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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: northern ireland

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  • 100 Years Of History - 1,762 words
    100 Years of History CURRENT EVENTS: 1945-1996 1945 On April 12 Harry S. Truman became President of the United States of America., In Washington, D.C. On August 6 at 9:15 a.m. US fighter planes dropped an Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima Japan. In Berlin, Germany on April 30, Adolf Hitler was found dead, Hitler committed suicide. 1946 On October 16 in Nurenburg, 9 Nazi war criminals were hanged for the crimes during WW II. On April 25 Big Four Ministers met in Paris to finalize a treaty with Germany, to end WWII. In Austria Queens New York, on October 22, Chester Carlos tried his experiment that is commonly known as the Xerox machine. 1947 On November 20, in England, Queen Elizabeth gets married to ...
    Related: history, south korea, force base, jackie robinson, meter
  • Alcoholism - 2,059 words
    Alcoholism alcoholism Definitions and causal factors of alcoholism Alcoholism consists of a repetitive intake of alcoholic beverages to an extent that the drinker is harmed. The harm may be physical or mental; it may also be social or economic. Implicit in the conception of alcoholism as a disease is the idea that the person experiencing repeated or long-lasting injury from his drinking would alter his behaviour if he could. His failure to do so shows that he cannot help himself, that he has lost control over drinking. This conception incorporates the idea of addiction or dependence. Formal definitions of alcoholism vary according to the point of view of the definer. A simplistic, old-fashio ...
    Related: alcoholism, affective disorder, social factors, world war ii, relation
  • Corporal Punishment - 658 words
    Corporal Punishment Dear Sir, I am writing in reply to the recent publication of an item on the topic of corporal punishment. I do not agree that it is needed to bring discipline back into our schools. It is assumed that a child who has been caned would be less likely to commit another offence , but this was never proved and , in fact , one theory holds that severe corporal punishment increases the likelihood of future offences. There are better ways to discipline students than hitting them. Some parents may believe that spanking a child may be beneficial but apart from being potentially dangerous physically, it can lower their self esteem, hinder their academic abilities and may even contri ...
    Related: corporal, corporal punishment, punishment, early years, social issues
  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,616 words
    England (Latin Anglia), political division of the island of Great Britain, constituting, with Wales, the principal division of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. England occupies all of the island east of Wales and south of Scotland, another division of the United Kingdom. Established as an independent monarchy many centuries ago, England in time achieved political control over the rest of the island, all the British Isles, and vast sections of the world, becoming the nucleus of one of the greatest empires in history. The capital, largest city, and chief port of England is London, with a population (1991 preliminary) of 6,378,600. It is also the capital of Great Britai ...
    Related: church of england, division, great britain, latin, principal, southern england
  • Frankenstein - 859 words
    Frankenstein The novel Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley is an excellent example of the Romantic Movement. The movement took place in the period from the late 1700's to the mid-1800; it emphasized passion rather than reason and imagination and intuition rather than logic. One of the key concepts most Romantic writers used was, nature is a source of inspiration. They believed that people who lived in an industrialized area were unhappy because the environment around them was not full of the beautiful gifts of nature. While people who lived in the countryside all their lives were full of happiness as a result of their surroundings. This concept is beautifully brought out in Frankenstein. Having th ...
    Related: frankenstein, natural philosophy, romantic movement, mary shelley, dread
  • I Suppose - 1,689 words
    I Suppose suppose I believe that I learned to read like I learned to breathe. That it was something that could not be recalled because it was either so embedded in my experience that I had no memory of it, or it was an involuntary reflex of my brain. My mother tells me that she read to me; that I began to learn to read in Miss Grogans Kindergarten class. But I retain no distinct memories of the Bumper Book that my mother has kept all these years on the shelf in the closet of my old bedroom. But somewhere along the way, I developed a love of reading. I became a true bibliophile in third grade when we were assigned Charlottes Web by E.B. White. I still remember Wilburs proclamation of Stupendo ...
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  • Informative Speech On Tourism - 1,158 words
    Informative Speech on Tourism INTRO Imagine yourself flying in a plane to US for a summer job. You are travelling to experience new country, job, to meet new friends from all over the world. And you think that you are really happy to be in that position. Everything seems to be perfect in your life, except some insignificant details. But all of a sudden an armed psycho puts a gun barrel to your head and proclaims that he wants to change the plane course, and if this will not be done he will kill you. You never know how serious his intentions can be. You begin to fell panic realizing that you can die very soon. What will happen next? Will the pilot change the course? Will the mad guy kill you ...
