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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: military strategy

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  • After The Atomic Bomb - 1,201 words
    After The Atomic Bomb Introduction The development and usage of the first atomic bombs has caused a change in military, political, and public functionality of the world today. The bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki revolutionized warfare by killing large masses of civilian population with a single strike. The bombs' effects from the blast, extreme heat, and radiation left an estimated 140,000 people dead. The bombs created a temporary resolution that lead to another conflict. The Cold War was a political standoff between the Soviet Union and the United States that again created a new worldwide nuclear threat. The destructive potential of nuclear weapons had created a global sweep of fear as ...
    Related: after effects, atomic, atomic bomb, bomb, hydrogen bomb
  • Animal Farm - 1,306 words
    Animal Farm Many great works have been inspired by events in history. George Orwells Animal Farm provides an unusual outlook on the Russian Revolution and its leaders by using animals to represent their human counterparts. Orwell attacks communist society and points out weaknesses in its government officials. He calls for a close examination of the treatment of Russian citizens and questions whether they have any rights at all. Orwell was careful in his designation of animals in Animal Farm, especially in regards to the power reserved for the pigs. Animal Farm uses the perfect combination of animal symbolism to relate the occurrences on Manor Farm to actual historical events of the Russian R ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, manor farm, san diego, government officials
  • As The Twentieth Century Comes To A Close, The World Can Now Look Back On A Century Filled With War, Technology, Revolution, - 1,601 words
    As the twentieth century comes to a close, the world can now look back on a century filled with war, technology, revolution, and growth. When looking back upon the most powerful leaders that shaped past century, it cant be assumed that all of them had good intentions in mind. In fact, it is these leaders, the ones who set forth goals of destruction and massacre, that have affected the past hundred years the most drastically. The two men who fully represented this figure of dictatorship and extreme fascism are without a question Adolf Hitler of Germany and Benito Mussolini of Italy. These men strove for unrealistic and inhumane ideals, and both convinced a nation to follow them. Hitler and Mu ...
    Related: first world, twentieth, twentieth century, world domination, world war i
  • Barbarossa - 1,215 words
    Barbarossa When Germany invaded Russia in 1941, they did so neither near-sighted or as a back-handed diplomatic ploy. While Russia remained a key objective to Hitler, it was also seen as a necessity for long-term victory and survival in Europe for Germany. Plan Yellow, as developed by Field Marshal Erich von Manstein, called upon the pre-emptive strike against an imperialistic Russia, using speed and superior leadership as keys to victory. To always remember the axiom: History is written by the conquerers, is key to the history of the German-Russian War 1941-1945. This paper intends to not only convey the necessity and the upside of a German attack and subsequent victorys but also the Russia ...
    Related: barbarossa, witch hunts, armed forces, german economy, british
  • Begun As A War Between South Korea Republic Of Korea And North Korea Democratic Peoples Republic Of Korea, After The Norths I - 1,625 words
    Begun as a war between South Korea (Republic of Korea) and North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of Korea), after the North's invasion of the South, the conflict swiftly developed into a limited international war involving the U.S. and 19 other nations. From a general viewpoint, the Korean War was one of the by-products of the cold war, the global political and diplomatic struggle between the Communist and non-Communist systems following World War II. The motives behind North Korea's decision to attack South Korea, however, had as much to do with internal Korean politics north and south of the 38th parallel (the boundary between the two republics) as with the cold war. Contrary to the pr ...
    Related: begun, democratic people, korea, north korea, north korean, people's republic of china, peoples republic
  • Cubas Politics - 1,690 words
    Cuba`s Politics While the isle of Cuba was initially discovered on October 27, 1492 during one of Columbus first voyages, it wasnt actually claimed by Spain until the sixteenth century. However, its tumultuous beginnings as a Spanish sugar colony provides an insightful backdrop into the very essence of the countrys political and economic unrest. From its early revolutionary days to the insurrectional challenge of the Marxist-Leninist theories emerged the totalitarian regime under Fidel Castro in present day Cuba. Cuban colonial society was distinguished by the characteristics of colonial societies in general, namely a stratified, inegalitarian class system; a poorly differentiated agricultur ...
    Related: post cold, fidel castro, international community, mood, accelerated
  • Julius Caesar By William Shakespeare 1564 1616 - 1,584 words
    Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616) Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616) Type of Work: Tragic drama Setting Rome,- 44 B.C Principal Characters Julius Caesar, popular Roman general and statesman Brutus, a prominent and devout Roman, and close friend to Caesar Cassius, a conspiring enemy of Caesar Marcus Antonius, Caesar's supporter, a brilliant politician Story Overveiw Rome was in an uproar. General Julius Caesar had just returned after having defeated his rival, Pompey His many military triumphs had made him the most powerful man in Rome. The commoners - blindly cheering whoever was in power - flocked into the streets to hail him. As Caesar passed through the ci ...
