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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: literary critic

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  • An Analysis Of Hamlet - 391 words
    An Analysis Of Hamlet It is reasonable to wonder what Shakespeare had in mind while writing Hamlet. After all, Shakespeare wasn't a philosopher or historian,or even a literary critic. He was a playwright. He didn't leave us critical essays examining his work. It is left to us to examine his work and decide for ourselves, if we care to, what Shakespeare was thinking. Did he know that he was writing a drama of deep psychological significance, a play which would eventually be viewed and read the world over, produced many times over hundreds of years, taught in schools, and thought of as one of the world's greatest plays? I, for one, imagine him dotting the i in the last word of the play, silenc ...
    Related: hamlet, last word, critical essays, king lear, shakespeare's
  • As I Walked Into The Lecture Hall, I Saw People Ranging From The Literary Communitys Elite To High School Students Taking My - 880 words
    As I walked into the lecture hall, I saw people ranging from the literary communitys elite to high school students. Taking my seat, the crowd hushed as a rather distinguished looking man walked to the podium. The man prepared his notes and I waited silently in awe of his presence, anticipating his words of wisdom. I knew this was a gentleman who knew what he was talking about that is, until he opened his mouth. My first impressions of Professor Dunne, a visiting literary critic, were torn to shreds over the few hours at Griffith Universitys lecture hall as I listened to him criticise Australian poetry. I was stunned to hear the comments of this man (who had graced our shores only a few hour ...
    Related: elite, high school, lecture, literary critic, school students
  • C S Lewis - 994 words
    C. S. Lewis C. S. Lewis, a well-known author and apologist, is best known by people of all ages for his seven volume series entitled The Chronicles of Narnia. As Lewis wrote about the land of Narnia, an imaginary world visited by children of this world, he had two obvious purposes: to entertain the readers and to suggest analogies of the Christian faith. Although some feel that his stories are violent, Lewis is successful at using fiction to open peoples hearts to accepting Christ as their Savior because he first entertains the audience with a wonderful story. Lewis talked about how he came to write the books of Narnia, saying that they "all began with a picture of a Faun carrying an umbrell ...
    Related: c. s. lewis, lewis, literary critic, new jersey, cornell
  • Death Of Salesman And Crucible - 5,122 words
    Death Of Salesman And Crucible Arthur Miller, winner of many literary and dramatic awards, is an incredibly influential force in American drama. His plays deal with issues common to every society. He makes the audience face fault, weakness, and ignorance; subjects we would typical hide from. At the same time he emphasizes strength, human spirit, and familial love. Alice Griffin believes that Miller's plays are important internationally (xii). He belongs to an international theater rather than a regional theater (Heilman 170). His plays are staged and studied by students to understand American life in Russia, P and, Iceland, Brazil, Italy, France, Germany, Czech Republic, and China to name a ...
    Related: crucible, death of a salesman, salesman, the crucible, make sense
  • Edgar Poe - 626 words
    Edgar Poe Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston on January 19, 1809. Orphaned at the age of three, Edgar was sent to a foster home where he lived with the Allans in Richmond, VA until he married his thirteen-year-old cousin, Virginia Clemm. Throughout his youth, Edgar experienced rocky relations with the Allans and was eventually disowned before his marriage. (Compton's, pp. 401-02) Edgar Allan Poe's short stories and poems induce disturbing emotions which stem from an unstable childhood as a result of a disjointed family life. After leaving his broken foster home, Poe enlisted in the army under the name Edgar A. Perry in 1827. Aspiring to become an officer in hopes to regain favor with Mr. All ...
    Related: edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, literary critic, virginia clemm
  • Ethan Fromes Psych - 1,011 words
    Ethan Frome's Psych. Ethan Frome as a Psychological Novel When Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote his novel, The Scarlet Letter, he was praised as being the father of the psychological novel. Since the completion of his landmark story, many other authors have taken their work in similar directions and have tried to reveal human psychology through their writing. Authors have been trying to convey truths about human behavior and explain the human psyche, often unsuccessfully. Edith Whartons novel, Ethan From, is an excellent example of a novel that succeeds in revealing truths. She fills her characters with nuances that reflect the subconscious and her setting is alive with reflected symbolism. She is ...
    Related: ethan, ethan frome, psych, nathaniel hawthorne, edith wharton
  • Hamlet Minor Characters - 1,263 words
    Hamlet Minor Characters It is reasonable to wonder what Shakespeare had in mind while writing Hamlet. After all, Shakespeare wasn't a philosopher or historian, or even a literary critic. He was a playwright. He didn't leave critical essays examining his work. It is left to us to examine his work and decide for ourselves, if we care to, what Shakespeare was thinking. Did he know that he was writing a drama of deep psychological significance, a play which would eventually be viewed and read the world over, produced many times over hundreds of years, taught in schools, and thought of as one of the world's greatest plays? I, for one, imagine him crossing the "t" in the last word of the play, put ...
