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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: jazz

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  • Breakthroughs In American Jazz - 618 words
    Breakthroughs In American Jazz Breakthroughs in American Jazz The backdrop was New Orleans in the late 19th century, a growing port city with a diverse population of African Americans, whites, displaced French settlers, and immigrants from the West Indies and South America. This hodgepodge of cultures mixed European influenced popular music, such as ragtime, with tradition African music creating the hybrid musical style known as jazz. Jazz, bold and beautiful, in its purest sense demands high instrumentation mastery, creativity, and improvisation combined with low rehearsal and repetition. Unlike opera or symphony music, jazz dates back a little more than a century ago and finds all of its m ...
    Related: american, american jazz, american life, american music, free jazz, jazz, jazz music
  • Ch Paul Whiteman A Classically Trained Violinist And Violist Who Adored Jazz But Lacked The Gift To Emulate The Uni - 1,055 words
    Ch.12 Paul Whiteman(1890-1967)= a classically trained violinist and violist who adored jazz but lacked the gift to emulate the uninhibited improvisations of the jazz musicians he admired, formed a dance band in the early twenties that played jazzy arrangements of popular and even classical melodies. Blues = a black vocal folk music, began as vocal (largely instrumental). Classical blues = based on 3 lines of text. Wild wame dont do the blues. Urban Blues = blues pieces written for publication and professional performance. W.C. Handy = father of the blues. Boggie woogie = arrived from blues (a popular piano style with the form and harmony of the blues, but a faster tempo and a dance beat. Jel ...
    Related: gift, jazz, jazz music, orleans jazz, whiteman
  • Ch Paul Whiteman A Classically Trained Violinist And Violist Who Adored Jazz But Lacked The Gift To Emulate The Uni - 1,031 words
    ... = a declamatory setting of a text, with rhythms and inflections related to those of speech. Aria = a songlike setting, musically expressive, accompanied by the orchestra. Da capo = from the beginning a three-part design. The composer writes the first section and a contrasting middle section of a da capo aria, and the performer repeats the first section with embellishments. Chorus = a large ensemble, with several voices on each part. Libretto = the words of an opera or other dramatic vocal work. Overture = in music theater, an introductory instrumental piece. George gershwin = ansombels. Ch. 18. Drone = a single tone, sounded continuously or repeated. Jimmie Rodgers(1897-1933) = from Mis ...
    Related: gift, jazz, whiteman, american music, elton john
  • Great Gatsby And Jazz Times - 627 words
    Great Gatsby And Jazz Times In his Jazz Age novel, The Great Gatsby, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald portrays society as snobs who bask in the wealth of the age. The novel was written in the heart of the Jazz Age and depicts it flawlessly. After World War I, many companies that had been making war supplies returned to creating their unique products. (ELCO) "The Jazz Age was a time of prosperity, but also a time of many downfalls. It was an era of change ... a time when people began to do what they wanted to do instead of following social norms." (ELCO) This caused industry to "boom", and the economy accelerated with frightening speed. Some people became very wealthy, and in Fitzgerald's novel, ...
    Related: gatsby, great gatsby, jazz, the great gatsby, francis scott key
  • Jazz - 691 words
    Jazz As the United States entered the 1920's it was not as unified as one might think. Not one, but two societies existed. The Black society, whose ancestors had been oppressed throughout the ages, and the White society, the oppressors of these men and women. After emancipation the Whites no longer needed the Blacks, but were forced to live with them. The Blacks despised the Whites, but even so they became more like them in every way. Even though these two races had grown so similar over the past century and a half, they were still greatly diversified. One aspect of this great diversity was the difference in music trends. The White society was still in love with the European classical music. ...
    Related: jazz, jazz music, men and women, oxford university press, oppressed
  • Jazz - 1,388 words
    Jazz When it comes to music, most people don't say they like it. People say they like heavy metal, pop, rhythm and blues, or any other type of music, since they have their own preference to what type of music they like, not just enjoying the broad area of music. One of those types of music which many enjoy is jazz. Actually right now jazz is really big and popular in Europe, and is rising in its popularity in the USA through its many forms. Jazz does have many forms, so many that some people wouldn't consider just saying they like jazz, they would say they enjoyed bebop, ragtime, blues, or other types of jazz. Jazz has survived longer than many types of music, and it has always influenced th ...
