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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: asian countries

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  • Argentinas Economy - 1,071 words
    ... Mercosurs GDP; Brazil share exceeds 70 percent. Each country in the Mercosur has preferential agreements with each other. The average trade-weighted external tariff is 17 percent. 85 percent of goods are included in Mercosurs common external tariff, with the balance to be phased into he common external tariff by 2006. Mercosur members countries expect to implement a common auto policy by 2000, which is to replace the current quota and tariff system. Argentinas trade with its other neighbor countries is not as significant as the trade it has with Brazil. Nevertheless, Trade between Argentina and Bolivia (56.4 percent), Peru (20 percent), Uruguay (12.8 percent), and Chile (8.3 percent) has ...
    Related: economy, foreign direct, duty free, intelligence unit, urge
  • Asia - 1,713 words
    Asia Asia Asia, largest of the earth's seven continents. With outlying islands, it covers an estimated 44,936,000 sq km (17,350,000 sq mi), or about one-third of the world's total land area. Asia has more than 3.2 billion inhabitants. Its peoples account for three-fifths of the world's population. Lying almost entirely in the northern hemisphere, Asia is bounded by the Arctic, Pacific, and Indian oceans. The conventional boundary between Europe and Asia is drawn at the Ural Mountains in Russia. Asia and Africa are separated by the Red Sea. Asia is divided for convenience into five major realms: the areas of the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR); East Asia, including China, Mo ...
    Related: asia, central asia, east asia, eastern asia, south asia, southeast asia, southwest asia
  • Asia - 1,308 words
    ... ried up. This financial crisis will probably lead to loss of confidence by investors in Thailand's economy and a slow down and then a slump would ensue, she predicted. Key Indicators to Watch Unemployment. Unemployment is already a problem, concentrated for the moment in urban areas, and affecting both skilled and unskilled workers in Asia. It is expected that in Thailand an estimated 900,000 workers will have lost their jobs by the end of 1999; in Indonesia, it is estimated that unemployment may have increased by some 2 million people, with predictions of substantial further rises in the coming months. In other countries with rigid rules governing hiring and firing, such as Korea, unemp ...
    Related: asia, east asia, economic downturn, government interference, fulfilling
  • Asian Crisis - 1,925 words
    Asian Crisis Introduction A financial crisis swept like a bush fire through the tiger economies of South East Asia between June 1997 and January 1998. One country after another, local stocks markets and currency imploded. When the dust started to settle, the stock markets in many of these countries had lost over 70% of their value. Leaders of some these nations had to approach the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to beg for massive financial assistance. The crisis in Asia has occurred after several decades of outstanding economic performance and growth. Annual Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth in the ASEAN- 5 (Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia and Philippines) averaged closed to 8% ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian crisis, crisis, east asian, economic crisis, financial crisis
  • Asian Crisis - 1,978 words
    Asian Crisis On the 2nd of July 1997, Asia was hit by one of the most devastating financial crises it has ever seen. Of all the financial crisis that have taken place, this was one of the most distressing in that it was totally unexpected. The purpose of this paper is to show that particular developmental strategies employed by these economies eventually led to their downfall. It will attempt to find out where the origins of the crisis lie, and what events started the cycle that eventuated with this disaster. In order to trace the events that led to the eventual collapse of the Asian economies, one must venture across the ocean to the United States. The issue of liberalisation first gained a ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian crisis, crisis, east asian, financial crisis, southeast asian
  • Asian Crisis - 1,034 words
    Asian Crisis There are many speculations about the causes of the Asian Crisis. From my research I found out that there is quite a number of reasons for the Asian currency crisis. There is a book called; The East Asian Miracle, which was published by the World Bank. This book expressed the relationship between government, the private sector, and the market. (See Hoover Digest 1998 No.3. William McGurn. What went wrong?) The book talks about the economic bloom in Southeast Asia. The East Asian countries borrowed a lot of money from the IMF and World Bank and used it to create a better economy for themselves. I found out that the following countries due to their reoccurrence during my research ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian crisis, asian values, crisis, east asian
  • Asian Crisis - 1,338 words
    Asian Crisis A large economic downturn in East Asia threatens to end its nearly 30 year run of high growth rates. It is hard to understand what these declines will actualy do to the world market. The crisis has caused Asian currencies to fall 50-60%, stock markets to decline 40%, banks to close, and property values to drop. The crisis was brought on by currency devaluations, bad banking practices, high foreign debt, loose government regulation, and corruption. Due to East Asia's large impact on the world economy, the panic in Thailand, Indonesia, Korea, and other Asian countries has prompted other countries to worry about the affect on their own economies and offer aid to the financially tro ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian crisis, asian nations, crisis, east asian, economic crisis
  • Asian Crisis - 1,309 words
