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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: immigration reform

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  • Immigration Reform - 477 words
    Immigration Reform James Fenimore Cooper was born in Burlington, New Jersey on September 15, 1789. He was the eleventh of twelve children born to William and Elizabeth Cooper. When James was one year old the family moved to the frontier, and his father established the settlement of Cooperstown at the head of the Susquehanna River.Cooper attended a private preparatory school at Albany, New York, and was then admitted to Yale in 1803. He was expelled during his junior year because of a prank. His family allowed him to join the navy as a midshipman, but he soon found that more discipline was present in the Navy than at Yale. In 1810 Cooper took a furlough, and never returned to active duty. Coo ...
    Related: immigration, immigration reform, reform, walter scott, american life
  • Cultural Diversity In The Workplace - 1,376 words
    ... anded. Today, diversity is a serious corporate initiative that is seen as helping those at a disadvantage. Through their commitment and involvement of diversity issues, Xerox was awarded the prestigious Malcolm Baldridge quality award in 1989 for its three decade campaign to hire and promote women as well as minorities (Managing diversity: Lessons from the private sector, AOL Electric Library). The company has been a leader in the development of diversity initiatives which include programs designed to improve employee motivation, and teamwork through helping people to understand differences in gender and race as well as disabilities. Although some of these programs go back over thirty ye ...
    Related: cultural diversity, diversity, diversity in the workplace, diversity training, managing diversity, workplace
  • Illegal Immigration And The Economy - 1,295 words
    Illegal Immigration And The Economy Illegal Immigration and the Economy Illegal immigration has become one of the key political issues of the 1990s, especially in border states such as California. The Bureau of the Census estimates that there are now 4 million illegal aliens living in the United States and that about 300,000 more settle permanently each year. Four million illegal immigrants is undeniably a large number of people, but it is far below the invading army of 8 million 10 million aliens regularly reported in the media and by anti-immigrant lobbyists. Illegal aliens constitute only about 1.5 percent of the 260 million people living in the United States. Myopic and xenophobic Americ ...
    Related: economy, global economy, illegal, illegal aliens, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy
  • Immigration - 1,424 words
    Immigration The first immigrants to the territory now the United States were from Western Europe. The first great migration began early in the 19th century when large numbers of Europeans left their homelands to escape the economic hardships resulting from the transformation of industry by the factory system and the simultaneous shift from small-scale to large-scale farming. At the same time, conflict, political oppression, and religious persecution caused a great many Europeans to seek freedom and security in the U.S. The century following 1820 may be divided into three periods of immigration to the U.S. During the first period, from 1820 to 1860, most of the immigrants came from Great Brit ...
    Related: illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy, immigration reform, religious persecution
  • Immigration - 1,688 words
    Immigration To US For many, immigration to the United States during the late 19th to early 20th century would be a new beginning to a prosperous life. However there were many acts and laws past to limit the influx of immigrants, do to prejudice, such as the Chinese Exclusion Act. Later on into the 20th century there would be laws repealing the older immigration laws and acts making it possible for many more foreigners to immigrate to the United States. Even with the new acts and laws that banned the older ones, no one can just walk right in and become a citizen. One must go through several examinations and tests before he or she can earn their citizenship. The Immigration Act of March 3, 189 ...
    Related: immigration, immigration laws, immigration reform, asia pacific, chinese exclusion act
  • Immigration - 791 words
    Immigration Immigraton in the U.S. While immigration has played an important role in the building and formation of America, new federal laws have resulted in mass immigration. Throughout history, Congress has enacted laws and has had to amend them to control the flow of both legal and illegal migration to the United States. In 1948, legislation was first enacted in an effort to control the number of applicants fleeing persecution; it permitted 205,000 refugees to enter the United States. In 1952, Congress set in place major regulations setting parameters and quotas mostly for the eastern hemisphere and leaving the western hemisphere unrestricted. In 1953, congress was again faced with having ...
    Related: immigration, immigration reform, legal immigration, mass immigration, criminal justice
  • Immigration Problem In The Us - 1,221 words
    Immigration Problem in the U.S. The first move stopping immigration decided by Congress was a law in 1862 restricting American vessels to transport Chinese immigrants to the U.S. The Alien Contract Labor Laws of 1885, 1887, 1888, and 1891 restricted the immigration to the U.S. of people entering the country to work under contracts made before their arrival. Alien skilled laborers, under these laws, were allowed to enter the U.S. to work in new industries. By this time anti-immigrant felling rose with the flood of immigrants and in this period the anti-Catholic, anti-foreign political party the Know-Nothings, was already born. After World War I a marked increase in racism and the growth of is ...
    Related: illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy, immigration problem, immigration reform
  • Immigration Problem In The Us - 1,111 words
    ... he problem. Faster citizens processing, helping illegals country's economy such as NAFTA which is already in affect. Some suggest tamper proof residency cards, computerize the I.N.S., increases the number of boarder patrol agents, and build a wall around the U.S. and problem countries. There has been many suggestions made in dealing with this problem. The Gallegly bill is one of them. If ever completed by House-Senate conferees, is likely to include several conditions already adopted in similar form by both chambers. As passed by the House and Senate, the bill would: Increase the number of border patrol agents by 1,000 each year between 1996 and 2000, roughly doubling the force to reach ...
    Related: american immigration, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy, immigration problem, immigration reform, legal immigration
  • Immigration: Should America Close The Golden Door - 1,654 words
    ... In the end a young immigrant population may very well save such programs as social security by increasing the number of workers in the market (Mont 18). These are all economic benefits, but the diversity the United States gains is a priceless commodity that future generations of Americans will need to succeed in a growing international job market. The Cost of Immigration The United States immigration policy does not allow people to immigrate if they are expected to be dependant on public services. Yet in 1993 approximately 12% of the 5.9 million recipients of Supplemental Security Income benefits were immigrants, even though they only account for about 5% of the population (Mont 15). Sta ...
    Related: america, golden, working poor, make money, searching
  • Overpopulation - 1,208 words
    Overpopulation How many times have you been sitting in traffic with your engine running and on the right you see a factory letting off pollutants into the air? Well every time you do this and the company does this you and them are polluting are air and water, and leading to the destruction of the Bay Area. Unless we the people of the Bay Area and the factories do something to improve the pollution we are letting off then the Bay Area is in serious danger of losing the beauty of city. When is an area overpopulated? When its population cant be maintained without rapidly depleting nonrenewable resources (or converting renewable resources into nonrenewable ones) and without degrading the capacit ...
    Related: overpopulation, immigration reform, works cited, environmental protection, attain
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