    Related: caesar, julius, julius caesar, shakespeare, william shakespeare
  • Medieval Technology And Social Change - 1,184 words
    Medieval Technology And Social Change Medieval Technology and Social Change Oxford University Press first published Medieval Technology and Social Change in 1962. It discusses the technological advances during the medieval times and how these changes affected society. The book's author, Lynn White, Jr., was born in San Francisco in 1907. Educated at Stanford, Union Theological, and Princeton, White taught at Princeton and the University of California at Los Angeles. He was also president of Mills College in Oakland from the 1940s to the 1960s. His other works include Medieval Religion and Technology: Collected Essays, published in 1978 and Life & Work in Medieval Europe, the Evolution of Med ...
    Related: medieval, medieval europe, medieval life, medieval times, science and technology, social change, social effects
  • Napoleon - 610 words
    Napoleon Although he inspired new social, economic, and political ideas, Napoleon Bonaparte is better known for his military tactics. Even today, his battle plans are used and studied by many in the military. Napoleon, who started out as an extremely short and wimpy foreigner who rose to become Emperor of France, died in 1821 at St. Helena, a remote island in the South Atlantic. He was fifty-two years old. Th cause is uncertain: either he was poisoned or he died of a stomach ailment. Bonaparte was born in 1769 on the island of Corsica just as France conquered it. At age ten, Napoleon was sent to military school outside Paris. At sixteen, he graduated and became a lieutenant in the artillery. ...
    Related: napoleon, napoleon bonaparte, social status, military tactics, saving
  • Oliver Cromwell - 835 words
    Oliver Cromwell Oliver Cromwell, a Puritan fundamentalist and undefeated commander of the Ironsides, forever changed the history of England with, perhaps, what he did not do, rather than what he did do after the success of the insurrection he led against Charles. Though rather unsuccessful as a politician, Cromwell, single-handedly redefining the art of war and military strategy, proved to be one of the greatest military geniuses of all time. Despite the professionally trained forces that often outnumbered him three to one in battle, he struck fear in his opposition and maintained an untarnished record in battle that proved the degree of his skill. Historians traditionally fail to classify h ...
    Related: cromwell, oliver, oliver cromwell, english revolution, military strategy
  • Pancho Villa - 1,440 words
    Pancho Villa Doroteo Aranga learned to hate aristocratic Dons, who worked he and many other Mexicans like slaves, Doroteo Aranga also known as Pancho villa hated aristocratic because he made them work like animals all day long with little to eat. Even more so, he hated ignorance within the Mexican people that allowed such injustices. At the young age of fifteen, Aranga came home to find his mother trying to prevent the rape of his sister. Aranga shot the man and fled to the Sierra Madre for the next fifteen years, marking him as a fugitive for the first time. It was then that he changed his name from Doroteo Aranga to Francisco "Pancho" Villa, a man he greatly admired. Upon the outbreak of t ...
    Related: pancho villa, villa, general john, york times, fourteen
  • Philip Ii Of Spain - 1,301 words
    Philip Ii Of Spain HOW WAS SUCCESSFUL A RULER WAS PHILIP II? To fully answer this question it is necessary to truly evaluate each of his policies with dealing his enemies and compatriots both foreign and domestic throughout his reign. This essay will attempt to take each main area of conflict in his life and provide clear indications as to the degree of success that Philip achieved. Philip's character itself is a critical as his personality and characteristics convey, not only himself, but also his empire to others. It is believed by some historians that Philip was a far poorer leader than his father, Charles I, who had reigned before him. Philip grew up to be an outsider and carried this fl ...
    Related: spain, military strategy, adverse effects, iberian peninsula, properly
  • Ptolemy - 2,363 words
    ... to the United States in 1871. In the United States he began teaching students that were either deaf, mute or both. He taught by the system called visible speech. This system, was developed by his father, a Scottish educator named Alexander Melville Bell. It shows how the lips, tongue, and throat are used to make sound. In 1872 Bell founded a school for deaf-mutes in Boston, Massachusetts. The school later became part of Boston University, where Bell was appointed professor of vocal physiology. He became a naturalized US citizen in 1882. Ever since the age of 18, Bell had been working on the idea of transmitting speech. In 1874, while working on a multiple telegraph, he developed the basi ...