    Related: hamlet, ophelia hamlet, last word, king lear, historian
  • It Is Reasonable To Wonder What Shakespeare Had In Mind While Writing Hamlet After All, Shakespeare Wasnt A Philosopher Or Hi - 1,259 words
    It is reasonable to wonder what Shakespeare had in mind while writing Hamlet. After all, Shakespeare wasn't a philosopher or historian, or even a literary critic. He was a playwright. He didn't leave critical essays examining his work. It is left to us to examine his work and decide for ourselves, if we care to, what Shakespeare was thinking. Did he know that he was writing a drama of deep psychological significance, a play which would eventually be viewed and read the world over, produced many times over hundreds of years, taught in schools, and thought of as one of the world's greatest plays? I, for one, imagine him crossing the t in the last word of the play, putting down his pen, and say ...
    Related: hamlet, ophelia hamlet, philosopher, reasonable, shakespeare, wasnt
  • John - 1,352 words
    John Dryden John Dryden was England's most outstanding and controversial writer for the later part of the seventeenth century, dominating the literary world as a skilled and versatile dramatist, a pioneer of literary criticism, and a respected writer of the Restoration period. With Dryden's great literary and critical influence on the English society during the Restoration period he has made a name for himself, which will be studied and honored for years to come. John Dryden was born in Northamptonshire, in 1631. His parents were Erasmus Dryden and Mary Pickery. They were both from wealthy and respected families in Northamptonshire. The Drydens were known for wisdom and great tradition all o ...
    Related: father john, john dryden, love story, church of england, lucy
  • John Conrad - 1,409 words
    John Conrad One of the finest stylist of modern English literature was Joseph Conrad, was a Polish-born English novelist, short story writer, essayist, dramatist, and autobiographer. Conrad was born in 1857 in a Russian-ruled Province of Poland. According to Jocelyn Baines, a literary critic, "Conrad was exiled with his parents to northern Russia in 1863 following his his parents participation in the Polish independence movement". (Baines 34). His parents' health rapidly deteriorated in Russia, and after their deaths in 1868, Conrad lived in the homes of relatives, where he was often ill and received spradic schooling (35). Conrad's birth-given name was Jozef Tedor Konrad Valecz Korzeniowski ...
    Related: conrad, darkness conrad, joseph conrad, good and evil, human existence
  • Mark Twain - 620 words
    Mark Twain Samuel Langhorne Clemens is better known as Mark Twain, the distinguished novelist, short story writer, essayist, journalist, and literary critic who ranks among the great figures of American Literature. Twain was born in Florida Missouri, in 1835, To John Marshall Clemens and Jane Lampton. As a new born Twain already had moved four times westward. In 1839 the family moved again, this time eastward to Hannibal, Missouri. Hannibal was a frontier town of less than 500 residents. As small as the town was it offered valuable materials and opportunities for a young writer. Most of the residents knew Samuel well, considering they were on the lower half of the social scale, such as poor ...
    Related: mark, mark twain, twain, samuel clemens, middle west
  • Othello And Hamlet Themes - 998 words
    Othello And Hamlet Themes The plays Othello and Hamlet, written by William Shakespeare, have many similarities and differences. Two main characters Iago, of Othello, and Hamlet, of Hamlet, can be compared and contrasted through characterization. Characterization is the represent ion of characteristics or motives of a character. Both characters have different character traits which make them truly different from one another, but their ending resolutions are remarkably the same. In Othello, Iago is a very manipulative and cunning character. Iago's entire scheme begins when Cassio is given the position that Iago wanted. Iago then comes up with numerous ideas and plots to steal the position he f ...
    Related: hamlet, king hamlet, othello, othello iago, literary critic
  • Paul Laurence Dunbar - 1,190 words
    Paul Laurence Dunbar PAUL LAURENCE DUNBAR Renowned African-American poet, Paul Laurence Dunbar rose from a poor childhood in Dayton, Ohio to international acclaim as a writer and as an effective voice for equality and justice for African-Americans (Howard, Revell). He met and associated with other historical men such as Fredrick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, and his Dayton neighbors Orville and Wilbur Wright (Harvard, Columbus). Dunbar's personal story, as well as his writings, are still an inspiration to all Americans (Poupard). Dunbar was born June 27,1872 in Dayton, Ohio to Matilda and Joshua Dunbar, former slaves from Kentucky (Van Doren 296, Columbus). Their family was extremely poor ...
