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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: immigration

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  • Australian Immigration Law - 1,059 words
    Australian - Immigration Law Australia is similar to America in many ways. They are both industrialized nations, they were both settled by the British, and they both have multi-ethnic societies. However, the two countries have vastly different immigration laws. In America, we will let almost anyone move here and work. An American immigrant can be from (almost) any country, race, or religion. Australia on the other hand, has had a much stricter policy determining who can move to their country. Australia's immigration law is ethnocentric in nature because it excludes anyone who is not of Anglo-Saxon descent. The policy is in the best interest for the British settlers, rather than in the best i ...
    Related: australian, australian government, immigration, immigration laws, immigration policy
  • Canadas Immigration From 18521990 - 608 words
    Canada's Immigration From 1852-1990 Canada's Immigration From 1852-1990 In 1852 many of Canada's immigrants were from Europe countries but many of these were being lost to the United states. This meant that the province of Canada was mostly French Canadians, this began the immigration promotion program in 1850s. In the 1840s the main problem was lack of control over the immigrants now the problem was getting immigrant particularly British ones to start small farms. Over the next 30 years John A. MacDonald did little to attract new immigrants to Canada. In about 1879 a new immigration law was passed that was designed to keep out paupers and destitutes. This would be the start to weed out the ...
    Related: immigration, canadian government, world war i, pearl harbour, minister
  • Controlling Immigration To The Us - 958 words
    Controlling Immigration to the U.S. With the many different groups of people coming to this country in search of a better life, we should cut back on who we should allow to have citizenship. There are thousands of immigrants coming to the U.S. every day. A lot of these immigrants are illegal aliens coming to the U.S. to find jobs. Whenever we catch illegals crossing our borders, we should send them right back and that would be the end of the story. Instead we are bringing them to camps to wait until the government finds out what to do with them. With so many immigrants coming over everyday, the U.S. lets people out of these camps and let them into our society so we can fit the new people who ...
    Related: controlling, immigration, main problem, state department, romano
  • Economics Of Immigration - 1,228 words
    Economics Of Immigration From the origin of the United States, immigration has been crucial for the economic advancement and expansion of the nation. The US truly is a melting pot of many cultures and ideas, and it has benefited greatly from its diversity. However, with a much-reduced demand for unskilled or low-skilled workers, US policy must adapt so that it can better maximize the net economic benefits of immigration. While this probably does not include a universal drop in the number of legal immigrants, it would include the screening of applicants in such a way that preference is given to more economically beneficial candidates. It would also include making families totally responsible ...
    Related: economic benefits, economics, immigration, immigration policy, legal immigration
  • Economics Of Immigration - 1,216 words
    ... free-rider problem applies to the situation of illegal immigration since these immigrants make use of public goods while not paying income taxes. One major problem of illegal immigration involves the fact that illegal immigrants do not spread out evenly across the nation. They concentrate in certain areas, and the destination states that they choose, like California, pay a heavy toll. U.S. households, in general, end up paying an enormous amount of money because of illegal aliens. A study has found that illegal immigrants drain about 2 billion dollars a year for incarceration, schooling, and Medicaid from destination states such as Texas, California, and Florida. In California for examp ...
    Related: economics, illegal immigration, immigration, legal immigration, national review
  • Ethical Issues In Us Immigration Policies - 1,136 words
    Ethical Issues In U.S. Immigration Policies The sun seems unrelenting as it beats down on the two families huddled together in a rickety makeshift boat. The rafters have been floating in the open sea for what seems to them like years. Their food and water supplies have run out and the littlest ones cry out of hunger. But the keep going. Because they know that once their feet touch the land of opportunity their prayers will be answered. Finally, their raft makes it to the ankle-deep waters and they are only a few short steps away from dry land and freedom. As quickly as the wave of relief and happiness rushes over the rafters, so does it disappear. The Coast Guard is there and telling them th ...
    Related: ethical, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration laws, immigration policy, immigration problem
  • Ethical Issues In Us Immigration Policies - 1,086 words
    ... e by the then 82 year-old humanitarian Katherine Dunham. Also, according to the article, an outcry erupted from U.S. Catholic bishops who said it was morally irresponsible and morally questionable (America, 1992, p.1). The article also quotes the Catholic Archbishop Edward A. McCarthy who said, It is only natural that the refugees experience should spawn well-founded suspicions that the treatment received by Haitians is the result of institutional racism. Only 55 out of 9,000 Haitians are granted political asylum, while there is no publicly recorded case of any one of some 10,000 predominantly white Cuban boat people being denied admission (America, 1992, p.1). Another author argues that ...