    Related: ptolemy, human life, poor health, state government, transmitted
  • Rooselvelt - 5,189 words
    ... gation and flood-control projects are part of PWAs legacy. The most spectacular agency designed to promote general economic improvement was the National Recovery Administration (NRA), an organization set up (along with the PWA) by the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA), which was passed by Congress in June 1933. The NRA was designed to help business help itself. Unfair competition was supposed to be eliminated through the establishment of codes of fair competition; in effect, laws against combinations of large businesses were to be suspended in exchange for guarantees to workers. These guarantees specifically included minimum wages, maximum hours, and the right to bargain as a group ...
    Related: reserve board, secretary of state, prime minister, committee, winston
  • Should Marijuana Be Legalized - 3,055 words
    Should Marijuana Be Legalized? In this year of the millenium, the American populace, even while in the midst of the most prolonged economic boom in the history of the Republic, is confronted with some serious problems. Any randomly chosen group of people asked to list the most dangerous of these, would include among their immediate answers: "The Drug Problem". By the "Drug Problem", do they mean the proliferation in our communities of all illicit, mood-altering, physically dangerous drugs? Or do they really mean the accompanying problems bought on by these proscribed substances: crime and the threat of crime, violence, disease, the growing number of users on public welfare, the loss of produ ...
    Related: marijuana, marijuana prohibition, drug offenders, high school, aclu
  • Sir Winston Churchill - 361 words
    Sir Winston Churchill Sir Winston Churchill Sir Winston Churchill was the eldest son of aristocrat Lord Randolph Churchill and was born on 30th November 1874. He is best known for his stubborn and courageous leadership as Prime Minister for Great Britain when he led the British people from the brink of defeat during World War II, ultimately to victory over NAZI Germany. Early Life to the PM of Britain Following his graduation from the Royal Military College in Sandhurst he was commisioned in the Forth Hussars in February 1895. As a war correspondent he was captured during the Boer War. After his escape he became a National Hero. Ten months later he was elected as a member of the Conservative ...
    Related: churchill, lord randolph churchill, winston, winston churchill, military strategy
  • Spartan Warfare Sparta In The 7th Century Bc A New Era Of Warfare Strategy Evolved Before This New Strategy, Foot Soldiers Kn - 1,228 words
    Spartan Warfare Sparta In the 7th Century BC a new era of warfare strategy evolved. Before this new strategy, foot soldiers (known as hoplites) engaged in battle in the form of one mob for each army which on the command of their generals runs at each other and proceeds to hack blindly at the enemy with little to no direction other then to kill the enemy in front of them. This proved to be very messy and the tide of battle depended mostly on emotion and size of an army. In the name of strategy and organization, the phalanx was developed. A phalanx is simply defined as a line formation with its width significantly larger then its depth. The depth of the phalanx is a variable which some suggest ...
    Related: foot, military strategy, modern warfare, sparta, strategy, warfare
  • The Anti War Movement Of The Vietnam War - 912 words
    The Anti War Movement Of The Vietnam War The Anti-War Movement J,J,J,J, United States participation in the Vietnam War was a subject of much debate among the American public. While many Americans supported the United States involvement in the War, in agreement with the Government that American assistance was needed in order to stop the spread of Communism, other people felt that it was immoral for the United States to involve itself in another country's internal matters. The antiwar movement against Vietnam in the US from 1965-1971 was the most significant movement of its kind in the nation's history. Anti-war protesters were not confined to the young, radicals, intellectuals, and the disaff ...
    Related: vietnam, vietnam war, civil rights, college students, criticism
  • The Antiwar Movement Against Vietnam In The Us From 19651971 - 1,388 words
    ... images of dirty-mouthed hippies taunting the brave, clean-cut American soldiers who confronted the unruly demonstrators (VN H. and P.). Americans were soon shocked to learn about the communists' massive Tet Offensive on January 31, 1968. The offensive demonstrated that Johnson had been making the progress in Vietnam seem much greater than it really was; the war was apparently endless. Critics of the administration policy on the campuses and Capitol Hill had been right after all. For the first time, the state of public opinion was the crucial factor in decision making on the war. Johnson withdrew his candidacy for reelection in March of 1968, and he was offering the communists generous t ...
    Related: antiwar, northern vietnam, southern vietnam, vietnam, johns hopkins
  • The Foundation Of Power And Justice In International Law - 1,093 words
    The Foundation Of Power And Justice In International Law Thucydides wrote The History of the Peloponnesian War believing that it was a good picture of the past and which (human nature being what it is) will, at some time or other and in much the same way, be repeated in the future." This paper will present a comparison between the time of Thucydides and how the International system has reflected certain aspects that are contained in the document. It will attempt to address the possibilities of oncoming systemic war, concepts of trust, and the earlier statement of Thucydides. Terms that are important to this argument are anarchy, security dilemma, and balance of powers. Anarchy is the system ...
    Related: international law, international politics, international relations, international system, military power
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