    ... debt dried up. "This financial crisis will probably lead to loss of confidence by investors in Thailand's economy and a slow down and then a slump would ensue", she predicted. Key Indicators to Watch Unemployment. Unemployment is already a problem, concentrated for the moment in urban areas, and affecting both skilled and unskilled workers in Asia. It is expected that in Thailand an estimated 900,000 workers will have lost their jobs by the end of 1999; in Indonesia, it is estimated that unemployment may have increased by some 2 million people, with predictions of substantial further rises in the coming months. In other countries with rigid rules governing hiring and firing, such as Kore ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian crisis, asian economy, asian financial, asian financial crisis, asian nations
  • Asian Exclusion Laws - 504 words
    Asian Exclusion Laws Asian Exclusion Laws There were a very large number of local, state, and federal laws that were specifically aimed at disrupting the flow of Chinese and Japanese immigrants to the United States. Two of the major laws were the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act and the 1907-1908 Gentlemans Agreement. Although the laws had some differences, they were quite similar and had similar impacts on the immigrant population. The 1882, Congress enacted the Chinese Exclusion Act, which outlawed Chinese immigration. It also explicitly denied naturalization rights to Chinese, meaning they were not allowed to become citizens, as they were not free whites. Prior to the Chinese Exclusion Act, som ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian immigrants, chinese exclusion, chinese exclusion act, exclusion, federal laws
  • Asian Fall - 773 words
    Asian Fall East Asian Economy A large economic downturn in East Asia threatens to end its nearly 30-year run of high growth rates. The crisis has caused Asian currencies to fall 50-60%, stock markets to decline 40%, banks to close, and property values to drop. The crisis was brought on by currency devaluations, bad banking practices high foreign debt, loose government regulation, and corruption. Due to East Asias large impact on the world economy, the panic in Thailand, Indonesia, Korea, and other Asian countries has prompted other Countries to worry about the affect on their own economies and offer aid to the financially troubled nations (The Great Wave). The East Asian crisis has affected ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian crisis, asian economy, asian financial, asian financial crisis, asian nations
  • Asian Financial Crisis - 1,304 words
    Asian Financial Crisis Introduction Many economists have said that the growth experienced by Southeastern Asian countries during the 1980s and early 1990s was a miracle. Japan, Malaysia, South Korea, Indonesia and other countries in the region experienced annual growth rates of over 7 percent. Along with this rapid growth, these countries also saw very little unemployment and an almost invisible wealth gap between the different social and economic classes of citizens. Circumstances have dramatically changed, however. In the summer of 1997, Southeast Asia experienced a time of great financial and economic turmoil. At first, the economic crisis was isolated in Thailand's financial sector, but ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian financial, asian financial crisis, crisis, economic crisis, financial crisis
  • Asian Financial Crisis - 1,333 words
    ... Often times, banks were pressured to make loans at the request of the government. The government felt if this cycle of borrowing and reinvesting in domestic industries continued, so would the economic growth. By 1997, many Asian businesses had debts valued at between three and six times the total amount of cash invested in their companies. These massive debts quickly led to bankruptcy when currencies fell and no one was willing to extend any more loans in Asian countries. Corruption was also rampant in this region, causing further problems in Southeast Asia. In June 1997, 11 prominent businessmen, bankers and politicians were convicted of embezzling funds and pressuring banks to make ill ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian crisis, asian financial, asian financial crisis, crisis, financial crisis
  • Asian Financial Crisis - 1,036 words
    Asian Financial Crisis Have you ever been in a situation where you were low cash and in debt? Well, I know I have. I remember one time when I had used up all of my money for the month, and owed, at the same time, my sister ten dollars. Boy, that was pure hell. You cant buy anything, and you feel like you have no control over anything. Well, imagine an entire continent in a financial rut. That is what is currently going on in Asia. This dilemma is known as the Asian Financial Crisis. Now, what exactly is the Asian Financial Crisis? Well, it is the current imbalance of Asias economy. While some areas are doing great, most areas are poor and economically unstable . Currency value has gone down ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian financial, asian financial crisis, crisis, financial crisis
  • Asian Financial Crisis - 1,037 words
    ... ill start buying the bonds and stocks. This will get the stockmarket of Japan back on track again. (Another country to look at is Hong Kong. Hong has stayed- while everyone else has devalued - in a situation where it cannot support its currency rate against the US dollar. So, the peope of Hong Kong end up not being able to pay for all their daily needs for the price of things have zoomed. As the Chinese economy is shrinking so extravagantly that it's destroying itself, all possibilities for trade and investment in and out of China, (which are primary for Hong Kong) are dismissed. The economic problems that Hong Kong are currently dealing with are obviously associated to the Asian financi ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian financial, asian financial crisis, crisis, financial crisis, financial problem
  • Australia And Asia Relationship - 1,209 words
    Australia and Asia relationship Australia and Asia relationship This essay analyses the Australian-China bilateral relationship since 1945 and in particular its political significance to Australia. Many global factors have influenced this relationship, including the advent of the Cold War, the Korean War, the Vietnam War and the collapse of the Soviet bloc European nations. In addition, internal political changes in Australia and China have both affected and been affected by the global changes. It will be analysed that Australia's bilateral relationship with China has always had a sharp political edge but that approaching the new millenium economics and trade considerations are shaping Austr ...
