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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: microorganism

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  • Aids - 1,140 words
    ... rom a few days to several weeks and is associated with fever, sweats, exhaustion, loss of appetite, nausea, headaches, soar throat, diarrhea, swollen glands, and a rash on the torso. Some of the symptoms of the acute illness may result from HIV-1 invasion of the central nervous system. In some cases the clinical findings have correlated with the presence of HIV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid. Symptoms disappear along with the rash and other sings of acute viral disease. When the blood test for HIV-1 antibodies become available, researchers demonstrated the lymphadenopathy was a frequent consequence of infection with the virus. Scientist do not know what causes the wasting syndrome, but som ...
    Related: aids, immune system, human immunodeficiency, recent studies, regulation
  • Antibiotics - 1,650 words
    Antibiotics Antibiotics have played a major role in our society thanks to Sir Alexander Fleming's careful observations in 1928. Without it, many lives would be in danger due to infectious diseases. Antibiotics are chemical substances produced by various species of microorganisms and other living systems that are capable in small concentrations of inhibiting the growth of or killing bacteria and other microorganisms. These organisms can be bacteria, viruses, fungi, or animals called protozoa. A particular group of these agents is made up of drugs called antibiotics, from the Greek word anti ("against") and bios ("life"). Some antibiotics are produced from living organisms such as bacteria, fu ...
    Related: medical profession, half lives, printing office, concentration, permanent
  • Career Review: Pharmacist - 1,307 words
    ... dynamics 1 (CHEM254), Organic Chemistry2/Laboratory (CHEM 265/265L), Physics2/Laboratory (PHYS112/112L), (Third year) Advanced Cell Biology (BIOL 331), Physical Biochemistry (CHEM 357), Synthetic Organic Chemistry/Laboratory (CHEM 360/360L), Molecular Biology (BIOL330), Metabolism 1(CHEM333), Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory (CHEM334L), Elementary Statistics for biology (STAT202), And four elective courses, (Fourth year) Elective courses chosen from Group A, B, and C (Seven credits from Group A, B, and C, with at least 5.5 credits from Group A and B, of which are not less than 4.0 credits are from Group A). Group A: (BIOL 342) Molecular Biotechnology 1, (BIOL 428) The Molecular Genetics ...
    Related: pharmacist, social issues, drug therapy, unemployment rate, structural
  • Chemical Warfare - 1,064 words
    ... which can lead to pneumonia, is very fast spreading, and can lead to respiratory distress, contracts it. It can be lethal. Death can occur in less than 48 hours from the time of infection. Inhalation anthrax however is very rare and there is a vaccination available. According to Health Answers, Symptoms include:  Fever  General Discomfort, uneasiness, or ill feeling (malaise)  Headaches  Shortness of breath  Cough  Congestion of the nose and throat  Pneumonia  Joint Stiffness  Joint pain Signs and tests:  Blood culture is positive for anthrax  Chest x-ray  Serologic test for anthrax  ...
    Related: chemical warfare, warfare, distress syndrome, drug administration, infected
  • Cholera - 595 words
    Cholera Cholera is an infectious intestinal disease common in Southern Asia. Cholera is caused by a comma-shaped bacterium called Vibrio Choleras. The microorganism is transmitted by water or food that has been contaminated with the feces of people who have the disease. Cholera occurs when Vibrio Cholera enters the intestines and releases Cholera toxin. The toxin causes the intestine to secrete large amounts of water and salt. Because the intestine cannot absorb the water and salt at the rate they are secreted, the patient suffers severe diarrhea. This loss of fluid causes severe dehydration and changes in the body chemistry. If untreated, the illness can lead to shock and eventually death. ...
    Related: cholera, food products, west africa, western hemisphere, practically
  • Genetically Engineered Foods - 1,002 words
    ... r irritants and could act at the biochemical, cellular, tissue or organ levels to disrupt a range of physiological functions. An example of a class of genetically engineered foods that are of particular concern are those that have been modified to produce biological control agents such as the family of insecticidal Bt enterotoxins. The Bt toxin, which has been used topically in organic farming, has powerful biological activity. If consumed in larger amounts it can become a toxin. Plants genetically-manipulated to produce Bt toxin produce at least 1000 times more Bt toxin per acre than does a heavy application of Bt directly on plants. There was another case where one company genetically ...
    Related: engineered food, genetically, genetically engineered food, genetically modified, genetic engineering
  • How The Government May Have Created Aids - 4,554 words
    How the Government May Have Created AIDS The following is a complete verbatim transcription from a recent broadcast of "Network 23", a program shown on a local Los Angeles Public Access Cable Channel. FULL TRANSCRIPTION FROM NETWORK 23: Good evening, I'm Michel Kassett. This is Network 23. A couple of weeks ago we had a program on the subject of AIDS, addressing the question of whether AIDS -- the AIDS virus -- was created by the government; and I'm sure that some people were quite shocked by what they heard. We spent that entire program relating to you the evidence of a very substantial amount of factual evidence which supports the proposition that AIDS is a synthetic biological agent that ...
