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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: margaret

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  • A Natural Curiosity By Margaret Drabble - 471 words
    A Natural Curiosity by Margaret Drabble Running along the same lines as a daytime soap opera, Margaret Drabbles A Natural Curiosity provides pertinent information about life in Northam, England, a small, quaint town just outside of London, during the mid to late 1900s. Drabble narrates the novel in third person omniscient which allows her to venture into the minds of the diverse characters. Although there exists a black and white central conflict, all of the minor conflicts stem from Alix Bowen, the first, and most essential individual. In one way or another, all of the people share some distinct connection with Alix Bowen. Drabbles description of Alix Bowens obsession with a murderer named ...
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  • Character Analysis Of Estelle In Margaret Atwoods Rape Fantasies - 1,236 words
    Character Analysis of Estelle in Margaret Atwood's "Rape Fantasies" Anyway Estelle is the only thoroughly developed character in Margaret Atwood's "Rape Fantasies." Though she is the narrator and quite thoughtful of the ideas and reactions of the story's supporting players, it is her almost obsessive preoccupation with a singular topic that actually prompts her to fully illustrate her own ideas and reactions, drawing a character far more compelling than any of the men or women she will attempt to describe. Estelle begins her story and ruminations swiftly. She considers rape, how rape has recently been treated like a new scourge, and how essays and tips on rape prevention have become somethin ...
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  • Comparison Of Margaret Meads Coming In Age To Russian Youth - 1,277 words
    Comparison of Margaret Mead's "Coming in Age" to Russian Youth In an attempt to challenge societal values, youth cultures, in the form of rebellion, act and dress radically and form groups in protest. These dissident actions against the structure of existing society promotes the beginning of new small groups which reflect their own rules, structures, class, gender and ethnic ideologies. So, the youth culture, in challenging societal values, at the same time is reflecting them. In comparing Margaret Mead's young adults in Coming of Age in Samoa to Russian youth it is evident where the differences arise. The Samoans strong cultural values leave little need for individual expression. Expectatio ...
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  • Comparison Of Margaret Meads Coming In Age To Russian Youth - 1,312 words
    ... most important goal is the teaching of collectivism (kollektiv). Students learn that improving society is more important than self well-being which is selfish and not for the good of the whole. "Children are not praised for being different from their classmates; rather, they are told that it is impolite to show off what they know...Games also emphasize the group rather than the individual...the concept of uniformity dominates almost all of their lessons." They begin kindergarten at three or younger and are subjected to strict military-type discipline and collective behaviour. At nap time, which is for one and one half hours, they are forbidden to get up, even to go to the washroom (Trav ...
    Related: comparison, margaret, russian, russian government, russian orthodox, youth culture
  • Identity And Margaret Atwoods Lady Oracle - 1,744 words
    Identity And Margaret Atwood's Lady Oracle The relationships we have with different people throughout our lives are strong influences on us all. Our relationships with one another can define who we are, as well as the quality of the lives we lead. Strenuous relationships cause stress and unhappiness, while close, loving relationships are a source of support and comfort. Joan Foster, the main character in Margaret Atwood=s Lady Oracle, is a complex woman who has had more than her share of turbulent relationships during her life. From her childhood and teenage relationship with her mother, to her bond with her husband later in life, Joan=s relationships are rarely free of turmoil and drama. Th ...
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  • Juliet Margaret Cameron Was A Pioneer Victorian Photographer During The Nineteenth Century She Took Up Photography Later In L - 489 words
    Juliet Margaret Cameron was a Pioneer Victorian photographer during the nineteenth century. She took up photography later in life at the age forty-eight when her daughter presented her with a camera. This simple gift sparked enthusiasm in Cameron and led her to become one of the most colorful personalities in photography. Cameron was born in Calcutta in 1815 to a well to do British Family. After being educated in Europe, she returned to the Cape of Good Hope in 1836. While she was there she met Charles Hay Cameron, whom she married in 1838. On Charles' retirement in 1848, they moved to London, the Isle of Wright, where Julia Margaret became part of Kensington's artistic community. In 1863, R ...
