January 19, 1807 at Stratford, Virginia. Robert was the fourth child of a Revolutionary War hero Henry Light Horse Harry Lee and Ann Hill Carter Lee. Young Robert, the son, was raised mostly by his mother. From her he learned patience, control, and discipline. As a young man he was exposed to Christianity and accepted its faith. In contrast to the strong example of his mother Robert saw his father go from failed enterprise to failed enterprise. In part the young Robert was led to try harder and succeed. Robert was accepted to the United States Military Academy and g ...
    Related: robert e lee, robert e. lee, states army, jeb stuart, aide
  • Robert E Lee - 1,071 words
    Robert E. Lee Robert E. Lee, who was considered to be the greatest soldier fighting for the Confederate States of America, descended from a long line of famous heroes. Many of Lee's ancestors played important roles in America's history. His father was a Revolutionary War hero and a friend of George Washington. He was often referred to as "Light Horse Harry" Lee. Lee was born on January 19, 1807 in Stratford, Virginia. Lee always admired Washington, and was his hero as a youngster. Young Lee decided to become a soldier, partly because of the military tradition of his family. Lee enrolled in West Point Military Academy and graduated 2nd in his class in 1829. Lee majored in military engineering ...
    Related: robert e lee, robert e. lee, northern virginia, union army, abolitionist
  • Robert Edward Lee - 1,105 words
    ... momentous personal decision. After the firing on of Fort Sumpter, the first shots of the Civil War, Lee was offered command of the Federal Army by Abraham Lincoln. Lee was offered command of an army that was charged with the duty of invading the South. A south that included Virginia, a Virginia that Lee truly loved. On the morning of April 19th, Lee returned from nearby Alexandria with news that Virginia to had seceded. The Lees had their supper together. Lee then went, alone, to his upstairs bedroom. Below, Mary listened as he paced the floor above, then heard a mild thump as he fell to his knees in prayer. Below, she also prayed (Kelly 41). Hours later he showed her two letters he had ...
    Related: edward, robert e lee, robert e. lee, park service, battle of antietam
  • Robert Lee - 1,283 words
    ... ng the very liberty, freedom and legal principles for which Washington had fought. He was willing to leave the union, as Washington had left the British Empire, to fight what the South called a second war of independence. Lee had great difficulty in deciding whether to stand by his native state or remain with the Union, even though Lincoln offered him the field command of the United States Army. He wrote to his sister,"...in my own person I had to meet the question whether I should take part against my native state. With all my devotion to the Union, and the feeling of loyalty and duty of an American citizen, I had not been able to make up my mind to raise my hand against my relatives, m ...
    Related: robert e lee, robert e. lee, united states army, states army, destroying
  • The Battle Of Antietam - 809 words
    The Battle of Antietam The Battle of Antietam The Battle of Antietam was fought on September 17, 1862. The United States Army of the Potomac led by General George B. McClellan fought against the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia led by General Robert E. Lee. The battle was fought along the Antietam Creek near Sharpsburg, Maryland. Both of the armies were densely concentrated in the Sharpsburg area, and it was a very bloody battle. The Union Army lost over twelve thousand men, while the Confederate Army lost around ten thousand men. General Robert E. Lee narrowly escaped defeat this battle and the lack of men cause him and his army to retreat back in to Virginia. Lee had good reason for w ...
    Related: antietam, battle of antietam, robert e. lee, stonewall jackson, confederacy
  • The Civil War - 1,932 words
    The Civil War The Civil War was the most convulsive and significant war in American history. After the Constitution was adopted by all of the States in 1789, uniting the States into one nation, differences between the States had been worked out through compromises. By 1861 these differences between the Northern States, which included the Western States, and the Southern States had become so great that compromise would no longer work. Therefore, a conflict started within our nation that was called the Civil War. Although causes of the Civil War have long time been debated by historians, there are many reasons that are agreed on. For more than thirty years arguments between the North and South ...
    Related: american civil, american civil war, causes of the civil war, civil war, harpers ferry
  • The Civil War - 1,983 words
    ... ts. After dark, Lee ordered the battered Army of Northern Virginia to withdraw across the Potomac into the Shenandoah Valley. Another battle is the Battle of Fredricksburg. On November 14, 1862 Burnside, now in command of the Army of the Potomac, sent a corps to occupy the vicinity of Falmouth near Fredericksburg. The rest of the army soon followed. Lee reacted by positioning his army on the heights behind the town. On December 11, Union engineers laid five pontoon bridges across the Rappahannock under fire. On the 12th, the Federal army crossed over, and on December 13, Burnside mounted a series of assaults on Prospect Hill and Marye's Heights that resulted in a lot of casualties. Meade ...
    Related: civil war, robert e. lee, army corps, general john, ship
  • The Color Bearer Tradition The War Between The States Was The Heyday Of American Battleflags And Their Bearers With Unusualhi - 1,993 words
    The Color Bearer Tradition The War Between the States was the heyday of American battleflags and their bearers. With unusualhistorical accuracy, many stirring battle paintings show the colors and their intrepid bearers in the forefront of the fray or as a rallying point in a retreat. The colors of a Civil War regiment embodied its honor, and the men chosen to bear them made up an elite. Tall, muscular men were preferred, because holding aloft a large, heavy banner, to keep it visible through battle smoke and at a distance, demanded physical strength. Courage was likewise required to carry a flag into combat, as the colors "drew lead like a magnet." South Carolina's Palmetto Sharpshooters, fo ...
    Related: american, american revolution, bearer, southern baptist, ulysses s. grant
  • The Color Bearer Tradition The War Between The States Was The Heyday Of American Battleflags And Their Bearers With Unusualhi - 1,964 words
    ... otomac to move southeast about 12 miles to the vicinity of Spotsylvania Court House (NPS Web Site), hoping to get between the Army of Northern Virginia and Richmond. General Robert E. Lee, however, was quicker, and elements of the Confederate First Corps arrived at Spotsylvania Court House just ahead of the Federals. Over the next few days a series of collisions in the area occurred as both sides took up positions and brought up additional units. The Army of Northern Virginia settled into a defensive line at Spotsylvania that bulged northward in the center to form a salient or "mule-shoe," with elements of Lieutenant General Richard Ewell's Second Corps defending the mule-shoe. At first ...
    Related: american, bearer, secretary of state, state house, chapel hill
  • The Final Months Of The Civil War - 1,136 words
    ... ns to move again, Lee had assessed the situation and informed President Davis that Richmond and Petersburg were doomed. Lees only chance wold be to move his troops out of Richmond down a southwestern path. They were to meet with General Johnstons forces. Johnston had been dispatched to Virginia after being ordered not to resist the advance of Shermans Army. Lee chose a meeting point to the west, in the small town of Amelia Court House. He made a narrow escape. The soldiers could see Richmond burning as they made their way across the James River and to the west. Grant had finally broken through. Richmond and Petersburg were finished on the second day of April. President Lincoln visited th ...
    Related: civil war, northern virginia, john arthur, american nation, sheridan
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