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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: illicit drug

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  • Buckley Jr - 2,713 words
    1. WM. F. BUCKLEY JR. Last summer WFB was asked by the New York Bar Association to make a statement to the panel of lawyers considering the drug question. He made the following statement: We are speaking of a plague that consumes an estimated $75 billion per year of public money, exacts an estimated $70 billion a year from consumers, is responsible for nearly 50 per cent of the million Americans who are today in jail, occupies an estimated 50 per cent of the trial time of our judiciary, and takes the time of 400,000 policemen--yet a plague for which no cure is at hand, nor in prospect. Perhaps you, ladies and gentlemen of the Bar, will understand it if I chronicle my own itinerary on the sub ...
    Related: buckley, illegal drug, medical care, federal government, princeton
  • A Grave Decision - 961 words
    A Grave Decision A Grave Decision I come to you today not as a politician looking to say the right things or as an ex drug users looking to lecture you on the disastrous effects of drug use. But I do come to you today as a terribly concerned citizen of this great nation. As you are probably are aware of our government is pondering the idea and is leaning toward legalizing such illicit drugs as marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. There are those in this nation on both sides of the spectrum in this great debate. Some believe that the government should not be able to control what we put in our bodies and others like myself believe that the legalization of street drugs could have irreversible reperc ...
    Related: grave, great debate, criminal acts, drug abuse, prohibition
  • Aids - 1,178 words
    Aids For an epidemic that would explode to claim hundreds of thousands of lives, AIDS surfaced very quietly in the United States, with a small notice on June 4, 1981 in a weekly newsletter published by the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, alerting doctors to five unusual cases of pneumonia that had been diagnosed in Los Angeles residents over the previous few months. All the patients were homosexual men who had come down with PCP (Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia), a lung infection usually seen only severely malnourished children or adults undergoing intensive chemotherapy. But until they got sick the California men were well nourished, vigorous adults, whose immune systems should have ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, aids research, high blood pressure, blood cells
  • Cocaine - 811 words
    Cocaine Cocaine is one of the worst drugs on the streets today. It has destroyed millions of lives and will hurt many more in the years to come. The Partnership for a Drug-Free America is a group that is concerned. They created a web site (located at http://www.drugfreeamerica.org.cocaine.html) that gives straight information on cocaine and every other known illicit drug. This information is invaluable to parents. With an enemy like cocaine people need all the information that they can get. The web site explains every thing about Cocaine. Cocaine is distributed in two main forms. Powder cocaine is a white crystalline substance. It is usually snorted through the nose, or in can be mixed with ...
    Related: cocaine, cocaine addiction, support groups, enforcement administration, nose
  • Drug Legalization In America - 796 words
    Drug Legalization In America The issues surrounding drug legalization are complicated and sensitive. Each year drug use kills about 14,000 Americans and costs taxpayers approximately $70 billion. Drug-related illnesses and crime costs an estimated $67 billion per year. Drug use also influences worker productivity as seventy-one percent of all illicit drug users are eighteen and older and employed. Also impacted is public safety. A 1993, study from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration indicated that eighteen percent of 2,000 deaths from seven states had drugs, other than alcohol, in their systems when they died. Ironically, some citizens still support the idea of drug legalizati ...
    Related: america, drug enforcement, drug legalization, drug offenders, drug policy, drug treatment, illicit drug
  • Drug Testin In The Workplace - 1,397 words
    ... on or probable cause can also lead to the absence of Equal protection under the law, the Fourteenth Amendment (Holtorf, 135). The Fourteenth Amendment was cited as protection against selection of a group of athletes for testing by the National Collegiate Athletic Association without demonstrating a likelihood that drug use was prevalent in that population (Holtorf, 136). Drug tests today are considerably weak. Mistakes and errors swarm the vast business of drug testing. Clinical laboratories are not experienced with the special requirements for specimen collection, analysis, storage, documentation, transport, and handling (McBay, 33B). Often times, simple mistakes such as mislabeling or ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug administration, drug test, drug testing, drug treatment, food and drug administration, illicit drug
  • Drug Testing - 1,601 words
    Drug Testing Drug testing is a laboratory procedure that looks for evidence of drug consumption by analyzing urine, blood, and hair samples. If tested, you must provide a sample in front of an observer to make sure that it is not tampered with. Samples are then sent to a laboratory for analysis, after which the employer is notified of the results (Wodell 1). Exactly who should be subject to the new trend of mandatory drug tests, is the big question being raised among businesses, schools, athletes and federal government employees. Businesses feel that random drug testing of their employees will create higher productivity, save on health care costs, improve employee turnover, prevent less acci ...
