Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: medical history

  • 30 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Abortion - 2,032 words
    Abortion Abortion in today's society has become very political. You are either pro-choice or pro-life, and there doesn't seem to be a happy medium. As we look at abortion and research its history, should it remain legal in the United States, or should it be outlawed to reduce the ever growing rate of abortion. A choice should continue to exist but the emphasis needs to be placed on education of the parties involved. James C. Mohr takes a good look at abortion in his book Abortion in America. He takes us back in history to the 1800s so we can understand how the practice and legalization of abortion has changed over the year. In the absence of any legislation whatsoever on the subject of abort ...
    Related: abortion, induced abortion, court cases, civil war, affluent
  • Aids Whats New Is The Message Getting Through We Already Know Enough About Aids To Prevent Its Spread, But Ignorance, Complac - 1,708 words
    AIDS - What's new ? ------------------- Is the message getting through? We already know enough about AIDS to prevent its spread, but ignorance, complacency, fear and bigotry continue to stop many from taking adequate precautions. We know enough about how the infection is transmitted to protect ourselves from it without resorting to such extremes as mandatory testing, enforced quarantine or total celibacy. But too few people are heeding the AIDS message. Perhaps many simply don't like or want to believe what they hear, preferring to think that AIDS "can't happen to them." Experts repeatedly remind us that infective agents do not discriminate, but can infect any and everyone. Like other commun ...
    Related: aids, whats, human cells, blood cells, usual
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,261 words
    Alzheimers Disease Alzheimers Disease We are currently living in the age of technology. Our advancements in the past few decades overshadow everything learned in the last 2000 years. With the elimination of many diseases through effective cures and treatments, humans can expect to live a much longer life then that of their grandparents. The population of the United States continues to rise, and with the baby boom era coming of age, the number of elderly people is rising as well. This increase has brought with it a large increase in diseases associated with old age. Alzheimer's dementia is one of the most common and feared diseases afflicting the elderly community. Alzheimers disease, once th ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, different types, psychoactive drugs
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,694 words
    Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer's Disease With all of the advanced technology that the medical field possesses today, there is still suffering that occurs from incurable diseases. Alzheimer's Disease is one of those incurable diseases that take the lives of many today. This paper will examine this disease thoroughly by looking at its definition, and discussing general information, facts, and figures. The cause of Alzheimer's Disease, and the much thought about question of if it is genetic or not will disputed. Also the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of Alzheimer's Disease will be addressed. Included will also be tips on how to make the life of an Alzheimer's patient easier. What is Alzheim ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, heart disease, nursing home
  • Aristotle - 847 words
    Aristotle Aristotle, Galileo, and Pasteur can be said to have contributed significantly, each in his own way, to the development of "The Scientific Method." Discuss. What is the scientific method? In general, this method has three parts, which we might call (1) gathering evidence, (2) making a hypothesis, and (3) testing the hypothesis. As scientific methodology is practiced, all three parts are used together at all stages, and therefore no theory, however rigorously tested, is ever final, but remains at all times tentative, subject to new observation and continued testing by such observation. Hellenic science was built upon the foundations laid by Thales and Pythagoras. It reached its zenit ...
    Related: aristotle, common sense, charles darwin, louis pasteur, history
  • Background Investigation - 781 words
    Background Investigation Background/Character Investigation Any precinct or department may exclude from an examination any person because of: I. Dismissal of the application or eligible from the public service for good cause, or his resignation pending charges. II. Criminal, infamous, dishonest, immoral, or notoriously disgraceful or dissolute conduct, or bad character. III. The knowingly making of a false statement by any person in his application for examination, and every connivance by him at any false statement made in any accompanying certificates, or the commission of or attempt to commit any fraud against civil service law or rules or regulations or any complicity by him in any such f ...
    Related: investigation, grammar school, law enforcement, medical history, specifications
  • Bibliography: This Is My First Biology Paper My Major Is Psychology I Attend An University In Maryland Parttime I Am A Colleg - 1,764 words
    Bibliography: This is my first Biology paper. My major is Psychology. I attend an university in Maryland part-time. I am a college Sophomore. I work in Communications. UNDERSTANDING THE AIDS VIRUS Will I live to see tomorrow? Is there a hope for the future? These are probably the most commonly asked questions among AIDS patients today. This paper delves into the heart of the AIDS topic by giving a detailed definition of the virus, risk factors associated with transmission, and the best treatment methods studied by the Centers for Disease Control, the National Institutes of Health, and other research organizations. AIDS. The word alone strikes fear into every sexually active individual. Why i ...
