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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: leaves of grass

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  • Leaves Of Grass - 982 words
    Leaves Of Grass I attended one of the many presentations at the Book Fair in MDCC Wolfson Campus on Thursday 18, 199 at 7:30pm. This presentation was called Art and Literature in Argentina and it was the introduction of the new translation of Leaves of Grass (Hojas de Hierva). Leaves of Grass is a book full of inspiring poems; Walt Whitman issued the first of many editions more than 100 years ago in 1895. Many writers translated this book into many languages, especially into Spanish but its best translation was by the famous author and poet Jorge Luis Borges. Leaves of Grass is a volume of poetry in a new kind of versification because he praised the human body and glorified the senses. Walt ...
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  • Leaves Of Grass By Walt Whitman - 1,536 words
    Leaves Of Grass By Walt Whitman In the twentieth century, the name Walt Whitman has been synonymous with poetry. Whitmans most celebrated work, Leaves of Grass, was the only book he ever wrote, and he took a lifetime to write it. A large assortment of poems, it is one of the most widely criticized works in literature, and one of the most loved works as well. Whitman was unmarried and childless, and it has been noted that Leaves of Grass consumed him greatly; James E. Miller Jr. writes: "...he guided his poetic offspring through an uncertain, hesitant childhood, a lusty young manhood, and a serene old age...it is difficult to write the life of Whitman without writing instead of the life and t ...
    Related: leaves of grass, walt, walt whitman, whitman, literary criticism
  • Leaves Of Grass By Whitman - 426 words
    Leaves Of Grass By Whitman Some years ago, when a few copies of a volume called Leaves of Grass found their way into this country from America, the general verdict of those who had an opportunity of examining the book was that much of it was indescribably filthy, most of it mere incoherent rhapsody, none of it what could be termed poetry in any sense of the word, and that, unless at the hands of some enterprising Holywell Street publisher, it had no chance of the honour of an English reprint. Besides, it would be idle to deny that Walt Whitman has many attractions for minds of a certain class. He is loud, swaggering, and self-assertive, and so gets credit for strength with those who worship ...
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  • Blooming Trinity - 1,233 words
    Blooming Trinity English 1302.018 October 11, 2000 Blooming Trinity In the poem When Lilacs Last In The Dooryard Bloomd, by Walt Whitman, three important symbols are introduced. These symbols of a star, the lilac, and a bird exhibit Whitmans transcendentalism and serve as an allusion to Abraham Lincolns life and death. Whitmans poetry, through these symbols, opens a window to the prevailing social attitudes, moral beliefs, and cultural disposition of his time through his allusions to President Lincoln. To understand Whitmans poetry one must first know something about the poet himself. Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in Long Island New York. Whitman disliked the idea of becoming a carpe ...
    Related: trinity, abraham lincoln, langston hughes, ralph waldo, representing
  • Born In Boston In 1809, Edgar Poe Was Destined To Lead A Rather Somber And Brief Life, Most Of It - 1,175 words
    ... se ideas, along with those of Plato, the Neoplatonists, Asian mystics, and SWEDENBORG, strongly influenced his philosophy. Returning home (1835), he settled in Concord, Mass., which he, Margaret FULLER, THOREAU, and others made a center of TRANSCENDENTALISM. He stated the movement's main principles in Nature (1836), stressing the mystical unity of nature. A noted lecturer, Emerson called for American intellectual independence from Europe in his Phi Beta Kappa address at Harvard ("The American Scholar," 1837 [.txt-only version]). In an address at the Harvard divinity school (1838), he asserted that redemption could be found only in one's own soul and intuition. Emerson developed transcend ...
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  • Edward Weston: American Photographer - 1,147 words
    Edward Weston: American Photographer Edward Weston: American Photographer Daniel J Brophy History of Photography Term Paper Weston is, in the real sense, one of the few creative artists of today. He has recreated the matter-forms and forces of nature; he has made these forms eloquent of the fundamental unity of the work. His work illuminates mans inner journey toward perfection of the spirit. --Ansel Adams, Date Unknown Edward Weston (1886-1958) may seem like he was a confused man in trying to find his photographic goal(s). Just like many other photographers, both of his time and now, he strove to find what truly satisfied his talent and the acceptance of himself. He generated something for ...