    Related: ethical, ethical treatment, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration laws, immigration policy, social issues
  • Experiencing Immigration - 1,492 words
    Experiencing Immigration The United States has been notorious for welcoming peoples from all over the world onto its lands in order to facilitate the growth of a diverse nation and generations of families have traveled to America in search of creating lives more fulfilling than those they had escaped. During the years of the late 1800s and early 1900s, the United States allowed the highest rates of immigration in it's history with groups from a number of different countries sought an escape from the economical, political, and religious hardships their own nations bequeathed. This massive influx of such a myriad of ethnicities irreversibly changed the evolution of the newly formed United Stat ...
    Related: experiencing, immigration, different countries, religious persecution, lecture
  • Experiencing Immigration - 1,478 words
    ... ed to practice Jewish religion, many cities erected synagogues and other houses of worship. On New York's East Side alone, 500 Jewish houses of worship were built between 1880 and 1915. (American Identity Explorer, CD-ROM) The Educational Alliance was formed to aid in the transition by offering citizenship classes to adults, cooking and sewing classes, and facilities for young Jewish children. Its aim was to "Americanize and modernize the newcomers and aid in their adjustment. (American Identity Explorer, CD-ROM) Other groups similar to the Alliance included the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (H.I.A.S), The Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society, and the Hebrew Free Loan Society. (American Ide ...
    Related: experiencing, immigration, living conditions, east european, wages
  • Fluctuating Immigration Policy And The Economy - 1,956 words
    Fluctuating Immigration Policy And The Economy During the various decades of 1920 to 1960, immigration policy toward Mexicans was influenced by America's economic status at each decade. During this period there was much fluctuation in attitudes and policies toward immigration. America saw immigration policy go from an almost invisible border in the 1920's to massive military-like roundups of immigrants in the 1950's. During the 1920's while the Immigration act of 1924 was all but halting European and Asian immigration, thousands of Mexicans were allowed to cross the border without any trouble from the new anti-immigration legislation so that Mexicans could work seasonally in the fields. When ...
    Related: american immigration, asian immigration, economy, immigration, immigration policy
  • German Immigration To Midwest - 1,195 words
    German Immigration To Midwest The day I left home, my mother came with me to the railroad station.When we said goodbye, she said it was just like seeing me go into my casket, I never saw her again. So is the story of Julia B. from Germany and many others who left their life and love for a chance of happiness in a new country. This is the story of the German immigrants in 1880-1930 who risked everything on a dream of better things. What caused the German immigration to Ameica between 1870-1930? In this paper I'll answer that question plus: what caused the movement, what happined to them when they arrived, and how did they adapt. I'll also tell some of the more gritty stuff by using intimate a ...
    Related: german, immigration, midwest, minimum wage, york city
  • Illegal Immigration And The Economy - 1,295 words
    Illegal Immigration And The Economy Illegal Immigration and the Economy Illegal immigration has become one of the key political issues of the 1990s, especially in border states such as California. The Bureau of the Census estimates that there are now 4 million illegal aliens living in the United States and that about 300,000 more settle permanently each year. Four million illegal immigrants is undeniably a large number of people, but it is far below the invading army of 8 million 10 million aliens regularly reported in the media and by anti-immigrant lobbyists. Illegal aliens constitute only about 1.5 percent of the 260 million people living in the United States. Myopic and xenophobic Americ ...
    Related: economy, global economy, illegal, illegal aliens, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy
  • Immigration - 648 words
    Immigration People have been immigrating to the United States for hundreds of years. Here they find food, shelter, relief from persecution, and a chance at a life of their own. Immigrants flood our gates from all over the world to be a part of the land of the free and the home of the brave. With more immigrants coming in daily, documented and undocumented, the United States needs to restrict the amount of immigrants coming across the borders. Legal and documented immigrants make up only eight percent of the population as of 1990, so it cannot really be said that America is being overrun with immigrants (Cole 99). But current assessments of the number of undocumented immigrants is somewhere b ...