    Related: attend, biology, maryland, psychology, san francisco
  • Birth Control Is Defined As Various Ways Used To Prevent Pregnancy From Occurring Birth Control Has Been A Concern For Humans - 1,423 words
    Birth Control is defined as various ways used to prevent pregnancy from occurring. Birth Control has been a concern for humans for thousands of years. The first contraception devices were mechanical barriers in the vagina that prevented the male sperm from fertilizing the female egg. Other methods of birth control that were used in the vagina were sea sponges, mixtures of crocodile dung and honey, quinine, rock salt and alum. We have come a long way from past time times of contraceptives, although some of the same concepts are still used. The least effective form of birth control used today is The Natural Method. This method is also the cheapest because the woman monitors her menstrual cycle ...
    Related: birth control, ectopic pregnancy, occurring, pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections
  • Brave New World Eugenics - 903 words
    Brave New World - Eugenics In chapter II of a Brave New World Revisited by Aldous Huxley, Huxley makes some very bold statements on the current state of our nations increasing technology towards medicine. This leads to the formation of the idea that we need to institute a eugenics program. Though there are many drawbacks in using eugenics, the ultimate goal is very beneficial. Huxley gives a very clear example on why we need a system like eugenics when he states an example which involves introducing a cure for malaria to a tropical island. Suppose someone was to go to a tropical island with DDT and wipe out malaria. After two or three years, hundreds of thousands of lives are saved. Though t ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, eugenics, world war ii, ultimate goal
  • Breast Cancer - 1,682 words
    ... Cleveland added green tea to cultured cells of human lymphoma, prostate, breast and skin cancers. Amazingly, the tea killed every cancer cell, but did not harm a single normal functioning cell. Gianluca Lazzaro at the University of Illinois made a synthetic form of vitamin D5 that killed cancer cells in a lab culture. The University of Western Ontario found limonoids more effective than flavanoids in halting growth of cancer cells. Limonoids, true to the name, are responsible for the bitterness of lemons, limes, oranges, and grapefruit. Walt Willet of the Harvard School of Public Health conducted a study of 89,538 nurses between the ages of 3459. He found for those that consume hard liq ...
    Related: american cancer, breast, breast augmentation, breast cancer, breast implants, cancer, cancer center
  • Bursitis Injury - 509 words
    Bursitis Injury j Bursitis Does it hurt to move your arm? Is it tender and radiating pain to your neck and finger tips? Do you have a fever? If you answered yes to two or more of these questions then you may have typical joint injury called bursitis. Bursitis is an inflammation of the bursa that is easily prevented, detected and treated. Bursitis is a common condition that can cause much pain and swelling around an affected bursa. A bursa is a sac between body tissues that move against each other. They are filled with a lubricating liquid to minimize the fiction between the tissues. The bursa are found mostly in joints between skin and bone or bone and tendons. When you irritate these lubric ...
    Related: bursitis, injury, family medical, medical history, wear
  • Chinese Medicine - 1,489 words
    Chinese Medicine Acupuncture, Qigong, and Chinese Medicine Stephen Barrett, M.D. Chinese medicine, often called Oriental medicine or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), encompasses a vast array of folk medical practices based on mysticism. It holds that the body's vital energy (chi or qi) circulates through 14 channels, called meridians, that have branches connected to bodily organs and functions. Illness is attributed to imbalance or interruption of chi.. Ancient practices such as acupuncture and Qigong are claimed to restore balance. Traditional acupuncture, as now practiced, involves the insertion of stainless steel needles into various body areas. A low-frequency current may be applied t ...
    Related: chinese, chinese medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, oriental medicine, traditional chinese, traditional chinese medicine
  • Consumer Health - 1,543 words
    Consumer Health Is Consumer Health and Safety in Jeopardy With the implementation of Self-Prescription Drug Internet Sites? Amanda C. Feitner GUS 72-001: Urban Affairs-Consumers In the Marketplace: Your Legal Rights and Responsibilities. Prof. John E. Kelly, J.D. April 17, 2000 The expeditious augmentation of consumer product transactions taking place on the Internet have developed new risk for the public's health and safety, especially with the rise of online self-prescription drug sites. Online Pharmacies have been created to benefit the consumer but pose many risks for credulous purchasers, increased health fraud, and unique challenges to regulators, law enforcement, and policymakers. Wit ...
