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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: louisiana purchase

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  • Louisiana Purchase - 2,518 words
    Louisiana Purchase Several great American Statesmen were pivotal in shaping and molding the government of the United States. History has since forgotten some of these founding fathers. The ones remembered throughout history are those we hold up for their accomplishments. Thomas Jefferson is one of the American Statesmen that stands out from the rest as being one of the greatest contributors to our present form of government. Historian Robert Tucker described Jefferson's life as being a paradox. He was a slave holder that was not necessarily in favor of this form of servitude. He also associated himself with the yeoman farmer, yet he traveled in company with a cosmopolitan flair. So it is to ...
    Related: louisiana, louisiana purchase, louisiana territory, purchase, declaration of independence
  • Louisiana Purchase - 2,546 words
    ... ferson considered his options. He could either ask congress to amend the Constitution to allow the new territory into the Union, or quietly submit the treaty for ratification. Attorney General Levi Lincoln suggested that Jefferson boldly announce and defend the constitutionality of the purchase in his message to Congress. Jefferson's Secretary of the Treasury, Albert Gallatin, was quick to discount this suggestion with his own opinion on the subject. Gallatin noted that if it was unlawful for the United States Government to acquire territory then it would be just as unlawful for individual states to do so. Gallatin went on to advise Jefferson that the United States as a nation has the ri ...
    Related: louisiana, louisiana purchase, louisiana territory, purchase, john marshall
  • 5 Most Influential People In American History - 1,556 words
    5 Most Influential People In American History The United Sates has had a short yet complex history in its two hundred and twenty-four years. She has produced millions and millions of great individuals. These great minds have shaped what America is today. Others, however, have personally molded this magnificent nation with their own acts. John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson are the most influential builders of the United States of America. John Adams was born loyal to the English Crown but evolved into the second President of the Free World. As a lawyer, Adams emerged into politics as an opponent of the Stamp Act and was a leader in the Revolutionary gro ...
    Related: american, american congress, american history, american revolution, american system, history, influential
  • American Expansion - 214 words
    American Expansion In a sense, the United States has been expansionistic from its very beginning. The 13 English colonies, clinging to the eastern seaboard, were determined to push westward despite all natural and political obstacles. Once established as a nation, the United States went about acquiring even more land, including Florida, the Louisiana Purchase, and the Mexican Cession. The expansion associated with the late nineteenth century was just one chapter in a long book. One can begin writting a paper anout expansion of the U.S. beginning with the founding of the colonies. Colonial expansion involved many resons- land hunger, flight from religious persecution, etc.- The next main expa ...
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  • Book Report On Thomas Jefferson - 1,051 words
    Book Report On Thomas Jefferson Book Review on Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson by Norman Risjord is a biography of the third president of the United States that takes Thomas Jefferson from his youth through his later years in the early 19th century. The purpose of this book is to give a political and social overview of the Thomas Jefferson's life and career. It was written for both the student of American history and the casual reader interested in the genesis of the United States government, seen through the eyes of one of its founding fathers. The value of this book is that it shows that Jefferson was not a saint, yet he was one of the most intelligent presidents that the country has eve ...
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  • Boone, Daniel 17341820was An American Pioneer, Who Played A Major Part In The Exploration And Settlement Of Kentucky - 876 words
    Boone, Daniel (1734-1820)was an American pioneer, who played a major part in the exploration and settlement of Kentucky. Boone was born on November 2, 1734, near Reading, Pennsylvania. In 1753 his family settled on the Yadkin River in what is now North Carolina. In this primitive settlement Boone received some schooling and became a skillful hunter and trapper. He served with the forces led by the British general Edward Braddock in the campaign in 1755 against Fort Duquesne during the French and Indian War. Subsequently Boone set out to explore and settle the wilderness around the Kentucky River, making the first of many trips into the region in 1767. Between 1769 and 1771, on his most impor ...
    Related: american, american frontier, american revolution, daniel, exploration, kentucky, native american
  • Causes Of The Mexican War - 1,613 words
    Causes of the Mexican War The Mexican War lasted from 1846-1848 in the area now known as Texas. What began as several small disputes eventually led into an armed conflict between the considerably new nations of Mexico and the United States. The geographical and political disputes are the most likely causes of the war. These causes of this war became significant, when the outcome gave the United States a platform to become one of the most powerful countries in the world. The first sign of problems between the two countries began when the United States bordered Mexico after the Louisiana Purchase. "With these areas now available, American settlers began to move into them, and from there, they ...
