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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: midwife

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  • A Cultural Study Of Childbirth In Rural Mexico - 1,567 words
    A Cultural Study of Childbirth in Rural Mexico Outline I. make up of a typical home A. living arrangements B. layout of the home II. starting a family A. new home B. becoming pregnant III. child birth A. midwife B. birth setting C. prenatal care D. birth of the child E. postpartum IV. conclusions The rural Mexican culture is made up of many small towns and villages. The social connections among adults in theses areas are relatively intimate because many of these areas are endoga mous communities. Most newly married couples live with the man's parents until they are financially stable enough to purchase land of their own to build on. Though it is less common the couple may decide to live with ...
    Related: childbirth, mexico, rural, mexican culture, early childhood
  • Angus Mclaren - 763 words
    Angus Mclaren Angus McLaren, author of "Illegal Operations: Women, Doctors, and Abortion" demonstrates the life of an abortionist in the late 1800's to the mid 1900's. McLaren explains a series of affairs in detail with many different abortionists. Since abortion was illegal at the time, many women consulted midwives, or took the procedure of abortion among themselves, this at times resulted in their death. The articles purpose is to use legal sources to explore the decision to abort while the state, and the professions took a serious interest in the fertility control decisions of women. What is being argued is the fate of women burdened with unwanted pregnancies whose well-being was placed ...
    Related: detailed description, dying patient, went wrong, properly, performing
  • Aztec - 1,870 words
    Aztec The Aztec lived in the city of Tenochtitlan, which is a fertile basin about 50 miles long and as wide. Surrounded by mountain ranges and several volcanoes, the Aztec has abundant supply of water. With being 8000ft above sea level the day were mild and the nights are cold during much of the year. The Aztecs name means heron people their name is derived from the mythical homeland to the north called Azatlan. This in mind their language(Nahuatl) also belong to the linguistic family as the Soshonean, a tongue will represented among the Indians of the Untied States. In the Aztecs culture their main principal crop was maize. Maize was usually cooked with lime then ground to make dough, then ...
    Related: aztec, before marriage, american history, young women, agriculture
  • Aztec Nation - 2,986 words
    Aztec Nation The Aztec Nation A distant sound is heard. It sounds like a deep drum being hit with a heavy instrument. You hear it again and strain your eyes in the direction of the sound. All around you is dense jungle. Snakes slither between your legs. You hear the sound once again. In front of you is a dense stand of ferns. You part them and look down into a wide open valley. The valley gets so wide and it is so green that it takes your breath away. But that is not what you are looking at. You are staring at a huge city with glittering buildings shining in the spring sunlight. Smoke rises up from some of the many houses. You can see and hear children playing in the wide open fields in fron ...
    Related: aztec, aztec empire, aztec gods, aztec religion, long history
  • Aztecs - 1,499 words
    Aztecs The Aztecs Around 1168 AD, a Nahua tribe called the Aztecs left their mysterious homeland known as Aztln and migrated south to Central Valley. At first the Aztecs were practically enslaved by the other Nahua tribe, but they continued to struggle for power. By the 1300's the Aztecs had founded two different settlements on Islands in lakes. These places are known as Tlaltetalco and Tenochtitln. By the 15th century Tenochtitln was the center of the Aztec world. By the 16th century Tenochtitln dominated all the other cities in Central Valley. The middle of the Aztec Empire was near the Lerma River. This plateau is made up of five different sections; the volcanic axis lies across the south ...
    Related: aztec empire, aztec gods, aztecs, mighty aztecs, world book
  • Female Circumcision - 1,162 words
    Female Circumcision Lou Barbero Barbero 1 Professor Garber Hm 46 March 5th The Argument against Female Circumcision Female circumcision is an operation done in many of the Arab countries and is an example of how woman change their bodies in order to conform to society. There are many aspects to this practice such as medical, religious and psychological. Very few people in these countries will ever say anything on the matter, even if they object. Speaking of issues regarding women and sex in these countries is a taboo. One woman, Nawal El Saadawi, a medical doctor who later became Egypt's Director of Public Health was brave enough to come forward. The fact that she did ultimately lead to dism ...
    Related: circumcision, female circumcision, religious leaders, works cited, hill
  • Female Genital Mutilation - 1,231 words
    Female Genital Mutilation Female genital mutilation (FGM) is referred to as the removal of part, or all, of the female genitalia. The most severe form is infibulation, otherwise known as pharaonic circumcision. It is estimated that 15% of all FGMs performed in Africa are infibulations. The procedure consists of clitoridectomy (all, or part of, the clitoris is removed), excision (removing all, or part of, the labia minora), and cutting of the labia majora to make raw surfaces, which are stitched together to form a cover over the vagina as they heal. A small hole is left to allow urine and menstrual blood to get out. The majority (85%) of genital mutilations performed in Africa involve a clito ...
