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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: king philip

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  • A Summary Of Portugese History In Ceylon 15061631 - 1,200 words
    A summary of Portugese History in Ceylon (1506-1631) A Summary of Portugese History in Ceylon (1506-1631) The first Portuguese visiting Ceylon was Dom Lourenço de Almeida in 1505 or 1506. Accidentally, after a storm, adverse winds drove him to the island's coast near Galle. In the last months of the years 1505 or 1506 Dom Lourenço's fleet anchored off Colombo. A memorial of this first landing was erected on a boulder overlooking the Bay of Colombo.The Portuguese called it a "Padrao" and a cross above the Royal Arms of Portugal surmounted it. This landmark was still seen in 1920 (now?) bearing the inexplicable date of 1501.This first expedition admittedly built a wooden chapel a ...
    Related: ceylon, history, summary, king philip, santa barbara
  • Alexander The Great - 618 words
    Alexander The Great Who is Great? In history there are few people who can be termed Great and even fewer who deserve to be called so. Alexander, the son of King Phillip of the Macedonians, was one of these truly Great people. He not merely ruled the largest know empire, was declared a God, lead his troops in battle, and conquered foreign cities, his first being at the age of sixteen, but he did it all within a thirteen year time period. Not only did he do all of this, but also it was done within thirteen years. When Alexander became the new King of Macedonia, many believed him to be to young to rule. They felt that he didnt have the experience needed to be their new leader. They had no way o ...
    Related: alexander, alexander the great, first great, ninth edition, king phillip
  • Alexander The Great - 1,372 words
    Alexander The Great Alexander the Great was a man with no equal in History. He was one of the most important forces known to man. Alexander the Great then crossed the Hellespoint, which is now called the Dardanelles and, as head of a Greek army undertook the war on Persia that his father had been planning. The march he had begun was to be one of the greatest in history. Alexander was one of the biggest influenced on people of all time and one of the most powerful personalities. He really molded people into acting the correct way. He brought people together and showed them how to live better. He defiantly changed the lives of many. Alexander the Great was born in 356 BC Philip his father was ...
    Related: alexander, alexander the great, great alexander, king alexander, asia minor
  • Alexander The Great - 510 words
    Alexander The Great I. Born a. 356BC b. In Pella the Capital of Macedonia II. Parents a. King Philip the II 1. later divorced Olympus 2. Alexander ran away after Divorce 337B.C. b. Olympus a Princess of Epiru III. Youth and Teenage Years a. Aristotle was his Tutor 1. He taught him about Greek art, philosophy, poetry, and science. 2. loved homer b. brought up as a crown prince 1. When his father divorced his mom he ran away until his father was assassinated IV. He is ascended to the throne, June 336 BC a. Disposed of all conspirators and domestic enemies by having them executed b. Soon as he ascended he found himself threatened by rebellion V. Began War Against Persia a. 35,000 men went to wa ...
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  • Aristotle B 384 D 322 Bc, Was A Greek Philosopher, Logician, - 1,556 words
    Aristotle (b. 384 - d. 322 BC), was a Greek philosopher, logician, and scientist. Along with his teacher Plato, Aristotle is generally regarded as one of the most influential ancient thinkers in a number of philosophical fields, including political theory. Aristotle was born in Stagira in northern Greece, and his father was a court physician to the king of Macedon. As a young man he studied in Plato's Academy in Athens. After Plato's death he left Athens to conduct philosophical and biological research in Asia Minor and Lesbos, and he was then invited by King Philip II of Macedon to tutor his young son, Alexander the Great. Soon after Alexander succeeded his father, consolidated the conquest ...
    Related: aristotle, classical greek, greek, greek philosopher, human beings
  • Aristotle On Rhetoric - 1,210 words
    Aristotle On Rhetoric ristotle (384-322 B.C.) was a Greek philosopher, educator, and scientist. He was able to combine the thoughts of Socrates and Plato to create his own ideas and definition of rhetoric. He wrote influential works such as Rhetoric and Organon, which presented these new ideas and theories on rhetoric. Much of what is Western thought today evolved from Aristotle's theories and experiments on rhetoric. Aristotle's Life Aristotle was born in 384 B.C., in Northern Greece. His father was a physician to the king of Macedonia, Amyntas II. Amyntas II was the grandfather of Alexander the Great. When Aristotle was still a boy, both of his parents died; so he was raised by a guardian ...
    Related: aristotle, rhetoric, lecture notes, alexander the great, interpretation
  • Aristotle On Rhetoric - 1,207 words
    ... scientist. While at Plato's school, Aristotle developed a personal affection for Plato and learned many things from his instructor. However, he ultimately rejected Plato's fundamental concepts and developed his own theories on matters of logic, ethics, metaphysics, as well as rhetoric. After the death of Plato in 347 B.C., Aristotle moved in with a former pupil of Plato, Hermeias. During his three year stay, he married princess Pithias, Hermeias's daughter. The couple had two children: a son named Nicomachus as well as a daughter. In 342 B.C Aristotle was invited to direct the education of young prince Alexander at the court of Philip II of Macedonia. During this time he continued his s ...