    Related: immigration, national security, justice system, civil war, drastic
  • Immigration - 1,424 words
    Immigration The first immigrants to the territory now the United States were from Western Europe. The first great migration began early in the 19th century when large numbers of Europeans left their homelands to escape the economic hardships resulting from the transformation of industry by the factory system and the simultaneous shift from small-scale to large-scale farming. At the same time, conflict, political oppression, and religious persecution caused a great many Europeans to seek freedom and security in the U.S. The century following 1820 may be divided into three periods of immigration to the U.S. During the first period, from 1820 to 1860, most of the immigrants came from Great Brit ...
    Related: illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy, immigration reform, religious persecution
  • Immigration - 693 words
    Immigration The second wave of immigrants to come to the United States came in from Southern or Eastern Europe. These immigrants came to the United States seeking better economic opportunities for their families. The economy of the United States was driven by the culture that resided in the area. In the Seattle area, the farming, ranching, logging and fishing industries drove the economy. This was mainly due to the huge growth of Oregon and Washington by settlers coming in from the European countries. The mining market of San Francisco also grew during this time because of the willingness of the immigrants to pursue hard-working, heavy labor jobs. The Hispanic population was primarily respon ...
    Related: immigration, catholic religion, ethnic background, san francisco, prejudice
  • Immigration - 1,103 words
    Immigration The Canadian Immigration Policy and the Racial Discrimination it Induced The laissez faire approach to immigration that Canada had inherited over its lifetime began to fade away in 1884. British Columbia had become very concerned with the number of single male Chinese that had emigrated to the province since the 1860's when the American gold fields dried up. Thus, the provincial government took political action over the next year to finally impose a head tax of $50, on each Chinese immigrant who flocked to the region. In addition, Clifford Sifton, a struggling young lawyer from Winnipeg and the youngest member of the Cabinet of Sir Wilfrid Laurier, was obsessed by a dream of prom ...
    Related: immigration, immigration policy, canadian history, laissez faire, peril
  • Immigration - 991 words
    ... than that. A common belief is that aliens fulfill many of the least desirable jobs. However, most experts agree that in todays economy, there is no shortage of Americans competing for many of these same jobs. Actually, many Americans already work in these low-paying jobs. For example: the poor black woman, who works as a seamstress, Her boss asked her to train a new employee, an illegal immigrant. As soon as she finished training her new charge, she was fired. Her position, of course, went to the illegal immigrant, who was willing to work for less pay, and under deplorable working conditions. This is one example of how illegal workers depress wages, and slow, stall or prevent unionizati ...
    Related: illegal immigration, immigration, legal immigration, social services, orange county
  • Immigration - 325 words
    Immigration What could be more captivating than an oasis in a desert with green foliage, cool fresh water, and succulent fruits? An oasis is a paradise to a fatigued, dehydrated, and hungry person who must survive in the desert. The United States is the oasis, the paradise to immigrants who live in other countries in undesirable conditions. The preferred land where shelter, water, and food are plentiful. Unfortunately, not everyone can live in paradise. A limited number of immigrants should be allowed into the United States with consideration towards the current population, employment, and an imposed immigration tax. Overcrowding will destroy a paradise. The population growth must be monitor ...
    Related: immigration, population growth, illegal aliens, overcrowding, citizenship
  • Immigration - 1,688 words
    Immigration To US For many, immigration to the United States during the late 19th to early 20th century would be a new beginning to a prosperous life. However there were many acts and laws past to limit the influx of immigrants, do to prejudice, such as the Chinese Exclusion Act. Later on into the 20th century there would be laws repealing the older immigration laws and acts making it possible for many more foreigners to immigrate to the United States. Even with the new acts and laws that banned the older ones, no one can just walk right in and become a citizen. One must go through several examinations and tests before he or she can earn their citizenship. The Immigration Act of March 3, 189 ...
    Related: immigration, immigration laws, immigration reform, asia pacific, chinese exclusion act
  • Immigration - 367 words
    Immigration subject = history title = Immigration Immigration Early immigration to Canada was generated by a network of emigration agents who were salesman who advertised to Canadas attractions to prospected immigrants. They targeted wealthy farmers, agricultural laborers and female domestics, preferably from Great Britain, the United States and Northern Europe. Canadas first immigration legislation, the Immigration Act of 1869 reflected the laissez-faire philosophy of the time by not saying which classes of immigrants should be admitted but , merely that the "governor" could prohibit the landing of pauper or destitute immigrants at any Canadian port. The Chinese, who were arriving in large ...
    Related: chinese immigration, immigration, world war 1, northern europe, restriction
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