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  • Margaret Atwood - 1,339 words
    Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood is an acclaimed poet, novelist, and short story writer. With such a variety of works in different types of writing, it is difficult to grasp every aspect of Atwood's purpose of writing. A comparative analysis of Rape Fantasies reveals the Atwood's writing is varied in many ways yet soundly consistent especially when comparing a particular set of writing such as a group of her other short stories. Atwood's background plays a large part in her writing. Atwood was born in Ottawa, Canada in 1913. Her father was an entomologist, so she spent much of her childhood in the wilderness and other various urban places around Canada. Throughout her life, she lived in numer ...
    Related: atwood, margaret, margaret atwood, men and women, literary criticism
  • Margaret Atwood - 1,415 words
    ... ome another one of the social problems that they face by getting a conversation going with someone who is intending on raping you. Atwood appears to be making a comment on the strength of women and how she thinks that a society could be changed just by talking. The subject matter of "Rape Fantasies" is parallel with that of her other works. The most important factor is the relationships between male and female. The female relationships in "Fantasies" are very close. Atwood makes the women seem like they have a tight enough bond to be talking about rape together, yet they do not know each other well enough that they will not talk behind the others back. The flow of conversation that Atwoo ...
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  • Margaret Atwood - 1,217 words
    Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood is a widely recognized literary figure, especially known for her themes of feminism. Her novels, including Alias Grace and The Handmaid's Tale are widely known for their feminist subject matter, and one finds the same powerful themes within her poetry. Judy Klemesrud, in her article for The New York Times, once made the wise acknowledgement that "People follow her on the streets and in stores, seeking autographs and wanting to discuss the characters in her novels- most of whom are intelligent, self-absorbed modern women searching for identity. These women also suffer greatly, and as a result, some Canadian critics have dubbed her 'the high priestess of angst'" ...
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  • Margaret Atwood - 1,198 words
    ... vement which rejects love and men and all things traditional. Atwood's first few lines reduce the word "love" to an object of convenience. Her words are highly discouraging, as "love" is merely something sold for commercial value ("add lace on it . . .") and cutesy magazine advertisements "There are whole/ magazines with not much in them/ but the word love, you can/ rub it all over your body and you/ can cook with it too"(802). Again, here we see a bit more of the feminist theme we've come to expect from Margaret Atwood. She expertly mocks the type of women's literature that provides its reader's with mushy romance, heavy perfumes, and cooking recipes. Yet, as before, it is important to ...
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  • Margaret Atwood - 1,248 words
    Margaret Atwood "There is so much silence between the words..." SOCI 4019 September 29, 1999. An Overview of Works, Styles, and Themes Margaret Atwood has written a great number of novels and other forms of literature. The major press editions are as follows: ~ WORKS~ Poetry 1964, The Cirle Game 1968, The Animals in That Country 1970, The Journals of Susanna Moodie 1970, Procedures for Underground 1971, Power Politics 1974, You are Happy 1978, Selected Poems 1978, Two-Headed Poems 1981, True Stories 1984, Interlunar 1987, Selected Poems II: Poems Selected and New, 1976-1986 1990, Selected Poems 1966-1975 1995, Morning in the Burned House Short Fiction 1977, "Dancing Girls" 198 ...
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  • Margaret Bourkewhite - 1,760 words
    Margaret Bourke-White Margaret Bourke-White was born on June 14th, 1904, in the Bronx, New York. Her father, Joseph White, was an inventor and engineer, and her mother, Minnie Bourke, was forward thinking woman, especially for the early 1900's. When Margaret was very young, the family moved to a rural suburb in New Jersey, so that Joseph could be closer to his job. Margaret, along with her sister Ruth, were taught from an early age by their mother. Her mother was strict in monitoring their outside influences, limiting everything from fried foods to funny papers. When Margaret was eight, her father took her inside a foundry to watch the manufacture of printing presses. While in the foundry, s ...
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  • Margaret Mead Was A Great Scientist, Explorer, Writer, And Teacher, Who Educated The Human Race In Many Different Ways In The - 333 words
    Margaret Mead was a great scientist, explorer, writer, and teacher, who educated the human race in many different ways. In the next few paragraphs I will discuss the different ways Margaret Mead, Anthropologist, effected our society. Margaret Mead was born in Philadelphia on December 16, 1901, and was educated at Barnard College and at Columbia University. In 1926 she became assistant curator of ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, and she served as associate curator and as curator. She was director of research in contemporary cultures at Columbia University from 1948 to 1950 and professor of anthropology there after 1954. Participating in several field exped ...