    Related: dunbar, laurence, laurence dunbar, paul laurence, paul laurence dunbar
  • Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Was The First Important African American Poet In American Literature And The First Poet To Write Of Bot - 950 words
    Paul Lawrence Dunbar, was the first important African American Poet in American Literature and the first poet to write of both a black and white audience in a time when efforts were being made to re-establish slavery. He was also "the first African-American poet to garner national critical acclaim"(43). During his short lifetime Dunbar became known as the "poet laureate of African Americans" (Columbus 45). Paul Lawrence Dunbar was born in Dayton, Ohio in 1872, to two freed slaves. Both of Dunbar's parents, who had been born slaves, had a love for literature. His father Joshua, had escaped slavery, moved to Canada, and returned to fight in the Civil War. It was after the war that he met and m ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american literature, lawrence, literature, poet
  • Robert Penn Warren, Born In Guthrie, Kentucky In 1905, Was One Of The Twentieth Centurys Most Eminent American Writers He Was - 997 words
    Robert Penn Warren, born in Guthrie, Kentucky in 1905, was one of the twentieth century's most eminent American writers. He was a distinguished novelist and poet, literary critic, essayist, short story writer, and coeditor of numerous textbooks. He also a founding editor of The Southern Review, a journal of literary criticism and political thought. The primary influences on Robert Warren's career as a poet were probably his Kentucky boyhood, and his relationships with his father and his maternal grandfather. As a boy, Warren spent many hours on his grandfather's farm, absorbing stories of the Civil War and the local tobacco wars between growers and wholesalers, the subject of his first novel ...
    Related: american, american literature, american poetry, american writers, century poetry, eminent, kentucky
  • Suffering Ignored - 1,051 words
    Suffering Ignored On February 21, 1907 Wystan Hugh Auden was born in York England. Auden was a poet, dramatist, and literary critic whose everyday language and conversational rhythms has had a major influence on modern poetry. Auden was initially a science major but after several years at Gresham School he realized science was not the career for his future. With the influence from Robert Medley, Auden began to write poetry. Due to this big change in Auden's life, he enrolled in Christ Church, at Oxford. Before his departure from Gresham School Auden came to recognize his homosexuality. At the beginning of Auden writing career he had an interest in Anglo-Saxon poetry. Auden's poetry in the 19 ...
    Related: influence people, stop worrying, technical writing, anguish, pieter
  • Sup Natl In Macbeth - 722 words
    Sup. Nat'l In Macbeth Supernatural Forces in Macbeth In Shakespeares Macbeth, specific scenes focus the readers attention to the suspense and involvement of the supernatural. The use of witches, apparitions and ghosts are an important element in making the play interesting. Examining certain scenes of the play, it can be determined that as supernatural occurrences develop, Macbeth reflects a darker self-image. Macbeth experiences his first strange encounter of the supernatural when he meets the three witches in act one, scene one. After learning of his prophecies to become king, Macbeth states, Glamis, and Thane of Cawdor: The greatest is behind (still to come). (1.3.117-118). Shakespeare us ...
    Related: macbeth, new jersey, literary critic, self image, signal
  • The History Of The Victorian Age - 613 words
    The History of the Victorian Age The History of the Victorian Age The Victorian era produced many eminent figures. Lytton Strachey was one of them. Born in 1880, Strachey was a British biographer and a critic who is credited of having revolutionized the art of writing biography. He opened a new era of biographical writing by adopting an irreverent attitude to the past, especially to the volumes of the Victorian biography. His book, Eminent Victorians, a wartime book composed of four miniature biographies, won him widespread recognition as a literary critic and a biographer. In this work, instead of using the conventional method of detailed chronological narration, he has carefully selected h ...
    Related: history, victorian, victorian period, victorian society, florence nightingale
  • Virginia Woolf - 1,669 words
    Virginia Woolf "Virginia Woolf - A Life of Struggle and Affliction" The literary critic Queenie Leavis, who had been born into the British lower middle class and reared three children while writing and editing and teaching, thought Virginia Woolf a preposterous representative of real women's lives: "There is no reason to suppose Mrs. Woolf would know which end of the cradle to stir." Yet no one was more aware of the price of unworldliness than Virginia Woolf. Her imaginative voyages into the waveringly lighted depths of "Mrs. Dalloway" and "To the Lighthouse" were partly owed to a freedom from the literal daily need of voyaging out - to the shop or the office or even the nursery. Her husband ...
    Related: virginia, virginia woolf, woolf, feminist literature, medical history
  • Wordsworths Use Of Nature - 1,555 words
    Wordsworth's Use Of Nature William Wordsworth was born on April 7, 1770, in Cockermouth, West Cumberland, located in the northern part of Englands Lake District. This area of England is famous for its splendid array of natural landscape. After losing his mother when he was just eight years old, Wordsworth was sent to live with Ann Tyson, who allowed Wordsworth to freely roam the beautiful countryside near Esthwaite Lake. The freedom Ann Tyson gave young Wordsworth allowed him to experience nature, and led him to a deep affinity and love for it. As critic Matthew Arnold says in his essay on Wordsworth, It is Wordsworths relationship with nature that regards him as one of the most important po ...
    Related: william wordsworth, romantic period, lyrical ballads, matthew arnold, solemn
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