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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: labor organization

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  • Child Labor - 1,523 words
    Child Labor Child Labor In the past few years, a great deal of attention has been drawn to the global problem of child labor. Virtually everyone is guilty of participating in this abusive practice through the purchase of goods made in across the globe, usually in poor, developing nations. This issue has been around for a great length of time but has come to the forefront recently because of reports that link well known American companies like Wal-Mart and Nike to the exploitation of children. Prior to this media attention, many Americans and other people in developed nation were blind to the reality of the oppressive conditions that are reality to many. Child Labor has been in existence in d ...
    Related: child labor, fair labor, fair labor standards act, international labor, labor, labor organization, labor practices
  • Child Labor - 1,502 words
    Child Labor Introduction Child labor is a serious problem in many parts of the world, especially in developing countries. Labor is defined as physical or mental work especially of the hard or fatiguing kind. (Websters Dictionary) Child labor usually means work that is done by children under the age of 15, which restricts or damages their physical, emotional, intellectual, social, or spiritual growth as children. The International Labor organization estimates that there are 250 million children worldwide, between the ages of 5 and 14, who are now working. Africa and Asia together account for over 90 percent of total child employment (Faraaz Siddiqi) Child labor is especially common in the rur ...
    Related: child labor, child labour, international labor, labor, labor issues, labor organization
  • Early Strikes Of The American Labor Movement - 1,596 words
    Early Strikes Of The American Labor Movement EARLY STRIKES OF THE LABOR MOVEMENT In the mid-nineteenth century and early twentieth century, industry in America was growing at an alarming rate. This growth brought about basic changes in the way things were produced and in the lives of those who produced them. It was the Civil War that first started to change industrial landscape of the nation. "More than a million dollars a day were spent on weapons, ammunition, machinery, clothing, boots, shoes, [and] canned goods" (Meltzer, 3). The high demand for so many different items brought bigger, newer and more efficient factories. The factories were producing cheaper products than the small, indepen ...
    Related: american, american labor, labor, labor force, labor movement, labor organization, pullman strike
  • Immigration Problem - 1,986 words
    Immigration Problem The world has gone through a revolution and it has changed a lot. We have cut the death rates around the world with modern medicine and new farming methods. For example, we sprayed to destroy mosquitoes in Sri Lanka in the 1950s. In one year, the average life of everyone in Sri Lanka was extended by eight years because the number of people dying from malaria suddenly declined. This was a great human achievement. But we cut the death rate without cutting the birth rate. Now population is soaring. There were about one billion people living in the world when the Statue of Liberty was built. There are 4.5 billion today. World population is growing at an enormous rate. The wor ...
    Related: american immigration, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration problem, legal immigration
  • Is A Womans Place In The Home - 1,769 words
    Is A Woman's Place In The Home? Is A Woman's Place in the Home? Glynis R. Hay Rickards Is Woman's Place Is In The Home? I glanced at my watch; it was 3:30 p.m. I logged off the computer picked up my car keys and signaled to my boss. He knows the meaning of that familiar signal. It means I am dashing off to pick up my kids (ages 10 and 13) from school. After picking them up I will take them home and leave them to perform the familiar routine that they have been practicing for years. First they will have their bath, then take the microwave able containers with the specific day labeled from the fridge, placed it in the microwave oven, have their dinner, complete their assignments then head to t ...
    Related: economic growth, glass ceiling, care center, fulfillment, worthwhile
  • Labor Unions And Nursing - 1,455 words
    Labor Unions And Nursing The American Labor movement in the United States has a history dating back to the beginnings of the industrial revolution. Its existence is due to poor working conditions and exploitation during the beginning of that time. Labor unions have had a long history of using their most powerful weapon, strikes, to fight their battles. Even today, with the diminishing numbers of union members, strikes appear in the news sporadically. History of Labor Unions The first strike is thought to be by printers in Philadelphia in 1786 (Maidment, 1997). Working conditions, pay and benefits were so poor, leaders in the southern United States used them to justify slavery. Their contenti ...
    Related: american labor, international union, labor, labor market, labor movement, labor organization, labor relations
  • Spanishamerican War - 2,058 words
    Spanish/American War Spanish America PART ONE THE CONQUEST AND COLONIZATION OF THE SOUTHWEST 1 Legacy of hate: The conquest of Mexico's northwest A. The invasion of Texas-Not all the Anglo-Americans favored the conflict. Eugene C. Barker states that the immediate cause of the war was " the overthrow of the nominal republic by Santa Anna and the substitution of centralized oligarchy" which allegedly would have centralized Mexican control. Texas history is a mixture of selected fact and generalized myth. Historians admit that smugglers were upset with Mexico's enforcement of her import laws. B. The invasion of Mexico- In the mid-1840s, Mexico was again the target. The expansion and capitalist ...