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  • Walt Whitman - 516 words
    walt whitman A World of Politics Thesis: Walt Whitman was a man who used his thoughts on political issues concerning the Civil War within his writings because of many experiences he had encountered. Whenever ever the term political writing comes up, most people would think of Walt Whitman. Walt Whitman was one of the most popular political writers of all times. Nearly everyone agrees that Walt Whiman is America 's greatest poet (Unger 331). Whitman's ideas and attitudes were chiefly those of the Romantic Movement (Foerster 719). Some of Whitman's most popular writing were Leaves of Grass, A Song of Myself, and Drum-Taps. Leaves of Grass is a poem mostly concerning Whitman's childhood and mem ...
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  • Walt Whitman - 1,185 words
    Walt Whitman Walt Whitman Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819, in West Hills, Long Island, New York. He was the second of six children. From 1825-1830, he attended public school in Brooklyn. After his years of education, Walt Whitman experimented with many different jobs. From 1836-1838, Whitman taught at several schools in Long Island. After teaching, Walt Whitman returned to printing and editing in New York. During this time he edited many papers such as the Aurora (daily newspaper), Evening Tattler, Brooklyn Weekly Freeman, Brooklyn Daily Eagle and the Brooklyn Times. In addition to editing, he also wrote for the Long Island Star. From 1850-1854, Whitman owned and operated a printing of ...
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  • Walt Whitman - 1,765 words
    Walt Whitman In parting with traditional poetic formalities, Walt Whitman alleviated a burden that impeded his ability to achieve full poetic expression. To Whitman, the strict boundaries that formal meter, structure, and rhyme imposed set limits on his stylistic freedom. This is not to say that these limits prevented Whitman from conveying his themes. Rather, they presented a contradiction to which Whitman refused to conform. In Whitmans eyes, to meet these formal guidelines one would also have to sacrifice the ability to express qualities and passion of living men. Thus, Whitman contested traditional poetic protocol because it added a layer of superficiality that concerned itself with crea ...
    Related: walt, walt whitman, whitman, human spirit, american literature
  • Walter Whitman - 1,695 words
    Walter Whitman Walter Whitman Through the history of the United States there have been a countless numbers of poets. With them came an equal number of writing styles. Certainly one of the most unique poets to write life's story through his own view of the world and with the ambition to do it was Walter Whitman. Greatly criticized by many readers of his work, Whitman was not a man to be deterred. Soon he would show the world that he had a voice, and that it spoke with a poet's words. Afoot and lighthearted I take to the open road, Healthy, free, the world before me, the long brown path before me leading wherever I choose. Thus Whitman began his "Song of the Open Road". This paper will attempt ...
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  • Whitman - 1,129 words
    Whitman Walt Whitman was looked upon as the forerunner of 20th Century poetry, praising democracy, and becoming a proclaimed poet of American democracy. He was known as the "Son of Long Island," and he loved his country and everything about it. (Current, Williams, Freidel- page 292-293). Whitman lived during the time of the Civil War; a fact that increased his patriotism. Whitman was considered one of the most important American Poets of the 19th Century. (Encyclopedia of World Biography- page 249). He influenced the direction of 20th Century poets such as Erza Pound, William Carlos Williams, Carlos Sandberg, and Allen Ginsberg. Whitman praised democracy and spoke of the flesh as well as the ...
    Related: walt whitman, whitman, abraham lincoln, school teacher, poet
  • Whitman 1855 - 1,670 words
    Whitman 1855 What was Walt doing at this time? Late in 1854, Whitman was working in carpentry. He is assumed to have started his writings for what would later be known, and published as Leaves of Grass in late 1854 or early 1855. One of his brothers once commented that Walt would get an idea while working, write it down, then take the rest of the day off. How did Walt get his book published? Allen contends that Walt probably sought out a commercial publisher to take his book at first, though there is no mention or proof of this. However, Whitman took his book to the Rome brothers, James and Thomas, who had a printing shop on the corner of Fulton and Cranberry. These two men were friends of W ...
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