    Related: consumer, consumer product, health, health care, health care professionals, health concerns, health issues
  • Contraceptives - 1,385 words
    Contraceptives The practice of birth control prevents conception, thus limiting reproduction. The term birth control, coined by Margaret SANGER in 1914, usually refers specifically to methods of contraception, including STERILIZATION. The terms family planning and planned parenthood have a broader application. METHODS OF BIRTH CONTROL Attempts to control fertility have been going on for thousands of years. References to preventing conception are found in the writings of priests, philosophers, and physicians of ancient Egypt and Greece. Some methods, though crude, were based on sound ideas. For example, women were advised to put honey, olive oil, or oil of cedar in their vaginas to act as bar ...
    Related: contraceptives, oral contraceptives, olive oil, food and drug administration, lemon
  • Diagnosis And Treatment Of Depression In The Elderly - 1,176 words
    Diagnosis and Treatment of Depression in the Elderly Mental disorders are becoming more prevalent in todays society as people add stress and pressure to their daily lives. The elderly population is not eliminated as a candidate for a disorder just because they may be retired. In fact, mental disorders affect 1 in 5 elderly people. One would think that with disorders being rather prevalent in this age group that there would be an abundance of treatment programs, but this is not the case. Because the diagnosis of an individuals mental state is subjective in nature, many troubled people go untreated regularly (summer 1998). Depression in the elderly population is a common occurrence, yet the di ...
    Related: diagnosis, elderly, elderly people, treating depression, treatment of depression, treatment programs
  • Epilepsy - 855 words
    Epilepsy Epilepsy - The Silent Stalker By Steven Voskanian What is Epilepsy? Epilepsy, also called seizure disorder, chronic brain disorder that briefly interrupts the normal electrical activity of the brain to cause seizures, characterized by a variety of symptoms including uncontrolled movements of the body, disorientation or confusion, sudden fear, or loss of consciousness. Epilepsy may result from a head injury, stroke, brain tumor, lead poisoning, genetic conditions, or severe infections like meningitis or encephalitis. In over 70 percent of cases no cause for epilepsy were identified. About 1 percent of the world population, or over 2 million people, are diagnosed with epilepsy. How th ...
    Related: epilepsy, temporal lobe, young children, medical history, classified
  • Ethics Of Animal Testing - 1,763 words
    Ethics Of Animal Testing This theme song to a popular cartoon is a farce dealing with experiments carried out on animals. In the cartoon one mouse is made very smart and wants to take over the world while the other is clearly not as smart. While the cartoon makes jokes, the reality is that mice and other animals re being used for medical tests every day. For some people this testing brings up ethical questions. One of the biggest questions: is it really necessary to take the lives of animals in the name of science and for the betterment of humanity? For animal rights activists, like People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the answer is no. PETA pressures labs into halting experim ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal liberation, animal research, animal rights, animal rights movement, animal testing, animal welfare
  • Gentic Engineering - 2,250 words
    ... ilities; the difficulties lie not in the means of production, but in the relations of production, the social and political context in which the technology is deployed. A second, and far less Marxian observation, is that social domination has some biological determinants. Patriarchy is, in part, based on women's physical vulnerability, and their special role in reproduction. While industrialization, contraception and the liberal democratic state may have removed the bulk of patriarchy's weight, genetic technology offers to remove the rest. Similarly, while racism, ageism, heterosexism, and so on may be only 10% biological and 90% social construction, at least the biological factors can be ...
    Related: engineering, genetic engineering, animal research, medical research, tier
  • Hypertension - 722 words
    Hypertension Hypertension is a common disorder characterized by a sustained elevation of systolic arterial pressure (top number) of 140 mm Hg or higher, or a diastolic arterial pressure (bottom number) of 90 mm Hg or greater, or both. Hypertension is divided into two categories: essential (or primary) hypertension and secondary hypertension. Etiology: Research has shown that hypernatremia (elevated serum sodium) increases the volume of blood, which raises blood pressure. Primary hypertension may also develop from alterations in other bosy chemicals. For some clients who respond to stress at a higher degree, hypertension may be related to a higher degree, hypertension may be related to a high ...
    Related: hypertension, weight loss, high blood pressure, medical history, muscle
  • Knowledge And Perceived Risk Of Major Diseases - 1,285 words
    ... r some of the areas have not significantly affected the results of the study (Wilcox and Stefanick, 1999). Information about the women who filled out the survey was their age, marital status, education level and ethnic origins. The sample size used in this study was small and therefore race was not equally represented. The racial makeup of the sample group was made up of mostly Whites and there was a small percentage of Non-Whites in the study so the conductors of the study decided to divide the participants into two groups racially, Whites and Non-Whites, for all the "primary analyses" of the survey. Other variables reported in the study that were measured were the risk factors women de ...
    Related: cardiovascular disease, chronic disease, disease control, risk reduction, likert scale
  • 30 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2