    Related: informative, informative speech, tourism, nineteenth century, first century
  • Ira : Is Force Justified - 1,546 words
    IRA : Is Force Justified? The Irish Republican Army is not justified in using force to achieve its aims because the Irish Republican Army (IRA) represents the minority of the population in Northern Ireland. The IRA also is not justified in using force because using force does not work and it turns their supporters against them. The IRAs goals are political and political rights should be achieved through political methods, not by force. In cases where the majority of the population is not fairly represented in the government and peaceful protests and demonstrations have not been successful, then resorting to armed resistance is justified. For example, in the case of the American Revolution, t ...
    Related: justified, irish american, great britain, equal rights, quote
  • Ira Peace Settlement - 1,954 words
    IRA Peace Settlement The Irish Republican Army, also known as the IRA, is a parliamentary and nationalist organization that opposes the connection of Northern Ireland to Great Britain. The IRA is also dedicated to the creation of a single unified Irish state. The name IRA derived from the veterans of the Easter Battles of 1916. The battle was fought for support of Irish independence. Accordingly the IRA became the political division of the Sinn Fein party. The political leaders of Britain and Ireland, negotiated a treaty that incorporated 26 of Ireland's counties as the Irish Free State. The remainder of Ireland, remained part of the United Kingdom. The Irish Republican Army began to decline ...
    Related: peace process, settlement, prime minister, british prime minister, confidential
  • Ireland - 1,371 words
    ... the Irish were to blame for their own poverty, starvation, and death; the English, who were really to blame, could go on living without guilt or regret. IV. The starvation influenced the history of the United States During the years of starvation, many Irish fled their homeland and came to the United States. In 1851, two hundred fifty thousand Irishmen boarded ships headed for America. One main draw for immigration into the United States was that many Irish had relatives already living in the U.S. Fares were inexpensive, it that was known as the land of opportunity, and it was free from British law, making it Evan more attractive. After the Civil War came the industrialization of the Un ...
    Related: ireland, northern ireland, school system, governmental policies, objectively
  • Ireland - 821 words
    Ireland The flag is colored green, white and orange, which the green stripe stands for those of the native Irish descents, the orange stripe represents the descendants of 17th Century British Colonists and the white stripe is for the hope and peace between the two groups. The brown form is drawn in the shape of the country Ireland and the brown represents the hills and mountains. I chose to drawn the puffin bird, because it is the national bird of Ireland. It is a black bird with a white breast and a multi-colored beak, it is found nesting along the rocky ledges of Ireland. The scenic picture shows the peacefulness of the land with a symbolic house and the beautiful blue rivers that Ireland ...
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  • Ireland Irishes - 873 words
    Ireland Irishes Like most Americans, my family is made up of many different ethnic groups. My moms side is Irish Protestant descent. My dads side is mostly English descent and a little of Native American descent from his mother. There is some in which I do not know because my dad does not know who his dad is. He was adopted by a man named David Mitchell, this is where my last name comes from. My grandmother died and never told my dad who his dad was. My dad could find out from his birth certificate, which is sealed in Albany, who his dad is. He has no desire to do that though. Over the summer, I tried to find out about my familys ancestry. I only searched on my moms side since it is easier. ...
    Related: ireland, northern ireland, ethnic groups, old world, presbyterian
  • Irland - 876 words
    Irland Like most Americans, my family is made up of many different ethnic groups. My mom's side is Irish Protestant descent. My dad's side is mostly English descent and a little of Native American descent from his mother. There is some in which I do not know because my dad does not know who his dad is. He was adopted by a man named David Mitchell, this is where my last name comes from. My grandmother died and never told my dad who his dad was. My dad could find out from his birth certificate, which is sealed in Albany, who his dad is. He has no desire to do that though. Over the summer, I tried to find out about my family's ancestry. I only searched on my mom's side since it is easier. This ...
    Related: civil war, first wave, seventeenth century, native, alcoholism
  • Jocelyn Susan Bell Burnell - 468 words
    Jocelyn (Susan) Bell Burnell Jocelyn (Susan)Bell Burnell An important woman in the contribution of science is Jocelyn Bell Burnell. She is a British astronomer that discovered pulsars, which is a tiny, very dense, rapidly rotating neutron star that appear to emit radiation in pulses. Jocelyn was born in 1943 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. She was raised near the Armagh Observatory, which obviously impacted her life She graduated from Glasgow University in 1965 with a B.S. degree in Physics, and in 1968 she received a Ph.D. in radio astronomy from the University of Cambridge in 1968. Jocelyn began her studies by conducting experiments of gamma-ray astronomy at the University of Southampton. Fr ...