    Related: drug and alcohol abuse, drug testing, illicit drug, testing, pope john paul
  • Drug Testing - 1,395 words
    ... obable cause can also lead to the absence of Equal protection under the law, the Fourteenth Amendment (Holtorf, 135). "The Fourteenth Amendment was cited as protection against selection of a group of athletes for testing by the National Collegiate Athletic Association without demonstrating a likelihood that drug use was prevalent in that population" (Holtorf, 136). Drug tests today are considerably weak. Mistakes and errors swarm the vast business of drug testing. "Clinical laboratories are not experienced with the special requirements for specimen collection, analysis, storage, documentation, transport, and handling" (McBay, 33B). Often times, simple mistakes such as mislabeling or repo ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug administration, drug test, drug testing, drug treatment, food and drug administration, illicit drug
  • Drugs And Alcohol - 1,454 words
    Drugs And Alcohol One of the biggest problems people cope with today is the addiction of drugs and alcohol. The effects of taking these drugs are dangerous: domestic violence, crimes, accidents, sexual assault or becoming infected with HIV/AIDS. Different studies of domestic violence show a big involvement of high quantities of alcohol and other drugs. These increase the level of aggression. Alcoholism and child abuse, including incest, seem tightly intertwined as well. Parents, being under alcohol influence, abuse their children in a bestial way. The most important thing in this statement is that not only the abusers tend to be heavy drinkers, but the children abused will also become drinke ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol and drugs, drugs, drugs and alcohol, illicit drug
  • Drugs Prohibition - 1,639 words
    Drugs Prohibition Under the United States Constitution the federal government is charged with the responsibilities to protect our individual, as well as collective, rights to life and liberty. Often times this charge leads the various branches of the federal government to create, implement, and enforce policy that is designed to protect society from itself. Noble in its ambition the result although not apparent initially, sometimes does more to hinder the rights of the citizens it is attempting to protect, and/or the cost of doing so becomes a higher price than that of the cost that is being avoided. In this case it is necessary to re-evaluate the situation and explore any alternatives that ...
    Related: drug enforcement, drug enforcement agency, drug free america, drug prohibition, drug war, drugs, illicit drug
  • Drugs, Crime And Prohibition - 1,645 words
    Drugs, Crime And Prohibition Drugs, Crime and Prohibition Do drugs really cause crime, or is it our governments way of controlling the communities? Many people blame drugs for every problem in our society, but is it the true evil in our society? No one person can answer that question. There are only opinions and supposed theories on this issue. We have been taught over the years that drugs were bad and that they only affected the poor and less fortunate, and turned them into crazy criminals, but this isn't true to any extent. The laws controlling and prohibiting drugs are the true culprit. Would our crime levels decline if drugs were legalized to some extent, or would we just increase the de ...
    Related: crime, drugs and crime, prohibition, twenty-first century, human beings
  • Drugs, Crime And Prohibition - 1,624 words
    ... upposed decline in illicit drug use, Anslinger started to push for even stiffer penalties. Instead of approving a new bill, the American Bar Association created a committee that was in charge of investigating the Harrison Act and the first nationwide investigation of illicit drugs. Arising from this investigation was the Narcotic Control Act, which was the most severe antidrug legislation put into affect(3). The NCA doubled the lengthy sentences of the Boggs Act, and added the death penalty in some cases. These laws also failed in extinguishing the drug epidemic. By now, most states specified that marijuana and heroin penalties should be identical, and consequently marijuana penalties we ...
    Related: crime, crime control, prohibition, violent crime, substance abuse
  • Is Legalization A Realistic Alternative To The War On Drugs - 2,299 words
    ... use of the effects of their use, they would continue to engage in stealing and prostitution to pay for drugs and would continue to subject their families and friends to abuse. (Lynch and Blotner 139-144) While there have not been any narcotic legalization experiments in the United States, international experiments support Lynch and Blotner in their claim that legalization would not lead to a reduction in crime. The aforementioned failed experiments in Switzerland and the Netherlands are evidence of the effects legalization would have on crime. The Netherlands became the most crime-prone country in Europe as a result of their experiment, and the Zurich crime rate soared to an all time hig ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug legalization, drug problem, drugs, illegal drug, illegal drugs, illicit drug
  • Legalization Of Marijuana - 1,180 words
    ... g kids has increased 78 percent in the last four years alone". With drug use by young people increasing, we must not send a mixed message to our youth about the dangers of marijuana. The recent proposals for legalization and the medical usage laws are sending messages to the American children that it is "ok" to smoke pot. And it simply is not. Our nations goals must be to reduce, not promote the use of illicit drugs by our children. Marijuana is the first step that children take into the dark world of drug abuse. It acts as a gateway to more serious problems. The idea is that cocaine and heroin users don't just start out with cocaine and heroin. They start with drugs like marijuana that ...
