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  • A Literary Critique Of C S Lewis - 1,048 words
    A Literary Critique of C. S. Lewis A Literary Critique of C. S. Lewis: The Case for Christianity, The World's Last Night and Problem with Pain I. Introduction II. Brief Biographical Information III. The Case for Christianity - Right and Wrong as a Clue to the Meaning of the Universe IV. The Problem with Pain - Divine Omnipotence V. The World's Last Night - The Efficacy of Prayer VI. Conclusion A Critique of C. S. Lewis "A Relativist said, 'The world does not exist, England does not exist, Oxford does not exist and I am confident that I do not Exist!' When Lewis was asked to reply, he stood up and said, 'How am I to talk to a man who's not there?'" - C. S. Lewis: A Biography Clive Staples Lew ...
    Related: c. s. lewis, critique, lewis, literature and language, world war i
  • A Literary Critique Of C S Lewis: The Case For Christianity, The Worlds Last Night - 1,046 words
    ... s,"If there was a controlling power outside the universe, it could not show itself to us as one of those facts inside the universe- no more than an architect of a house could actually be a wall or staircase or fireplace in that house."4 The concept of a good power or mind is misleading. When God is referred to as good, the immediate thought is a warm loving personality. Lewis referred to this good as representative of truth. The law of nature is defined by what man ought to do or as absolute truth. When one acts according to what they ought to do, the law of nature has no consideration of how painful or dangerous it might be. This good which Lewis argued for is cold and hard, without per ...
    Related: critique, free will, absolute truth, c. s. lewis, efficacy
  • Babbitt By Sinclair Lewis 18851951 - 1,685 words
    Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951) Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951) Type of Work: Social commentary Setting Zenith, a mythical Midwestern American city; 1920s Principal Characters George F. Babbitt, a middle-aged real estate agent Myra, his wife Ted, their teenage son Paul Reisling, George's buddy from college Zilla, Paul's nagging wife Tanis Judique, George's mistress Seneca Doane, a radical lawyer and George's former college friend Story Overveiw As another day began in Zenith, sleeping George Babbitt fought to ignore the morning sounds - the milk truck, the furnace-man, a dog barking - so that he could cling to the dream he was having. He had the same dream often. It involved a "f ...
    Related: babbitt, lewis, sinclair, sinclair lewis, american city
  • C S Lewis - 994 words
    C. S. Lewis C. S. Lewis, a well-known author and apologist, is best known by people of all ages for his seven volume series entitled The Chronicles of Narnia. As Lewis wrote about the land of Narnia, an imaginary world visited by children of this world, he had two obvious purposes: to entertain the readers and to suggest analogies of the Christian faith. Although some feel that his stories are violent, Lewis is successful at using fiction to open peoples hearts to accepting Christ as their Savior because he first entertains the audience with a wonderful story. Lewis talked about how he came to write the books of Narnia, saying that they "all began with a picture of a Faun carrying an umbrell ...
    Related: c. s. lewis, lewis, literary critic, new jersey, cornell
  • C S Lewis - 1,034 words
    ... ering quotes of those who support the Christianity found in The Chronicles and its use in the secular classroom. In an article found in The Horn Book Magazine, Lillian H. Smith feels Lewis is successful at entertaining children because of his strong talents as a "picturemaker" (Martin 4). Martin also demonstrates the success of presenting Christian ethics in the secular classroom, but she reminds us that due to the way the world is going, this is the most success we may receive from the books when used in the secular classroom (7). This is partially due to the fact that teachers are not allowed to talk about Christianity in the secular classroom. English professor Dr. Corbin Scott Cornel ...
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  • Chance Meeting By Martin Lewis - 1,311 words
    "Chance Meeting" By Martin Lewis 'Chance Meeting' is a dry point etching print by Martin Lewis and was created in the early 1930's. The subjects are two figures, male and female, who have happened upon each other in the setting of a public sidewalk at the entrance of a storefront. It may be a dichotomy in terms to call the piece, "Idealized Urban Realism," though Lewis' work does harmonize well with the Urban Realist movement surfacing in this period with artists such as Edward Hopper. It also has a very idealized and stylistic quality not unlike the work of artists like Roy Liechtenstein in a much later time period. At a glance, 'Chance Meeting' is a simple work intended to tell a story wit ...