    Related: mexican, mexican american, republic of texas, manifest destiny, decade
  • Civil War Inevitability - 1,220 words
    Civil War Inevitability THE INEVITABILITY OF THE BREAKUP OF THE UNION By Sam Tooker The breakup of the Union was inevitable. The south was always going to secede; it was just a question of when. The southern and northern states varied on many issues. There were deep economic, social, and political differences between the north and the south. All of this was a different interpretation of the United States Constitution on both sides. In the end, all of these disagreements led to the Civil War. There were reasons other than slavery for the souths secession.(5) The south relied heavily on agriculture, as opposed to the north which was highly populated by factories. The south grew cotton, which w ...
    Related: civil war, inevitability, kansas-nebraska act, republican party, utah
  • Constitution - 1,417 words
    Constitution When the Constitution of the United States was first created in 1787, its purpose was to unify our country. However, by 1850, the United States had become 'source of sectional discord and tension and ultimately contributed to the failure of the union it had created.' What happened during the 63 years after it was first established to 'contribute to the failure of the union it had created?' One must look at what the Constitution promoted to make the country unified and what it did to make it disunified. Compromises such as 3/5, the Missouri, and the tariff of 1850 all helped to unify and shape our country. However, compromises such as the Fugitive Slave Law, Popular Sovereignty, ...
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  • George Rogers Clark - 1,349 words
    George Rogers Clark Who was George Rogers Clark? This is probably a question most people in America couldn't answer. The reason is very simple, George Rogers Clark was a hero in an age of heroism. He simply could not compare with the legends of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and other Revolutionary War heroes. Clark nevertheless is very important, especially to the people of Kentucky, Illinois, and Indiana who became apart of the United States of America because of his great leadership and bravery in military campaigns at Kaskaskia, Illinois and Vincennes, Indiana during the Revolutionary War. George Rogers Clark was born in Albermale County, Virginia on November 19, 1752 to John and An ...
    Related: clark, george washington, james madison, thomas jefferson, surveyor
  • George Rogers Clark - 1,381 words
    ... e of going to battle with him and his troops, or having peaceful relationship. The Indians chose the white belt of peace and they and Clark's forces smoked from the peace pipe and partied all night. After this act of diplomacy, George Rogers Clark and his forces had no further problems with the Indians from this area. Now Clark could give all his attention to attacking Hamilton and his British Troops at Fort Sackville in Vincennes. Upon hearing of the conquering of Kaskaskia Governor Hamilton and about 500 troops came to Vincennes from Detroit to secure Fort Sackville. Clark hearing of this and Hamilton's plan to attack Kaskaskia, capture him and join the British forces in the East was p ...
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  • History - 1,312 words
    History Pre-Civil War New Orleans New Orleans is a city in southern Louisiana, located on the Mississippi River. Most of the city is situated on the east bank, between the river and Lake Pontchartrain to the north. Because it was built on a great turn of the river, it is known as the Crescent City. New Orleans, with a population of 496,938 (1990 census), is the largest city in Louisiana and one of the principal cities of the South. It was established on the high ground nearest the mouth of the Mississippi, which is 177 km (110 mi) downstream. Elevations range from 3.65 m (12 ft) above sea level to 2 m (6.5 ft) below; as a result, an ingenious system of water pumps, drainage canals, and levee ...
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  • Jeffersonian Republicans - 984 words
    Jeffersonian Republicans (1) Some English observers may have viewed Jeffersonian Republicans as hypocritical for several reasons. Jefferson ran for the presidency in order to achieve specific goals such as, the reduction of the size and cost of the federal government, the repeal of Federalist legislation, and to maintain international peace. Jefferson was successful for some time in reducing the size and cost of the federal government. He closed several American embassies in Europe. He cut military spending by reducing the size of the U.S. Army by 50 percent and retiring a majority of the navy's warships. However, despite all these cut expenses, Jefferson found it suitable to accommodate the ...
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  • Jeffersons Party - 391 words
    Jefferson's Party The view that many believe while studying our countrys political history is the Federalist Party was a dedicated supporter of a strong central government. They believed that the Constitution was a document that needed to be molded and amended in order to meet the needs of the country. The traditional view of the Democratic- Republican party is that they support states rights and feel that most of the governing of the country should be done on the state level. The Democratic- Republicans, or Jeffersonian Republicans, also believed in reading the Constitution fundamentally and grant the government powers that were addressed in the document. These views are the basic principal ...