    Related: drug legalization, legalization, legalize marijuana, legalizing marijuana, marijuana, marijuana illegal, marijuana prohibition
  • Legalize Marijuana - 1,214 words
    Legalize Marijuana The legalization of marijuana will reduce crime, narcotic drug use, and create a utopian society. Marijuana's effect on society is greatly over exaggerated in that marijuana acts as a scapegoat for many of society's problems. Marijuana is blamed today for being a gateway drug; this means that consumption of marijuana will lead to use of narcotic drugs, this claim has never been proven, the only grounds for it is that marijuana is a more widespread and more sampled drug. Furthermore, the legalization of marijuana would create potential tax revenue that would flow from a regulated market in marijuana. Marijuana grows throughout temperate regions, with more potent varieties p ...
    Related: legalize, legalize marijuana, marijuana, drug abuse, harvard medical school
  • Marijuana As Medicine - 1,154 words
    ... on surveys of randomly selected cancer patients, they would rather smoke marijuana then be subjected to chemotherapy (Grinspoon 39). Chemotherapy patients also suffer when taking oral medication that accompanies the chemotherapy treatment. . When marijuana is taken with these ordinarily painful medications, it has been known to suppress and even eliminate the side effects. This allows the patients to sustain the treatment. It also helps them physically to expedite the healing process. Cancer will consume the weakened patient. However, a strong patient can achieve remission. AIDS is the second most deadly disease that affects the world population. One of the main problems with combating ...
    Related: legalizing marijuana, marijuana, medicinal marijuana, medicine, united states supreme court
  • Marijuana Cannabus - 859 words
    Marijuana (Cannabus) Marijuana (Cannabis) Cannabis sativa, the hemp plant, grows wild throughout most of the tropic and temperate regions of the world. Prior to the advent of synthetic fibers, the cannabis plant was cultivated for the tough fiber of its stem. In the United Stated, cannabis is legitimately grown only for scientific research. In fact, since 1980, the United States has been the only country where cannabis is licitly cultivated for scientific research. Cannabis contains chemicals called cannabinoids that are unique to the cannabis plant. Among the cannabinoids synthesized by the plant are: cannabinol, cannabidiol, cannabinolidic acids, cannabigerol, cannabichromene, and several ...
    Related: marijuana, scientific research, regions of the world, reproductive system, illusion
  • Marijuana For Medical Use - 1,449 words
    Marijuana For Medical Use Marijuana for Medical Use For many years the United States government has prohibited some drugs, such as marijuana, from being sold in the marketplace. Yet, even with prohibition, marijuana use has only decreased minimally. Because of its illegality, only the bad aspects of marijuana use have been made known. However, there are many positive aspects of marijuana legalization, including its application concerning medical cures. As of today, in most of the states, marijuana is classified as an illegal drug. However, due to its proven medicinal purposes, the drug should be made available for sick people to use. Marijuana has been used for multiple purposes prior to the ...
    Related: legalizing marijuana, marijuana, marijuana legalization, medical purposes, high tech
  • Medical Marijuana - 1,260 words
    Medical Marijuana One of the most controversial issues in the United States is over medical marijuana. Many experiments test the validity of the drug as a medicine, and results of these experiments receive much praise but also some critique. The DEA and the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) are battling over the issue. The underlying matter that cannot be ignored is that marijuana proves to be a useful medication for many patients, especially those with wasting diseases such as AIDS and cancer. In 1996 California passed Proposition 215, which allowed the use of medical marijuana (4444). Since then, six other states have made medical marijuana legal; Alaska, Arizo ...
    Related: marijuana, marijuana laws, medical college, medical marijuana, medical use of marijuana
  • Medical Marijuana - 508 words
    Medical Marijuana On November 5, 1996, Californians voiced their honest opinion. Californians voted yes on a very controversial proposition - proposition 215. This law allows doctors to prescribe marijuana to patients with diseases that have severe symptoms. For example, cancer patients that undergo chemo-therapy and suffer from severe nausea and aching can benefit from smoking marijuana. Marijuana helps these patients get through these very painful symptoms by numbing the body and soothing the stomach. It also improves the appetites of AIDS patients and increases their weight and chance of survival. Marijuana also helps MS patients with bladder control and tremors. The use of marijuana for ...
    Related: legalize marijuana, marijuana, marijuana illegal, marijuana laws, medical marijuana, medical purposes
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