    Related: asia, asia pacific, australia, east asia, political system
  • Australian Immigration Law - 1,059 words
    Australian - Immigration Law Australia is similar to America in many ways. They are both industrialized nations, they were both settled by the British, and they both have multi-ethnic societies. However, the two countries have vastly different immigration laws. In America, we will let almost anyone move here and work. An American immigrant can be from (almost) any country, race, or religion. Australia on the other hand, has had a much stricter policy determining who can move to their country. Australia's immigration law is ethnocentric in nature because it excludes anyone who is not of Anglo-Saxon descent. The policy is in the best interest for the British settlers, rather than in the best i ...
    Related: australian, australian government, immigration, immigration laws, immigration policy
  • Birth Of Communication - 2,382 words
    Birth Of Communication Outline I. It is important to reflect one's own national and cultural identity to understand what is different among people of different nations. History teaches us that culture always changes because of internal or external influences, even our own cultures and values change over time. Our world today is a world in which people from different nations and cultures are getting closer and closer because of economical and political reasons. Because cultures are becoming closer, communication is the most important quality for anyone to work on if they want to work in the international society. The history of communication and the relationships that were formed in the early ...
    Related: communication technology, cross-cultural communication, cultural communication, intercultural communication, international communication
  • Buddhism - 1,718 words
    Buddhism Buddhism is one of the major religions of the world it was founded by Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, who lived in northern India from c.560 to c.480 BC. The time of the Buddha was a time of social and religious change, the development of trade and cities, the breakdown of old tribal traditions, and the rise of many new religious movements that answered the demands of the times. These movements came from the Brahmanic tradition of Hinduism but were also reactions against it. Of the new sects, Buddhism was the most successful and eventually spread throughout India and most of Asia. Today Buddhism is divided into two main branches. The Theravada, or "Way of the Elders," the more conse ...
    Related: buddhism, mahayana buddhism, tantric buddhism, tibetan buddhism, changing world
  • Buddhismat A High School Level - 930 words
    Buddhism-At A High School Level Buddhism Buddhism, founded in the late 6th century BC by Siddhartha Gautama (the Buddha), is an important religion in most of the countries of Asia. Buddhism has come in many different forms, but in each form there has been an attempt to draw from the life experiences of the Buddha, his teachings, and the spirit or essence of his teachings (called dharma) as models for the religious life. However, before the writing of the Buaciha Charija (life of the Buddha) by Ashvaghosa in the 1st or 2nd century AD, the members did not have a complete record of his life. The Buddha was born in North India (appx. 570 BC) at a place called Lumbini, near the Himalayan Foothill ...
    Related: high school, school level, southeast asian, sri lanka, noble
  • Child Labour And Society - 1,659 words
    Child Labour And Society A concern of child labour exists from poverty. We have to understand as why children go to work. If parents don't send their children to work I am sure factories will not be able to consume them. Why poor parents feel children as their assets who will earn money for their home? Are they forced by their parents to go to work? If yes why? Nearly 30% of population in poor countries are poorest of poor who are not even able to earn enough for one day food with big family have to largely depend on children to earn and feed. Parents of these children are mainly illiterate or semi literate are unable to find jobs, which can provide enough salary. Dream of education to child ...
    Related: child labour, labour, young child, urban areas, social security
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