    Related: aristotle, rhetoric, famous works, the prince, pupil
  • Arts Of The Contact Zone By Pratt - 1,104 words
    Arts Of The Contact Zone By Pratt In "Arts of the Contact Zone," Mary Louise Pratt introduces a term very unfamiliar to many people. This term, autoethnography, means the way in which subordinate peoples present themselves in ways that their dominants have represented them. Therefore, autoethnography is not self-representation, but a collaboration of mixed ideas and values form both the dominant and subordinate cultures. They are meant to address the speaker's own community as well as the conqueror's. Pratt provides many examples of autoethnography throughout her piece, including two texts by Guaman Poma and her son, Manuel. Although very different in setting, ideas, and time periods, they a ...
    Related: arts, pratt, zone, the intended, grammar school
  • Controversies Between Church And State - 407 words
    Controversies Between Church And State Controversies Between Church and State During the Middle Ages, church and state leaders had many battles. Some who were involved were Holy Roman Emperor Heinrich IV and Pope Gregory VIII; King II and Archbishop Thomas Becket; King Philip IV and Pope Boniface VIII. Their situations were all related by the fact that they were all controversies between an emperor or king and the Catholic church. The Holy Roman Emperor Heinrich (Henry) IV and Pope Gregory VIIIs struggle was centered on by investiture. Henry invested many bishops at his own will even though Gregory had banned investiture by laity. Henry felt his investiture of bishops was necessary to the co ...
    Related: catholic church, church and state, higher power, pope boniface, gregory
  • Crusades - 1,040 words
    Crusades In the Middle Ages, Christians considered Palestine the Holy Land because it was where Jesus had lived and taught. The Arabs had conquered Palestine in the 600s. Most Arabs were Muslims, but they usually tolerated other religions. Jews and Christians who paid their taxes and observed other regulations were free to live in Palestine and practice their own religion. The Arab rulers didnt usually interfere with Christian pilgrims visiting Palestine, and European traders could generally do business there. During the 1000s the Seljuk Turks, people from central Asia who had adopted the Muslim faith, conquered Palestine and attacked Asia Minor, which was part of the Byzantine Empire. When ...
    Related: crusades, first crusade, second crusade, philip augustus, holy roman emperor
  • Francis Drake - 1,689 words
    Francis Drake Francis Drake was an experienced and daring seafarer. Among many adventures, the'famous voyage', his successful circumnavigation of the world between 1577 and 1580 ensured that he would be one of the best remembered figures of Tudor England. In his own lifetime, he was thought of with mixed feelings, both at home and abroad. Some English people regarded him as a hero, but he was distrusted by others, who saw him as having risen 'above his station'. Although he was feared and hated by the Spanish, he was also regarded by some with secret admiration. What was England like at the time of Drake? For most of Drake's life, Queen Elizabeth I ruled the country. It was a time when Engla ...
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  • Mary Rowlandson - 481 words
    Mary Rowlandson Mary Rowlandson wrote a narrative about hardships she faced during her captivity, in a journal. Despite her suffering she thanked God for her life and his mercy. Rowlandson wrote during the colonial period and is an example of a puritan writer for many reasons. As a typical Puritan writer would, Rowlandson chose to write about God, religious beliefs, and her hardships. After the death of her child Rowlandson thanked God for, "preserving me". This statement clearly reveals her faith in fate and God's will. In the narrative she also describes her daily life as a capture. Rowlandson writes that she was "calling for my pay," after she made a shirt for one of the Indians. After th ...
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  • Mary, Nickname: Bloodymary, 1st Person - 344 words
    Mary, Nickname: Bloodymary, 1St Person Mary the first was born on FEB. 18. 1516 at GREENWICH PALACE. I WAS THE DAUGHTER OF HENRY THE 8 AND CATHRINE THE FIRST OF ARGON. I WAS A GOOD STUDENT AND ACCOMPLISHEND LINGUIST. I LEARNED LATIN, FRENCH, SPANISH, ITALIAN, AND GREEK. I STUDIED ASTRONOMY, NATURAL SCIENCE, AND MATH. I PLAYED MUSIC, DANCED, AND EMBROIRED. MY FATHER WANTED ME TO MARRY MY HALF BROTHER BUT I DIDNT BECAUSE HE WOULD HAVE HAD TO NILLUFY HIS MARRIGAGE WITH MY MOTHER. I didnt like my fathers second wife b/c I FELT SHE WAS TRYING TO TAKE THE PLACE OF MY MOTHER. I WAS FORCED OUT OF MY HOUSE, AND SENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER ELIZABETH. B/C OF THIS I LOST MY TITLE OF PRINCESS, AND WAS DE ...