    Related: female genital mutilation, genital, genital mutilation, mutilation, gender identity
  • Female Genital Mutilation - 1,588 words
    Female Genital Mutilation Female Genital Mutilation The practice of female genital mutilation, also known as female circumcision, occurs throughout the world, but it is most common in Africa. Female genital mutilation is a tradition and social custom to keep a young girl pure and a married woman faithful. In Africa it is practiced in the majority of the continent including Kenya, Nigeria, Mali, Upper Volta, Ivory Coast, Egypt, Mozambique and Sudan. It is a cross-cultural and cross-religious ritual, which is performed by Muslims, Coptic Christians, Protestants, Catholics and members of various indigenous groups. Female genital mutilation is usually performed on girls before they reach puberty ...
    Related: female circumcision, female genital mutilation, genital, genital mutilation, mutilation
  • Female Gential Mutalition - 1,150 words
    Female Gential Mutalition Female Genitalia Mutilation Picture this, a young innocent girl, between the age of eight and twelve, running around, playing, and having a good time. Then she is snatched away to a foul hut, whose floor is nothing but dirt. Once in the hut, the helpless girl is stripped of all her clothing and pinned to the dirt floor. Her tiny legs are spread and held wide apart with a tight grasp. Soon afterward, a midwife, with no education in human anatomy or medicine, enters the hut and says a prayer. While the young girl is held down in this most vulnerable position the midwife takes a handful of sand and rubs it all over the girls genitals (Walker 106). With no anesthetics a ...
    Related: female circumcision, female genital mutilation, young girl, good time, edge
  • Female Gential Mutalition - 1,080 words
    ... ions, many girls will develop pelvic inflammatory disease. Some of the infections are due to urine and menstrual retention. Directly following the excision, the girl will almost always have urine retention. This is due to the swelling of the tissues, which causes severe pain during urination. When the girl holds her urine in like this, it can cause urinary tract infections. In addition to retaining urine, she might also retain menstrual blood. The opening that is left behind is at times too small for the blood to escape; thus there is a retention of menstrual blood (Rushwan). After experiencing this operation, many girls find that menstruating alone is intensely torturous. Indeed, some m ...
    Related: female genital mutilation, the girl, african countries, major problem, disorganization
  • History Of Frogs - 1,425 words
    History Of Frogs A Frog is a small, tail less animal that has bulging eyes. Almost all frogs have long back legs. The strong hind legs make the frog able to leap farther than the length of its body. Frogs live on every continent except Antarctica, but tropical regions have the greatest number of species. Frogs are classified as amphibians. Most amphibians, including most frogs, spend part of their life as a water animal and part as a land animal. Frogs are related to toads, but are different from them in a few ways. The giant frog of west-central Africa ranks as the largest frog. It measures nearly a foot (30 centimeters) long. The smallest species grow only 1/2 inch (1.3 centimeters) long. ...
    Related: frogs, history, mexican border, south america, frog
  • Johnny Tremain - 425 words
    Johnny Tremain Johnny Tremain takes place in pre-Revolutionary Boston. Johnny Tremain is boy who is proudtoo proud. His pride made him overconfident. He pretty much planned all of his life while he was young; he would be a silversmith and marry Cilla. His mother dies when he is fourteen years old. Before his mother died, he was apprenticed to a silversmith named Mr. Lapham. When his mother died, she gave him a silver cup that showed that he was a member of the Lyte family. The cup signifies that he is related to the famous merchant Lyte who was very rich. One Sunday, in order to get a silver basin for Mr. John Hancock done on time, Johnny broke the "Sabbath" and cast a silver pitcher. Dove, ...
    Related: johnny, john hancock, paul revere, proud, crucible
  • Johnny Tremain - 427 words
    Johnny Tremain Johnny Tremain takes place in pre-Revolutionary Boston. Johnny Tremain is boy who is proud - too proud. His pride made him overconfident. He pretty much planned all of his life while he was young; he would be a silversmith and marry Cilla. His mother dies when he is fourteen years old. Before his mother died, he was apprenticed to a silversmith named Mr. Lapham. When his mother died, she gave him a silver cup that showed that he was a member of the Lyte family. The cup signifies that he is related to the famous merchant Lyte who was very rich. One Sunday, in order to get a silver basin for Mr. John Hancock done on time, Johnny broke the Sabbath and cast a silver pitcher. Dove, ...