    Related: free jazz, jazz, orleans jazz, kansas city, louis armstrong
  • Jazz - 1,397 words
    ... used a lot more in jazz combos. Bebop totally redefined the way to improvise in a song, and it is full of creative and unique musical ideas, also called "licks". Famous people such as the saxophonist Charlie Parker, the trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, and the drummer Max Roach created bebop during the 40s and the Postwar Decades, which was definitely a big leap for jazz. This style of jazz is less restricted, and improvisation involved longer phrases, more choruses, and more emotions. Modal jazz, also called free jazz, has no rules at all. It was created during the late 50s through the 70s. Improvisation has ultimate freedom and so does the songs. A famous trumpeter named Miles Davis helped ...
    Related: free jazz, jazz, miles davis, john coltrane, interpretation
  • Jazz Music The Roots Of Our Everyday Life - 648 words
    Jazz Music- The Roots Of Our Everyday Life What is Jazz? According to the dictionary, jazz is defined as, A kind of syncopated, highly rhythmic music originated by Southern blacks in the late 19th century (Jazz 232). But, everyone should at least agree that jazz is the mother of all music, and is referred to as the only art form originating in the United States (History 101 2). America was home to immigrants from all over Europe and beyond who wished to build a new life, or just needed to escape from the old. These people, often thought of as second-class, brought their culture with them to America, expressed it musically, and changed the music world as we know it today. Most early jazz was ...
    Related: everyday life, jazz, jazz history, jazz music, jazz singer, music, orleans jazz
  • Rise Of Jazz - 1,016 words
    Rise Of Jazz The Rise of Jazz Throughout this paper I will take you through some of the different styles and eras of jazz. Such styles as be-bop, cool jazz, dixeland, swing, and fusion emerged define jazz music. Along with these different styles there were important eras that molded jazz music, such eras as the golden ages, and the swing era. Jazz is a kind of music that has often been called the only art form to originate in the United States. The history of jazz began in the late 1800s. The music grew from a combination of influences, including black American music, African rhythms, Americans band tradition and instruments, and European harmonies and forms. Much of the best jazz is still w ...
    Related: jazz, jazz history, jazz music, late 1800s, world book
  • The Developement Of Free Jazz - 1,037 words
    The developement of Free Jazz The Development of Free Jazz All music has to develop into something new and by the late 1950's jazz was ready for a slight turn. A musical style called free jazz emerged with slight differences that has influenced most improvised music to this day. Some people despised this music's lack of set form. They found it difficult to listen to because of the missing order and lack of pre-planed notes. Others embraced the new music and it's emphasis on random feelings of emotion. For the men that developed free jazz it was a journey to find the "ultimate" expression in music. There is no set definition for free jazz. "In free jazz, musicians improvise freely without adh ...
    Related: developement, free jazz, jazz, jazz music, dizzy gillespie
  • The Flapper Era Was The Time Of The Worship Of Youth Pandorasboxflapper Flappers Were Women Of The Jazz Age They Had Measurem - 886 words
    The flapper era was the time of the worship of youth (pandorasbox/flapper). Flappers were women of the Jazz Age. They had measurements of pre-adolescent boys, with no waistline, no bust, and no butt. Flappers had short hair worn no longer than chin length, called bobs. Their hair was often dyed and waved into flat, head-hugging curls and accessorized with wide, soft headbands. It was a new and most original style for women. A lot of make-up was worn by flappers that they even put on in public which was once unheard of and considered something done only by actresses and whores. Flappers wore short, straight dresses often covered with beads and fringes, and they were usually worn without panty ...
    Related: jazz, worship, works cited, charlie chaplin, magazine
  • The Prolific Trumpeter Who Became A World Ambassador For Jazz, Louis Armstrong Learned To Blow On A Bugle In Reform School Wh - 526 words
    The prolific trumpeter who became a world ambassador for jazz, Louis Armstrong learned to blow on a bugle in reform school when he was 13. His intuitive genius for improvisation changed the course of jazz, but after the 1940s mugging dominated his performances and he had his greatest success as a pop singer. Louis Daniel Armstrong popularly known as Satchmo and Pops was born on July 4, 1900, in New Orleans, the birthplace of American jazz. His father, Willie, was a day laborer in a turpentine plant, and his mother, Mayann (Mary Ann), worked chiefly as a domestic. His grandparents had been slaves. Dippermouth (his original nickname) picked up small change by singing and dancing with other str ...
    Related: ambassador, armstrong, blow, louis, louis armstrong, prolific, reform
  • Understanding Jazz - 1,548 words
    Understanding Jazz Understanding Jazz A mellow vibration lingers throughout a smoke-filled room, as eloquent music escapes the callused fingers of relaxed musicians. The tempo speeds up and grows into a fusion of spontaneous and uneven chords, exploding with rhythmic soul and life. The sound of jazz embraces the room. Jazz is primarily a dazzling, spellbinding, introspective beauty. The musician and the listener find they can derive meaning from the music. The music exists first, and its meaning is defined later. When a jazz musician is improvising, he is spontaneously composing, and at that moment his music is completely subjective. He must imagine the future in his music. He cannot transce ...