    Related: bell, jocelyn, susan, electromagnetic spectrum, milky way galaxy
  • Machiavelli - 3,021 words
    ... eferring to the notorious but often also highly misunderstood cynical character of Machiavelli's analysis, I want to concentrate in the means, not in the legitimacy of the polities, or in the question of whether their goal is genesis, restoration, defence, or destruction of a polity's existence and liberty. The means, namely, ultimately reveal many relevant features of a polity's character: whether its power is built upon legitimacy and liberty, or upon coercion and terror. Those admirers of Machiavelli, who read his works in a selective way, or out of their historical context, tend to overemphasise the cynical character in the thinking of Machiavelli, who wanted to appear a worthy advis ...
    Related: machiavelli, roman empire, christian nation, middle east, contrary
  • Politics Of Western Europe November 17, 1994 Politics Of Western Europe Blood And Belonging This Is A Critique Of The Book, B - 1,795 words
    Politics of Western Europe November 17, 1994 Politics of Western Europe BLOOD AND BELONGING This is a critique of the book, Blood and Belonging, by Michael Ignatieff. This paper will explain the subject of the book and its relevance, discuss Michael Ignatieff's methods and conclusions on the subject and finally include a personal critique of the book by the author of this paper. The author of the book travels on what he terms "the six journeys." On these "journeys" he encounters different cultures, as he travels to six different coinciding areas of the world. He examines the unique expression of nationalism that each populace displays by interviewing various members of that particular societ ...
    Related: belonging, blood, critique, religion and politics, western europe
  • Reading In The Dark - 1,590 words
    ... ts, he wants to not deal with it, though, just like his parents, he doesn't understand yet the consequences of holding it in. Katie, on the other hand, also does not understand the history of the family, but she deals with it in her own way by telling this story. She forces the narrator to begin dealing with this history when she goes on with telling the story. Through this story of haunting, the affects of two different authority figures becomes clear by how the narrator reacts to having to begin dealing with their past and how difficult it can be. The authority of the narrator's father is used by Deane to show the colonialization of the Irish people by the British government and the re ...
    Related: british government, military force, the girl, reveal, injustice
  • Reading In The Dark By Deane - 1,614 words
    Reading In The Dark By Deane In his novel, Reading In the Dark, Seamus Deane tells the story of an Irish Catholic family in Northern Ireland between the late Forties and early Seventies. He traces the path taken by a growing boy searching for and finding the truth about his family during this very tumultuous time and having to come to terms with what he discovers. Deane uses this family to illustrate the issues surrounding history that are central to the deeper understanding of his novel. He shows how the British government's and the Catholic church's differing agendas affect these people's history and the consequences of not dealing with their history and past resulting in their subjugation ...
    Related: northern ireland, british government, secret history, refuse, ireland
  • Reading In The Dark By Deane - 1,589 words
    ... , he wants to not deal with it, though, just like his parents, he doesn't understand yet the consequences of holding it in. Katie, on the other hand, also does not understand the history of the family, but she deals with it in her own way by telling this story. She forces the narrator to begin dealing with this history when she goes "on" with telling the story. Through this story of haunting, the affects of two different authority figures becomes clear by how the narrator reacts to having to begin dealing with their past and how difficult it can be. The authority of the narrator's father is used by Deane to show the colonialization of the Irish people by the British government and the re ...
    Related: worth living, the girl, time passes, mystery, ignorance
  • Scotland - 1,669 words
    Scotland The Land Scotland is part of the United Kingdom on the British Isles. It makes up one-third, or 32% of the island. It is bordered on the north and west by the Atlantic Ocean, while the North Sea is to the east of the country. England makes up the southeastern border. The Irish Sea is directly south of Scotland. The total area of the country is a little more than 30,400 square miles. Scotland has a positive-relative location, and is a developed country. There are over 800 islands that are part of the nation, although there are only 186 islands that are inhabited. The majority of Scotland's islands lay on its west coast. They are divided into two groups: the Inner Hebrides, and the Ou ...
    Related: scotland, dental hygiene, roman catholic, british isles, islands
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