    Related: democratic republican party, federalist party, republican party, political history, central government
  • John Quincy Adams Was Born In 1767 In Braintree Now Quincy, Massachusetts, And Was The Second Child Of Two Children He Was Th - 995 words
    John Quincy Adams was born in 1767 in Braintree (now Quincy), Massachusetts, and was the second child of two children. He was the sixth president of the United States, and devoted his life to serving the people. Of the 81 years he lived, 50 were spent in public office. His service ended only with his death at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. Adams career of public service was one of the most varied in the colonies. He served as a diplomat, senator, secretary of state, president, and, for the last 17 years of his life, member of the House of Representatives. During the war of 1763 between France and Great Britain, some Americans followed Thomas Jefferson and urged support of France, but m ...
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  • Maturation Of The Plantation System, 17761860 - 1,034 words
    Maturation Of The Plantation System, 1776-1860 In the essay, Maturation of the Plantation System 1776-1860, John B. Boles writes about the evolution of the Southern way of life from the end of the Revolutionary war to the beginning of the Civil war. Unlike the North, the South depended on agricultural products for revenue such as sugar, indigo, and tobacco, but mainly cotton in the later years. In order to produce these products, the plantation owners of the South used the cheapest labor available, which was slave labor. Slavery evolved to become the backbone of the South. Slavery was upheld in the early stages of the United States because Southern slaveholders referred to their slaves as pr ...
    Related: maturation, plantation, early stages, deep south, british
  • Nuhpohleeuhn - 1,221 words
    ... restored, Bonaparte extended French influence into Holland (the Batavian Republic), Switzerland (the Helvetic Republic), and Savoy-Piedmont, which was annexed to France; he played the major role in the Imperial Recess (1803), by which the free cities and minor states of the HOLY ROMAN EMPIRE were consolidated; and he attempted to extend the French colonial empire, principally by recovering Haiti (see LOUISIANA PURCHASE). As a result of these policies and his refusal to grant trade concessions to Britain, war was renewed in 1803. Bonaparte organized an army of 170,000 to invade Britain, but his complex strategy to draw the British fleets away from Britain failed. Meanwhile, Austria also ...
    Related: pope pius, holy roman, russian army, republic, russian
  • On March Fourth, 1801, Thomas Jefferson Was Elected President - 1,146 words
    On March fourth, 1801, Thomas Jefferson was elected President of the United States of America. Thomas Jefferson was a Republican. Republicans strongly supported farmers, and they wanted an agrarian nation. An agrarian nation means some changes had to be made in the country. The country needed strong trade with other countries, and they also needed more land to farm on. This led to the Louisiana Purchase. The French owned a huge amount of land west of the United States. Inside all of this land was the mouth of the Mississippi River, New Orleans. Because the Republicans wanted a farming nation, America needed a port like New Orleans. Jefferson didn't think that Napoleon would sell all of this ...
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  • Sixteen Most Significant Events In Us History Between 1789 To 1975 - 4,278 words
    Sixteen Most Significant Events in US History between 1789 to 1975 After a review of United States' history from 1789 to 1975, I have identified what I believe are the sixteen most significant events of that time period. The attached sheet identifies the events and places them in brackets by time period. The following discussion provides my reasoning for selecting each of the events and my opinion as to their relative importance in contrast to each other. Finally, I have concluded that of the sixteen events, the Civil War had the most significant impact on the history of the time period in which it occurred and remains the most significant event in American history. The discussion begins wit ...
    Related: american history, history, significant events, significant impact, sixteen, states history, united states history
  • The Causes Of The Civil War - 1,443 words
    The Causes Of The Civil War The Political War The North and South fought over politics, mainly the idea of slavery. Basically the South wanted and needed it and the North did not want it at all. The South was going to do anything they could to keep it. This was the issue that overshadowed all others. At this time the labor force in the South had about 4 million slaves. These slaves were very valuable to the slaveholding planter class. They were a huge investment to Southerners and if taken away, could mean massive losses to everyone. Slaves were used in the South as helpers in the fields in the cultivation of tobacco, rice, and indigo, as well as many other jobs. The South especially needed ...
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