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  • Margaret Sanger - 1,513 words
    Margaret Sanger The early twentieth century was a turning point in American history-especially in regards to the acquisition of women's rights. While the era was considered to be prosperous and later thought to be a happy-go-lucky time, in actuality, it was a time of grave social conflict and human suffering (Parish, 110). Among those who endured much suffering were women. As Margaret Sanger found out, women, especially those who were poor, had no choice regarding pregnancy. The only way not to get pregnant was by not having sex- a choice that was almost always the husband's. This was even more true in the case of lower-class men for whom, 'sex was the poor man's only luxury' (Douglas, 31). ...
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  • Margaret, Prioress And Mystic - 1,429 words
    Margaret, Prioress And Mystic Margaret of Oingt was one of the many women living during the Middle Ages who turned to mysticism to become closer to God. Mysticism, unlike scholasticism, takes a direct approach to God using sensory perception, not reason. For this purpose, it allowed women to identify with God on a very personal and spiritual level. This is significant to Margaret's rationalism for writing her visions in a time when women had such a trivial amount of power in the intellectual community; she did not write her visions for others to learn from, but rather as a personal form of worship to God. In her compositions Margaret describes herself as having almost no importance or author ...
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  • Rape Fantasies By Margaret Atwood - 446 words
    Rape Fantasies By Margaret Atwood Irony is the use of words to express something different from and opposite to their literal meaning. It is used with tone and style to create humorous situations. There are various forms of irony. Margaret Atwood uses situational irony, dramatic irony, and verbal irony in "Rape Fantasies". Situational irony refers to circumstances in which bad things happen to good people, or in which rewards are not earned because forces beyond human comprehension seem to be in total control. Margaret Atwood uses situational irony in Estelle's first rape fantasy. Rapists are violent criminals that violate women physically, mentally, and emotionally. Estelle's would-be rapis ...
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  • Ruth Benedict Margaret Mead - 432 words
    Ruth Benedict & Margaret Mead Ruth Benedict & Margaret Mead After high school, Ruth Benedict took a year off to travel overseas. Upon returning home she was unsure of what she wanted to do with her life. Years later, she married Stanley Benedict, a Biochemistry Professor at Cornell Medical School. In the fall of 1919, Ruth went back to school and began to focus more on anthropology. She studied under the famous diffusionist Franz Boas and became his assistant. Ruth taught Margaret Mead. Ruth and Margaret became good friends and developed a shared need of each other. Ruth concentrated most of her efforts on researching and studying different cultures on which many of her writings were based. ...
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  • The Stone Angel By Margaret Laurence - 1,556 words
    The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence is a heart-warming story of a ninety year old woman who is nearing death and who has very little to look back on with pride. Her life had been ruled by her concern of outward appearances and manners. Although she often felt love and happiness, she refused to show it fearing it may be viewed by others as a weakness. Hagar inherited this strong pride from her father, Jason Currie, along with other poor qualities. Throughout her life, Hagar is desperately trying to escape. First, she tries to escape from her family, mostly her father, but in so doing she also cuts herself off from her brother, Matt. She also ends up leavi ...
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  • 13 Were The Elizabethans More Bloodthirsty Or Tolerant Of - 1,288 words
    13. Were the Elizabethans more bloodthirsty or tolerant of violence on stage than we are? In addition to the visible bloodletting, there is endless discussion of past gory deeds. Offstage violence is even brought into view in the form of a severed head. It's almost as though such over-exposure is designed to make it ordinary. At the same time, consider the basic topic of the play, the usurpation of the crown of England and its consequences. These are dramatic events. They can support the highly charged atmosphere of bloody actions on stage as well as off. By witnessing Clarence's murder, which has been carefully set up, we develop a greater revulsion for its instigator. And even though we ar ...
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  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 2,024 words
    3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults Religion is primary agent of social control in our society. Due to its communally held beliefs and principles, we have a foundation on which we can rest the laws, values, and the main doctrine, of almost any society. Here in America, we have tremendous freedom in both establishing and in choosing the religion of our choice. This freedom has given birth to many non-traditional religions and practices. When discussing the topic of social control and order within a society, these non-traditional religions can be used very strongly to bring about social change within an individual then into the population. On the rise in our nation, is the ...
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