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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: athenian democracy

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  • Athens Vs Sparta - 1,547 words
    Athens Vs. Sparta During the times of Ancient Greece, two major forms of government existed, democracy and oligarchy. The city-states of Athens and Sparta are the best representatives of democracy and oligarchy, respectively. The focus of the times was directed towards military capabilities, while the Athenians were more interested in comfort and culture. It was the oligarchy in Sparta that put a war-like attitude as its first priority and best met the needs of Ancient Greece. These factors empowered Sparta and led to the development of an authoritative and potent state. Other contrasting issues included women's rights, social classes, and value of human life. Four rulers, Draco, Solon, Pisi ...
    Related: athens, sparta, right to vote, family foundation, travel
  • Democracy In Athens - 1,208 words
    Democracy In Athens A Democracy is defined as a government of, by and for the people. Originally, democracy meant rule by the common people. In this sense, and even before the beginning of modern class society, it was very much a class affair. It meant that power should be in the hands of the largest class: the poorest, least educated and the propertyless. As a result, democracy was feared and rejected by the educated, the cultured, and the wealthy. In classical Greece, democracy was seen by the enlightened and the educated as one of the worst types of government and society imaginable. The rule of the people was regarded as a threat to all the cherished values of a civilized and orderly soc ...
    Related: ancient athens, athenian democracy, athens, democracy, political power
  • Democracy In Athens - 1,159 words
    ... il met everyday, except for festival days and certain other forbidden days, in the Bouleuterion in the Agora. When the Assembly met, the Council would meet in the afternoon since most Assembly meetings lasted only till noon. The primary responsibilities of this body were the preparation of an agenda for the assembly and the supervision of the magistrates. Just as the Assembly required a smaller body (the Council) to prepare business for it, the Council needed a group much smaller than 500 to supervise its activities. This supervision was performed by each contingent of 50 Council members from one tribe, serving in turn (decided by lot) as prytaneis or "presiding officers" for 1/10 of the ...
    Related: ancient athens, athenian democracy, athens, democracy, direct democracy, modern democracy
  • Development Of Democracy In Athens - 1,120 words
    Development Of Democracy In Athens Development of Democracy in Athens Democracy comes from two Greek words: a noun demos which means, "people" and a verb, kratein, which means "to rule" (Ober 120). Democracy first appeared in Athens towards the beginning of the fifth century B.C. The biggest difference between Athenian democracy and almost all other democracies is that the Athenian version was a direct democracy rather than being representative. Democracy came about in Athens as a result of the growing navel power and the reforms made by leaders such as Cleisthenes and Pericles. The city-state of Athens, 5th century Athens to be precise, is the inventor and first practitioner of democracy. S ...
    Related: athenian democracy, athens, democracy, direct democracy, political corruption
  • Development Of Democracy In Athens - 1,127 words
    ... ns lived fifteen or twenty miles out in the countryside (Demand 224). This would have presented quite a burden for those in the countryside. So, it is possible that those who lived in the city were over represented. The Council, though, was automatically geographically diversified. Cleisthenes's reform, which ensured that people from the countryside, at least had some say at that stage of deliberations. Cleisthenes may also have been responsible for the Athenian practice known as ostracism. Under this procedure the Athenians would vote once a year in a sort of negative election. The unlucky winner, assuming a minimum of 6000 votes had been cast, was sent into exile for ten years. The ost ...
    Related: athenian democracy, athens, democracy, executive branch, peloponnesian war
  • Governmental Techniques In The Ancient World - 1,978 words
    Governmental Techniques in the Ancient World Throughout history, many techniques have been used for organizing society. Experimentation with different styles primarily took place in the ancient Mediterranean world. Athenian democracy, Hebrew temple state, Hellenic city-states, Hellenistic kingdoms, the Roman Republic, and the Christian Roman Empire were all major forms of governance, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. To determine which of these forms was successful, it is impotent to look at each forms chronological development. Hebrew State Origin The Hebrew State began as a loose confederation of twelve tribes. A tribes elders ruled it, and while there was intermarriage between ...
    Related: ancient world, governmental, world power, athenian democracy, city states
  • Greek Grave Steles - 1,742 words
    Greek Grave Steles To us who live in modern times the melancholic look that we find in the sculpture of cemeteries throughout the world is something we take for granted. Although its authenticity has been lost to us, this so-called look can be traced back to 5th century Greek funerary sculpture. For us it is only natural to associate such a look with death. However, as the above verse elaborates, the Greeks viewed death somewhat differently from the way we do. To them death freed their souls and brought true happiness: then why does their grave sculpture look so pensive and thoughtful? It is because unlike today where the dead are only represented figuratively in a sobbing angel or mournful ...