    Related: jazz, african american music, white america, the bluest eye, chicago
  • 65279the Establishment In The 1960s - 1,012 words
    The Establishment in the 1960's The nineteen sixties were times of great change. Many people went from moderates to radicals because of the environment around them. That environment was called the establishment. It included all of the events going on in the nineteen sixties. Some of the main events taking place were the Vietnam War, the government, the Democratic National Convention and the culture (*). Many protested things that they did not believe in or thought was wrong (*). There were many things that made the radical's different from the moderates. They were the music they listened to and the clothes they wore. Most obviously was the way they acted. In the summer of 1967, society and r ...
    Related: establishment, foreign policy, military action, rock concert, pants
  • A Reflection On Paul Hindemith - 1,231 words
    A Reflection On Paul Hindemith Paul Hindemith was revolutionary and a musical genius. Many people who lived around the same time saw him as nothing more than an untalented noisemaker. Granted, these people didnt have all of the various forms of music that we have today, but untalented would not be a word I would use to describe Paul Hindemith. He helped begin the last great change in classical music from the Romantic Era, which was very tonal and diatonic, to 20th Century Modern Music, which is extremely atonal. Diatonic means within in the key. In other words, everything sounds nice and pretty. There are no weird noises, no funny pitches. Atonal itself is defined as the avoidance of the tra ...
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  • African American Community - 3,076 words
    African American Community By 1945, nearly everyone in the African American community had heard gospel music (2). At this time, gospel music was a sacred folk music with origins in field hollers, work songs, slave songs, Baptist lining hymns, and Negro spirituals. These songs that influenced gospel music were adapted and reworked into expressions of praise and thanks of the community. Although the harmonies were similar to those of the blues or hymns in that they shared the same simplicity, the rhythm was much different. The rhythms often times had the music with its unique accents, the speech, walk, and laughter which brought along with it synchronized movements. (2) The gospel piano style ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, american life
  • African American Community - 3,040 words
    ... stood that his name would not appear in the program credits or advertising. For twenty weeks, the Mahalia Jackson Show ran on television for a half-hour each episode. Beginning in September 1954, the show did not last very long. Mahalias show featured her singing traditional gospels and spirituals with a few miscellaneous songs but the show was missing a major component. (2) The show was in need of a sponsor and began to go out of business. The show went from thirty minutes airtime to ten minutes and eventually ended in February 1955. This was not the end of Mahalia's television appearances however. The TV station, WBBM-TV of Chicago asked Mahalia to be a guest on their program, "In Town ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, race relations
  • African American Women And Music - 1,702 words
    African American Women and Music The purpose of this report was for me to research and explore the connection between African American women and music. Since prior to the slave decades, music has been an integral part of African American society, and served as a form of social, economic, and emotional support in African American communities in the past and present. This paper will cover three different types of secular music that emerged during the slave days, through the civil war, reconstruction, and depression periods. They are blues, jazz, and gospel music. Each of these forms of music are still in existence today. In addition to exploring the history of each of these genres of music, th ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american jazz, american society, american women, black women
  • Alanis Morissette - 957 words
    Alanis Morissette The energetic and talented new singer on the radio is not what you would call laid-back. She is in no way a "here today, gone tomorrow" singer. I believe, she has and will revolutionize the entertianment industry. The daughter of Alan and Georgia Morissette, Alanis, an Ottawa native, is one of three children in the family. She has an older brother named Chad and a twin brother named Wade. Although the name Alanis is Greek itself, Alanis Morissette has no Greek background whatsoever. As it turns out, Alan Morissette wanted his daughter to have a female version of his name, but he wasn't particularly fond of the name Alanna. One day, by chance, he spotted the name "Alanis" in ...
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  • Although Musicians Had Been Recording Fiddle Tunes Known As Old Time Music At That Time In The - 4,440 words
    Although musicians had been recording fiddle tunes (known as Old Time Music at that time) in the southern Appalachians for several years, It wasn't until August 1, 1927 in Bristol, Tennessee, that Country Music really began. There, on that day, Ralph Peer signed Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family to recording contracts for Victor Records. These two recording acts set the tone for those to follow - Rodgers with his unique singing style and the Carters with their extensive recordings of old-time music. Jimmie Rodgers Known as the "Father of Country Music," James Charles Rodgers was born in Meridian, Mississippi on September 8, 1897. Always in ill health, he became a railroad hand, until ill ...
    Related: country music, music, music hall, recording, rock music
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