    Related: second wife, catholic church, natural science, govt, latin
  • Medieval Weapons - 1,026 words
    Medieval Weapons Medieval Weapons were (are) very dangerous. They Can kill, puncture, wound, hurt, or anything else. All weapons From the Middle Ages were looked upon as frightening and crucial Tools to kill. From a small dagger to a large cannon; all weapons Would kill, no doubt about it. A lot, in fact most of the weapons were used for siege and Defense against castles. Castles were the most integral part of the Middle Ages. They held the king, the servants and anyone else Important. If you wanted land or money, a castle was the perfect Place to hit. Movable Towers were just one thing used to lay siege on These castles. Not necessarily a weapon itself, it held Weapons...knights and peasant ...
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  • Ponce De Leon And The Early Explorationof Florida - 1,649 words
    Ponce de Leon and the Early Exploration of Florida Juan Ponce de Leon was born in 1460, in Tierra de Campos Paleia, in Leon, Spain (Ponce, 1996). He came from a noble family and entered the royal household as a page for Pedro Nunez de Guzman, at the Court of Aragon. Later, young Ponce de Leon would become a solider for Spain and fight in the battles to drive the Moors from Granada (Blassingame, 1991). In 1493, Leon sailed with Christopher Columbus on his second voyage to America (Ponce, 1996). He was a member of the forces that enslaved the Indians in Hispaniola.This was the European and Spanish way. Few explores would look upon the natives they encountered as anything more than talking anim ...
    Related: florida, florida keys, leon, ponce de leon, men and women
  • Queen Elizabeth I - 801 words
    Queen Elizabeth I Queen Elizabeth was born in Greenwich Palace on September 7, 1533. She died on March 24, 1603, of natural causes. Her father was Henry VII. His second wife, Anne Boleyn was Elizabeth's mother. King Henry wanted a son, but received a daughter, instead, from his second wife. Before Elizabeth's third birthday, Henry had her mother beheaded in charges of adultery and treason. Elizabeth was brought up in a separate household at Hatfield (not known). King Henry's third wife gave birth to a son. This boy was named Edward. Edward was declared first in line for King Henry's throne, while Mary (Daughter of Henry's first wife) was declared second, and Elizabeth was declared third and ...
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  • Race Relations In The New World - 1,483 words
    Race Relations In The New World Race Relations in the New World The British colonies in North America were not societies that valued or expected equality. They conquered Native American land without any payment for it and they used African Americans as slaves. By the end of the 17th century and the beginning of the 18th century, the standard norm for the British included vicious warfare with the Native Americans and enslavement of the African Americans. These practices became the standard norm as a result of carelessness and perhaps fear of change on the part of the British. Early British settlements in North America established first contact between the British and the Native Americans. Alm ...
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  • Richard I Lionheart - 1,132 words
    Richard I - LionHeart  Itty-bitty details One of the most prominent figures of the Third Crusade was Richard I, nicknamed Lionhearted. He was born on September 8th, 1157 and he later died on April 6, 1199 (Britannica, Vol 10, p.43). He was the third son of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitane (Dictionary of the Middle Ages, Vol 10, p.383). He eventually acquired the nickname LionHeart (which in French, would be Coeur de Lion) due to his incredible amount of courage (Britannica, Vol 10, p.43). There are actually two variations of his nickname; "lionheart" and "lionhearted" (Dictionary of the Middle Ages, Vol 10, p.383). In 1168 he became the Duke of Aquitane and then, in 1172, the Duke of Poiti ...
    Related: king henry, the duke, henry vi, castles, navarre
  • Roman Empire - 705 words
    Roman Empire The Roman Empire was a strong hold over the Mediterranean for many years. Being the goal of most all world leaders, the Romans wanted land along with their power. They set their eyes on the valuable lands around them and the Mediterranean world as well as parts of Northern Europe and Asia. The Roman civilization and culture was much influenced by the Phonetians and Greeks. Later, the Romans were in control of these lands and their people. Three of their prize provinces held at much value to them were Thrace, Macedonia, Greece. These three lands were all located in the same area, providing a throughway to Rome for trade routes from China and the Middle east. Thrace, being on the ...
    Related: empire, roman, roman civilization, roman empire, eastern orthodox
  • Spain - 407 words
    Spain SPAIN Spain is located in southwest Europe. Spains official name is Reino de Espana, which means, Kingdom of Spain. The capitol of Spain is Madrid, which is the largest populated city in the country. Barcelona is the second largest city in Spain, which also is greatly populated. Official language spoken is Castilian Spanish, others Catalan, Galician, and Basque. The majority of Spanish religion is 97% Roman Catholicism, others i.e. Protestantism Islam & Judaism. Their currency is Spanish Peseta. A historical overview of Spain, happened in 1588, when Spain attempted to invade England; generally known as the Spanish Armada. King Philip led the Spaniards. Unsuccessfully, Spain was defeat ...
    Related: spain, living conditions, spanish armada, santa claus, protestantism
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