    Related: grave, greek, greek art, greek sculpture, archaic period
  • How Far Do We In Britain Live In A Democracy - 1,114 words
    ... ey act will effect whether they get voted into power again. And it is possible for an individual to have their voice heard as specific interests can go into parliament through lobbying through an MP. A parties policies are very clearly laid out before an election, you know what values you are voting for when you hand over your power. And most importantly, because of a representative democracy, representatives have a close attachment with their constituency. They will be there frequently, holding surgeries and be expected to answer mail from their constituents. Linking back to the liberal democracy, in Britain, the way that it works is through the parliamentary system, so it is known as p ...
    Related: athenian democracy, britain, democracy, direct democracy, liberal democracy
  • Peloponnesian War Strategies - 1,769 words
    Peloponnesian War Strategies Just before the Peloponnesian War began, Pericles of Athens and King Archidamus of Sparta provided net assessments of the comparative strengths and weaknesses of the two sides. Evaluate their projections. A study of the strategies and projections of King Archidamus of Sparta as compared to those of Pericles of Athens reveal Archidamus' understanding of the superiority of land power as a basis for success at sea in the ancient Mediterranean - as well as Pericles' naivet as to this tenet. Background The Peloponnesian War between the city-states of Athens and Sparta (and their respective allies) lasted from 431-404 BC. Conflicts between the two cites dated back furt ...
    Related: peloponnesian, peloponnesian league, peloponnesian war, city state, different cultures
  • Plato Life Plato Was Born To An Aristocratic Family In Athens, Greece When He Was A Child His Father, Ariston, Who Was Believ - 1,802 words
    Plato LIFE Plato was born to an aristocratic family in Athens, Greece. When he was a child his father, Ariston, who was believed to be descended from the early kings of Athens died, and his mother, Perictione married Pyrilampes. As a young man Plato was always interested in political leadership and eventually became a disciple of Socrates. He followed his philosophy and his dialectical style, which is believed to be the search for truth through questions, answers, and additional questions. After witnessing the death of Socrates at the hands of the Athenian democracy in 399 B.C., Plato left Athens and continued to travel to Italy, Sicily, and Egypt. (Internet) In 387 B.C. Plato founded the Ac ...
    Related: athens greece, greece, human life, knowledge plato, plato
  • Socrates - 1,786 words
    Socrates Socrates: A Great Philosopher Kimberly Whitaker Honors Survey of World History: HONR 1151 Dr. Veula J. Rhodes, Instructor Albany State University November 22, 1999 Foreword Thesis: Exploring Socrates and his philosophies give the seeker a new understanding of the life and society in which Socrates lived. With this new understanding, one can compare or contrast other views of the period. In doing this, the researcher is provided with a map of ideas and philosophies throughout history. This map can be used to enhance our present understanding of past cultures. I. Introduction II. The early life of Socrates III. Problem of Socrates IV. Philosophical ideas and techniques A. Universal de ...
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  • Socrates On Democracy - 523 words
    Socrates On Democracy In Platos Euthyphro, Crito and the Apology, we learn of Socrates highly critical view of the democracy. Socrates believed that democracy was a flawed system because it left the state in the hands of the unenlightened and it valued all opinions as equal. In the Apology, we see how Socrates believed it was his duty to stand for the law and justice despite the wishes of The Assembly, and this cold have cost him his life. In Crito, Socrates states to obey the laws of the State, only if they are just. It could be said that Socrates views on democracy and justice is what ultimately led to his death. Socrates believed poor leaders are chosen, simply on their basis of their rhe ...
    Related: athenian democracy, crito socrates, democracy, socrates, law and justice
  • Was The 5th Century Bce A Golden Age For Athens - 1,322 words
    Was the 5th Century BCE a Golden Age for Athens? subject = History 209 (Ancient Greek History) title = Was the 5th Century BCE a "Golden Age" for Athens? The 5th century BCE was a period of great development in Ancient Greece, and specifically in Athens. The development of so many cultural achievements within Athens and the Athenian Empire has led scholars to deem this period a "Golden Age." It is true that his period had many achievements, but in the light of the Athenians treatment of women, metics (non-Athenians living in Athens), and slaves it is given to question whether or not the period can truly be called "Golden." The 5th century and the Athenian Empire gave birth to an amazing amou ...
    Related: athens, golden, golden age, athenian women, persian wars
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