    Related: lewis, martin, young woman, edward hopper, cast
  • Charles Lutwidge Dodgson Lewis Carroll - 471 words
    Charles Lutwidge Dodgson - Lewis Carroll English 265 - Modern Poetry Poet: Lewis Carroll Term Paper Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was born on the 27th of January in the year of 1832 and died on the 14th of that same month in 1898. His pseudonym, Lewis Carroll, was born on March 1st, 1856 and was destined to live forever. Most poets live out of sync with the era they exist in, but Caroll lived a particularly bizarre lifestyle. He was a mathematician as well as a poetic scholar. It is rare for someone to excel at either one individually, yet Caroll, a connoisseur of logic and art as well, was able to master both subjects. The most bizarre aspect of his lifestyle was not his versatility with math an ...
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  • Critique Of School Bells By Lewis Lapham - 1,121 words
    Critique Of School Bells By Lewis Lapham School Bells Essay I found Lewis Lapham's article "School Bells" in the August, 2000 edition of Harper's magazine to be not only convincing, but also easy to relate to and truthful. The contents of the article have far-reaching and thought-provoking implications. Much of his argument rests on the nearly indisputable belief that if we, as a nation, devoutly wished to reform or even revolutionize the educational system in place, we undoubtedly could. Factual proof of this is found throughout the history of the United States. We have made significant scientific and societal advances in the last one hundred years as evidenced by the computer, the automobi ...
    Related: critique, lewis, public school, civil rights movement, educational system
  • In Lewis Carrolls Novel Alice In Wonderland, Alice Is Curious, - 549 words
    In Lewis Carroll's novel Alice in Wonderland, Alice is curious, well-mannered, and confused while she tries to find her way out of Wonderland. Alice meets many unique and weird creatures which eventually help her escape wonderland. Alice shows that she is curious through her actions. At the beginning of the book Alice gets distracted from her boring work, and chases a white rabbit down a hole. This excerpt describes Alices curiosity, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed in her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket. When Alice is at the bottom of the hole she find a bottle labeled Drink Me, she wants to see what it tastes like, this excerpt describes ...
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  • Lewis Caroll - 1,227 words
    Lewis Caroll After hundreds of publications, films, and stage plays, some scholars have begun to fear that Alice has become "cold and monumental , like a classic tomb" say Gilbert K. Chesterton, of the novel(Gardener,1960). The Adventures of Alice In Wonderland is no longer a light, fun book of nonsense, but now, more than ever, just a required reading for most high school students. The truth is that Lewis Carroll's humorous antics are not quite as senseless as they may seem to the average, American teenager. Much of his complicated nonsense was meant only to be understood by the residents of Oxford, and others only by the three daughters of Henry George Liddle. Carroll's physical appearance ...
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  • Lewis Carroll In Wonderland - 1,556 words
    Lewis Carroll in Wonderland I. Through the writings of Lewis Carroll in the story Alice in Wonderland the difference between fantasy and reality can be seenthrough the eyes of a child. The stories created by Carroll are a combination of make believe stories made to entertain children he talked to on an almost daily basis. Seen as odd by adults in society Carroll better associated himself with children because of his stammering disability when speaking. A. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson B. Alice in Wonderland C. Impressions II. Charles Lutwidge Dodgeson A. Talents B. Pseudonym of Dodgson 1. Inspiration of Alice III. Alice in Wonderland A. Fantasy vs. Reality 1. Interpretation of Alice a. Growning-u ...
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  • Main Street By Sinclair Lewis - 456 words
    Main Street by Sinclair Lewis Annonymous For as long as I can remember, I've loved to read: short stories, fiction, nonfiction sometimes, even philosophy if nothing else were available. This term I've been given more reading assignments than I can ever remember having to deal with. This term has been extra special because we studied no less than three types of literature: short stories, poetry, and drama. While I was in high school, a short story was a book with less than three hundred pages. This term I learned that even though a short story may be only a few pages long, there are chapters of interpretation, ambiguity, and symbolism to understand. In 'The Lottery' by Shirley Jackson, I foun ...
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  • Mere Christianity By Lewis - 2,910 words
    ... ves his life. C.S. Lewis begins his book, "Mere Christianity", by introducing the Law of Right and Wrong or the Laws of Nature. This, however, arises a question. What is the Law of Nature? The Law of Nature is the known difference between right and wrong. That is, mans distinction between what is right and what is wrong. "This law was called the Law of Nature because people thought that everyone knew it and did not need to be taught it"(18). Lewis relates the law to how we treat others. We treat others the way we want to be treated and if they treat us poorly in return we become agitated and annoyed with them. He states that we become a society of excuses when something goes wrong. He go ...