    Related: aids, aids research, american government, states government, united states government
  • Human Disease Research - 2,361 words
    ... ical retardation. Abnormal development of any body part in a fetus may produce a congenital defect; for example, if walls that separate the chambers of the heart fail to form completely, the baby is born with congenital heart disease. BImmunological Diseases Immunological diseases occur when the immune system, which normally protects against infections, malfunctions. The most common types of immunological diseases are allergies, autoimmune diseases, and immune deficiencies. An allergy is an abnormal reaction of the immune system to foreign substances, such as plant pollen, fungal spores, animal danders, medications, and foods. Rhus dermatitis is an allergy caused by contact with urushiol ...
    Related: cardiovascular disease, disease research, heart disease, human body, human disease, human history, human population
  • In 1981, A New Fatal, Infectious Disease Was Diagnosedaids Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome It Began In Major Cities, Such - 744 words
    In 1981, a new fatal, infectious disease was diagnosed--AIDS (Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome). It began in major cities, such as New York, Los Angeles, Miami, and San Francisco. People, mostly homosexual men and intravenous drug users, were dying from very rare lung infections or from a cancer known as Kaposis sarcoma. They have not seen people getting these diseases in numerous years. Soon, it also affected hemophiliacs, blood recipients, prostitutes and their customers, and babies born from AIDS-infected women. AIDS was soon recognized as a worldwide health emergency, and as a fatal disease with no known cure, that quickly became an epidemic. When high-profile victims began to contrac ...
    Related: acquired immunodeficiency, deficiency syndrome, immunodeficiency, immunodeficiency syndrome, infectious, infectious disease, syndrome
  • Introduction - 1,045 words
    ... nvertebrates. Bacteria, a form of microorganism is found throughout the ocean and make up much of the dissolved matter in the waters. They also help decompose the dead bodies of larger organisms. It obtains food and oxygen by means of chemosynthesis; a process in which the organism creates food using chemical nutrients as the energy source instead of sunlight. The bacteria live in cooperation with animals unique to this region, providing them with important nutrients. Animals without backbones are called invertebrates. Lobsters and clams are probably the most numerous and diverse group. Invertebrates in the ocean range from jellyfish to worms and crabs. Vertebrates are animals with backb ...
    Related: digestive system, pet food, decision making, aquatic, harmful
  • Lab Report - 220 words
    Lab Report Morphological Unknown Lab Report Introduction: There are many types of microorganisms in the world that may seem alike but are very different in function and purpose. That is why when one has to find what an unknown organism is he or she sees that its difficult to classify it based on its outer appearance. That is why there are many ways in order to classify microorganisms under microscopes. Two of the ways to identify microorganisms are by looking at the colony and cell morphologies or by conducting a series of stain procedures on the microorganisms. A colony is a mass of microbial cells (Colome, Ex6:28). Morphology is the colonys structure and form. There are six parameters used ...
    Related: lab report, report introduction, microorganism, edge
  • Rasmussens Encephalitis - 1,182 words
    Rasmussen's Encephalitis Keyur P. Biology...Science Rasmussen's Encephalitis The human immune system is an amazing system that is constantly on the alert protecting us from sicknesses. Thousands of white blood cells travel in our circulatory system destroying all foreign substances that could cause harm to our body or to any of the millions of processes going on inside. Now imagine a condition where this awesome system turns against the most complex organ in the human body, the brain. Deadly as it is, this condition is known as Rasmussens encephalitis. The meaningful research on Rasmussens encephalitis was begun (unintentionally) by Scott Rogers and Lorise Gahring, two neurologists, who were ...
    Related: mental capacity, human body, blood cells, measuring, directing
  • The Development And Control Of Chemical And Biological Warfare - 1,121 words
    The Development and Control of Chemical and Biological Warfare In the year 600 BC. Solon who was a legislator of the Athenians, contaminated the River Pleisthenes with "skunk cabbage" to give the defenders of Kirrha violent diseases leading to their defeat. This is the first recorded use of plants as a source of chemicals for warfare. Although not very well known, chemical and biological warfare has been used for over 2000 years. "Chemical and Biological warfare has made a huge change since 600 BC and has changed into one of the most advanced and destructive types of warfare known to man." "There are many reason why chemical and biological warfare is so effective. Throughout the medieval tim ...
    Related: biological, biological and chemical weapons, biological warfare, biological weapons, chemical warfare, chemical weapons, disease control
  • The Human Genome Project - 1,403 words
    The Human Genome Project title = The Human Genome Project The Human Genome Project, What Is It? What would you do if you were given the power to change your genetic code from brown hair to blond?. Man has had this ability through natural selection for some time without knowing it, but in the near future scientist will be able to speed the process of natural selection by changing a persons genes. Scientists have identified what constitutes human DNA located in the nucleus of a cell. The Human Genome Project was established to identify the genes that make us who we are and is now an international organization. The massive task of identifying the numerous gene combinations has created a problem ...
    Related: genome, genome project, human genome, project planning, jurassic park
  • The Origin Of Life - 1,616 words
    The Origin Of Life The origin of Life There are many theories where life came from, but none of them is proven to be the right one. The obvious theory that life originated on earth is not accepted by everyone. One reason of disbelief in this theory that life originated on earth is a lack of time. It was an early belief that life originated through a slow and long process (many scientists do not share this belief though), probably too short and too long for the time life had on our planet. Life must have been formed within a period of approximately 200 million years. If we represent the whole Christian era - two thousand years - by one inch, the time available for the emergence of life could ...
    Related: life span, origin, origin of life, protein synthesis, different kinds
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