    Related: johnny, paul revere, john hancock, deliver, master
  • Martha Ballard - 1,803 words
    Martha Ballard We as a society are fortunate. We have the luxury of advanced technology to include: computers, telephones, video teleconferencing equipment, cellular phones, beepers, and hospitals with the latest gadgets and gizmos. Our technology is available only because of documented historical accounts. Our idea of work is having to get in our vehicles and driving to our destination and sometimes sitting behind a desk all day to push paper; the worst any of us suffers is a traffic jam here or there or worse, a construction site. Imagine life in the late eighteenth century. People in this era had to deal with not only getting up at dawn to milk the cows, but toiling for hours on end with ...
    Related: ballard, martha, associate professor, national endowment, practical
  • Midwifery Profession: Pros And Cons - 829 words
    Midwifery Profession: Pros And Cons Support for the Midwifery Profession: Pros and Cons The tradition of midwifery virtually disappeared in Canada during the early part of this century. Several generations of women gave up childbirth at home to the medical profession. They did this in the name of safety and pain relief, or simply because the option of being cared for by a midwife no longer existed. Midwifery should be re-instated as a legal and honourable profession. With healthy pregnancies and under normal conditions, women should give birth at home with the professional assistance of a midwife. The most common argument against home births and midwifery are perpetuated by the medical estab ...
    Related: cons, midwifery, pros, personal experience, medical profession
  • Moll Flanders By Daniel Defoe - 1,396 words
    Moll Flanders By Daniel Defoe Moll Flanders is a story about the fall and rise of a beautiful woman who was born in Newgate Prison. Her mother was saved from the gallows because "she pleaded her belly", and soon after Moll was born, her mother was shipped to the clonies to work out her sentence. Left behind, Moll was raised for three years with a band of traveling gypsies. Moll worked her way out of that, disgusted that England didn't have orphanages, and she was allowed to live with a "nurse." At a young age she decided she didn't want to be a servant, but a gentlewoman. Her defination of a gentlewoman was a woman who worked and supported herself, not, in fact, a wealthy woman. Moll's nurse ...
    Related: daniel, daniel defoe, defoe, flanders, moll, moll flanders
  • Oppression - 1,184 words
    Oppression Evil, sinful, lover of Satan and weak are just a few adjectives to describe women through history. Nevertheless, women were not always portrayed as so. Women once held a strong and dominated figure within the society. In the ancient Egyptian society, women were equal to men in status and prestige. Within the XVIIIth Dynasty, women such as Nephertiti and Hatchipsoot reign the country. "In that period, Pharaonic women laboured in textile and carpet manufactory, traded in markets and shared in hunting side by side with her husband (El Saadawi. 1980, P. 108-1)." Furthermore, women played sports, drank, held positions of government, worked, etc. However, as time past and countries bega ...
    Related: oppression, christianity and islam, sexual desire, married life, exploitation
  • Some Aspects Of Vietnamese Culture In Child Rearing Practices - 229 words
    Some Aspects of Vietnamese Culture in Child Rearing Practices I decided to focus my last cross-cultural research project on child rearing practices of the Vietnamese people and how they differ from that of my own. Included in my work are noteable differences I have found through my reading, research, discussions, interviews, & surveys. I have conducted my interviews not only through live person-to-person speech, but I have also utilized the internet and entered chatrooms to speak to Vietnamese people as well. I hope that my research is of interest, and can be informative and educational as it surely has been for me. During my interview with a co-worker I was told about a proverb and that mos ...
    Related: child rearing, rearing, vietnamese, south vietnam, research project
  • The Beginning - 755 words
    The Beginning Prenatal development is the period in development from conception to the onset of labor. Perinatal period is the period beginning about the seventh month of pregnancy and continuing until about four weeks after birth. Postnatal development is the period in development the follows directly after birth. The germinal stage is the stage lasting about ten -fourteen days following conception before the fertilized egg becomes implanted in the uterine wall. The embryonic stage is the stage in which major biological organs and systems form. The fetal stage is the stage in which is marked by rapid growth and preparation of body systems for functioning in the postnatal environment. Viabil ...
    Related: birth weight, alcohol syndrome, pregnant woman, sampling, pervasive
  • The Crucible - 1,427 words
    The Crucible The Crucible, a play by Arthur Miller that was first produced in 1953, is based on the true story of the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. Miller wrote the play to parallel the situations in the mid-twentieth century. Some characters in the play have specific agendas carried out by their accusations, and the fact that the play is based on historical truth makes it even more intriguing. The characters in this play are simple, common people. The accused are charged and convicted of a crime that is impossible to prove. The following witchcraft hysteria takes place in one of America's wholesome towns, which makes the miscarriage of justice such a mystery even today. The reasons the villai ...
    Related: crucible, the crucible, young woman, tragic hero, slave
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