    Related: c. s. lewis, christianity, lewis, mere, mere christianity
  • The Book The Lives Of A Cell: Notes Of A Biology Watcher Was Very Well Written By Lewis Thomas This Book Covered A Lot Of Ins - 341 words
    The book The Lives of a Cell: Notes of a Biology Watcher was very well written by Lewis Thomas. This book covered a lot of insects such as ants, termites, bees, wasps, and moths which I liked because insect interest me. I was surprised to learn how strong the earth actually is, in contrast with the delicate flower that we are told it is. I learned that thousands of dollars are wasted every year on medical bill that we didnt even need to go see a doctor about. I also read, that if we ever do find alien life, it might not be the little green martian we have seen so much of, it might be a microbe, a strand of nucleic acid, or a molecule of enzyme. I found out that many animal give off odors cal ...
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  • 2001: A Space Odyssey - 1,255 words
    2001: A Space Odyssey The concept of space travel has been an interest to many since the beginning of time. Today, scientists are moving at a comfortable pace to expand our vast knowledge of the universe. Many authors dreamed of the possibilities while scientists tried to bring them to reality. The book "2001: A Space Odyssey," written by Arthur C. Clarke in the 1960's, proposed ideas about advanced space travel that took place in a time period only two years from now; however, at the current rate of the space program, mankind is nowhere near the technology showed by the book. Clarke uses concepts of space travel that can still only be dreamed of today. Clarke, an author of the sixties, had ...
    Related: odyssey, outer space, space odyssey, space program, space shuttle, space technology, space travel
  • 5 Most Influential People In American History - 1,556 words
    5 Most Influential People In American History The United Sates has had a short yet complex history in its two hundred and twenty-four years. She has produced millions and millions of great individuals. These great minds have shaped what America is today. Others, however, have personally molded this magnificent nation with their own acts. John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson are the most influential builders of the United States of America. John Adams was born loyal to the English Crown but evolved into the second President of the Free World. As a lawyer, Adams emerged into politics as an opponent of the Stamp Act and was a leader in the Revolutionary gro ...
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  • 7 I Have Chosen The Character Abigail And Will Show The Impact She Had On The Witch Hunt In Salem Because Of Her Strong Leade - 529 words
    7. I have chosen the character Abigail and will show the impact she had on the witch hunt in Salem because of her strong leadership and the accusations she made towards others in Salem. Abby was a very fluensul girl in the play and the other girls looked up to her and would follow along for what ever she told them. A few examples of something that she did was she wanted to get rid of elizabeth so she used the witch hunts to here advanatege. She seen Marry Warren in court making a poppet for Elizabeth and noticed that she put the neddle in it for safe keeping. Marry gave the poppet to her and the next day Abby took a pin and stuck it in her stomach and told the gudge and jury that Elizabeth s ...
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  • A Rose, By A Vulcan Name, Would Smell As Sweet - 1,201 words
    A Rose, By A Vulcan Name, Would Smell As Sweet A Rose, By a Vulcan Name, Would Smell as Sweet. Social commentary is dangerous. In addition to risking social and political censure, the commentator must carefully convey the message. In directly addressing a problem, one risks alienating an audience before making one's point. If one indirectly approaches said problem, one may appear to lack conviction or a point. Star Trek: the Original Series takes a third path, that of allegory. Unfortunately, as the television series belongs to the science fiction genre, its social significance is often disregarded. However, upon examination, it is clear that the veiled nature of commentary in Star Trek is v ...
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  • Aaron Douglas - 1,128 words
    Aaron Douglas People may ask, what other than a tornado can come out of Kansas? Well, Aaron Douglas was born of May 26, 1899 in Topeka, Kansas. Aaron Douglas was a "Pioneering Africanist" artist who led the way in using African- oriented imagery in visual art during the Harlem Renaissance of 1919- 1929. His work has been credited as the catalyst for the genre incorporating themes in form and style that affirm the validity of the black consciousness and experience in America. His parents were Aaron and Elizabeth Douglas. In 1922, he graduated from the University of Nebraska School of Fine Arts in Lincoln. Who thought that this man would rise to meet W.E.B. Du Bois's 1921 challenge, calling fo ...
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  • Abe Lincoln - 1,352 words
    Abe Lincoln Abraham Lincolns assassination was a malevolent ending to an already bitter and spiteful event in American history, the Civil War. John Wilkes Booth and his group of co-conspirators developed plans in the late summer of 1864 to only kidnap the President and take him the Confederate capital of Richmond and hold him in return for Confederate prisoners of war. Booths group of conspirators: Samuel Arnold, Michael OLaughlen, John Surratt, Lewis Paine, George Atzerodt, David Herold, and Mary Surratt (Johns wife), made plans on March 17, 1865, to capture Lincoln, who was scheduled to see a play at a hospital in the outskirts of Washington. However, Lincoln changed plans and remained in ...
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