    Related: work experience, doing business, mexican american, mobility, commerce
  • Stake Of Labor And Wto - 1,695 words
    Stake Of Labor And WTO Stake of Labor in the WTO Seven years of trade negotiations at last gave birth to the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 1995, the U.S. labor movement was one of its leading skeptics. A world trade organization, labor supporters argued, would only accelerate the headlong rush to laissez-faire by dismantling national regulations. It would overwhelm attempts by nations to defend living standards and the ability of unions to fight for wages and health and safety lawsand it would make it harder for nations to defend the rights of workers to join unions. Labor lobbied hard against the WTO. But now, ironically, the WTO could become a critical venue for advancing workers' righ ...
    Related: child labor, international labor, labor, labor issues, labor laws, labor market, labor movement
  • Stake Of Labor And Wto - 1,698 words
    ... and International Monetary Fund in global importance, because it has a dispute settlement mechanism with enforcement powers. In the basic architecture of the current trading regime, three minimalist GATT principles continue to operate through the WTO. The first is the famous most-favored-nation status (MFN): Products traded among GATT members must receive the best terms that exist in any bilateral trading agreement. The necessity for an MFN clause arises because countries have bilateral trading agreements. So if the United States imposes, say, a 10 percent tariff on product X from country Y, it must use that same tariff on all other members of the earlier GATT and the present WTO. Today ...
    Related: american labor, child labor, international labor, labor, labor movement, labor organization, labor practices
  • The Hatch Act Of 1939 - 1,110 words
    The Hatch Act Of 1939 The Hatch Act of 1939 Under Hatch Act of 1939, federal employees, employees of the District of Columbia (D.C.) government, and certain state and local government employees faced significant restrictions on their ability to participate in political activities and placing ceilings on campaign expenditures. The act is named for its author, Senator Carl Atwood Hatch (1889-1963) of New Mexico. (There was an earlier Hatch Act (1887), named for Representative William Henry Hatch (1833-96) of Missouri, concerned the study of scientific agriculture.) The Hatch Act of 1939 passed following several big corruption cases involving the burgeoning post-New Deal bureaucracy, and was ai ...
    Related: hatch, new deal, william henry, political organizations, designated
  • The Industrial Revolution Was Dawning In The United States At - 2,420 words
    The Industrial Revolution was dawning in the United States. At Lowell, Massachusetts, the construction of a big cotton mill began in 1821. It was the first of several that would be built there in the next 10 years. The machinery to spin and weave cotton into cloth would be driven by water power. All that the factory owners needed was a dependable supply of labor to tend the machines. As most jobs in cotton factories required neither great strength nor special skills, the owners thought women could do the work as well as or better than men. In addition, they were more compliant. The New England region was home to many young, single farm girls who might be recruited. But would stern New Englan ...
    Related: industrial revolution, industrial workers, living standards, samuel gompers, municipal
  • The Industrial Revolution Was Dawning In The United States At - 2,336 words
    ... day-to-day welfare of their members and should not become involved in politics. He also was convinced that socialism would not succeed in the United States but that practical demands for higher wages and fewer working hours could achieve the goal of a better life for working people. This was known as "bread and butter" unionism. There was one outstanding exception to the pragmatic "bread and butter" approach to unionism which characterized most of American labor. This was the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), a revolutionary labor union launched in Chicago in 1905 under the leadership of Eugene V. Debs. The IWW the overthrow of capitalism through strikes, boycotts and sabotage. Par ...
    Related: communist revolution, industrial revolution, industrial workers, industrial workers of the world iww, states congress, united states congress
  • The League Of Nations - 935 words
    The League of Nations The League of Nations and It's Impact on World Peace Through my studies and research I have come to the following conclusion about the League of Nations: despite all of President Woodrow Wilson's efforts, the League was doomed to fail. I feel this was so for many reasons, some of which I hope to convey in the following report. From the day when Congress voted on the Fourteen Points, it was obvious that the League had a very slim chance of being passed in Congress, and without all of the World powers, the League had little chance of surviving. On November 11, 1918 an armistice was declared in Europe. Wilson saw the opportunity to form an international organization of pea ...
    Related: league, league of nations, united nations, international justice, national socialist
  • Unionism - 1,979 words
    Unionism Michael Paul 099 66 3949 History 316z Trade unionism, industrial unionism, and socialism were the main forms of organized labor in the late nineteenth century early twentieth century, yet rarely did these shifting currents flow in complementary ways that might appeal to the vast majority of struggling workers. The three most important formal organizations were the American Federation of Labor (AFL), the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) and the Socialist Party of America. All three of these organizations had there own strengths but the many weaknesses and divisions combined with outside influences caused the retardation of their radical, left wing ideas. The American Federation ...
    Related: unionism, labor unions, chicago press, political platform, canada
  • Wagner Act - 1,839 words
    Wagner Act Wagner Act What was the need for the Wagner Act? Before the WA, rights of workers were protected by the National Industry Recovery Act of 1933. In 1935, the Supreme Court declared the NIRA unconstitutional. By doing so, workers lost their rights to join unions of their choice and to bargain collectively. In 1935 the unemployment rate was over 21% and more than 50% lived in poverty as we measure it today. Large employers were said to have immense control over their workers who had at best, one single place to work. Those workers were paid less than their economic contribution measured by their productivity. Before the WA, the federal government had refrained from supporting collect ...
    Related: wagner, labor law, trade union, labor-management relations, indemnity
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