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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: hydrogen bomb

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  • Hydrogen Bomb - 821 words
    Hydrogen Bomb The Hydrogen Bomb The hydrogen bomb is a nuclear weapon in which light atomic nuclei of hydrogen are joined together in an uncontrolled nuclear fusion reaction to release huge amounts of energy. The hydrogen bomb is about a thousand time more powerful than the atomic bomb, which produces a nuclear fission explosion almost a million times more powerful than that of a comparably sized bomb using conventional high explosives such as TNT. The atomic bomb was an essential first step towards the development of the hydrogen bomb, before the atomic bomb w2as developed by the United States during World War 2, there was no way to produce the extreme amounts of heat needed to initiate the ...
    Related: atomic bomb, bomb, hydrogen, hydrogen bomb, u.s. government
  • 1954 - 1,704 words
    1954 In the year 1954, the United States was changing rapidly. President Eisenhower, a Republican, was in the midst of his first term. Eisenhower had just announced to the world that the United States had in fact developed and successfully tested the first hydrogen bomb some two years prior. Mamie Eisenhower christened the Nautilus, which was the first submarine to run on nuclear power. The great court decision, Brown vs. the Board of Education, called for the integration of the countrys public schools. Arkansas and Alabama refused to integrate and President Eisenhower was forced to send the 101st Airborne Division to integrate the schools of these states. The phrase Under God was added to t ...
    Related: washington monument, new zealand, southeast asia, emotion, police
  • After The Atomic Bomb - 1,201 words
    After The Atomic Bomb Introduction The development and usage of the first atomic bombs has caused a change in military, political, and public functionality of the world today. The bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki revolutionized warfare by killing large masses of civilian population with a single strike. The bombs' effects from the blast, extreme heat, and radiation left an estimated 140,000 people dead. The bombs created a temporary resolution that lead to another conflict. The Cold War was a political standoff between the Soviet Union and the United States that again created a new worldwide nuclear threat. The destructive potential of nuclear weapons had created a global sweep of fear as ...
    Related: after effects, atomic, atomic bomb, bomb, hydrogen bomb
  • Change The Game - 1,060 words
    ... h pressure and gravity pull inward on the bubble wall, a bubble that is started from rest will start to contract. With nothing to halt the contraction, it will collapse to a black hole. While a black hole is interesting, it would certainly be viewed as a disappointment by our would-be universe creator. Suppose, however, that the bubble was not started from rest, but instead was given an outward push. If the initial outward velocity is large enough, then the bubble will follow the sequence shown in the figure on the facing page. As the bubble grows, the indentation will become deeper, as shown at the top. The indentation will continue to deepen, developing a neck, or wormhole, as shown in ...
    Related: american television, hydrogen bomb, point of view, parent, elementary
  • Computers History - 494 words
    Computers History Computers This paper is about the computer. Today computers are used by hundreds of millions of people. There have been many advances in the computer. The computer used to weigh 30 tons and filled warehouse size rooms, but today can be as light as 3 pounds and fit in a persons pocket. There were basically three times the computer was mentioned. One as a mechanical computing device, in about 500 BC The other as a concept in 1833, and the third as the modern day computer in 1946. The first mechanical calculator was called the abacus. The abacus is a is a string of moving beads. The first concept of the modern computer was first outlined in 1833 by the British mathematician Ch ...
    Related: computers, history, personal computer, charles babbage, german government
  • Cuban Missile Crisis - 1,000 words
    Cuban Missile Crisis Cuban Missile Crisis During the administration of United States President John F. Kennedy, the Cold War reached its most dangerous state, and the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) came to the edge of nuclear war in what was known as the Cuban Missile Crisis. What was the Cold War? What started the tensions between the United States and the USSR? What actions were taken and how were the problems resolved? All of these questions and more shall be answered in this paper. The Cold War was a struggle between the United States and its allies and the Soviet Union. Although direct military conflict never took place, diplomatic and economic struggle ...
    Related: crisis, cuban, cuban missile, cuban missile crisis, missile, missile crisis
  • Enrico Fermi - 317 words
    Enrico Fermi Enrico Fermi Enrico Fermi was an Italian-American physicist and Nobel laureate, known for achieving the first controlled nuclear reaction (Encarta 98). Enrico was born on Sep. 29, 1901 in Rome, Italy. Formally educated at the University of Pisa, Enrico was also a student of many leading theoretical physics centers. He soon became a professor of theoretical physics at the University of Rome. There he developed many new ways of explaining the behavior of electrons (Encarta 98). Some examples would be the development of the theory; beta decay. The one theory attributed towards him that was renowned in the world of physics and put him on the map as one might say was; the investigati ...
    Related: enrico, enrico fermi, fermi, atomic energy, hydrogen bomb
  • Fusion - 1,354 words
    Fusion Fusion reactions are inhibited by the electrical repulsive force that acts between two positively charged nuclei. For fusion to occur, the two nuclei must approach each other at high speed to overcome the electrical repulsion and attain a sufficiently small separation (less than one-trillionth of a centimeter) that the short-range strong nuclear force dominates. For the production of useful amounts of energy, a large number of nuclei must under go fusion: that is to say, a gas of fusing nuclei must be produced. In a gas at extremely high temperature, the average nucleus contains sufficient kinetic energy to undergo fusion. Such a medium can be produced by heating an ordinary gas of ne ...
    Related: fusion, magnetic field, different types, thermal energy, alpha
  • Fusion - 1,323 words
    ... eating, and the onset of nuclear fusion. The situation in star formation differs in one respect: after gravitational collapse ceases and star begins to expand again due to heat from exoergic nuclear fusion reactions, the expansion is arrested by the gravity force associated with the enormous mass of the star. In a star a state of equilibrium in both size and temperature is achieved. In ICF, by contrast, complete disassembly of fuel occurs. The fusion reaction least difficult to achieve combines a deuteron (the nucleus of the deuterium atom) with a triton (the nucleus of a tritium atom). Both nuclei are isotopes of the hydrogen nucleus and contain a single unit of positive electric charge ...
    Related: fusion, nuclear fusion, high power, greenhouse effect, shock
  • Fusion Energy - 860 words
    Fusion Energy A fusion reaction is one in which two atomic nuclei merge to form a heavier nucleus. this is the process that happens in in the stars. In average stars, like the sun, the process of fusion is converting hydrogen nuclei (or protons) into helium nuclei. There is an enormous amount of kinetic energy and gamma rays released in this process that heat the star's interior, and this realease is what maintains it at the extreamly high temperatures (greater than 10 million K) required to continue the fusion. This process has been making the stars go for billions of years has clear potential as a power source on earth. Once we have started the reaction, Fusion requires no energy and reale ...
    Related: energy source, fusion, kinetic energy, western united states, nuclear weapons
  • Greek Fire - 698 words
    Greek Fire GREEK FIRE The original Greek fire was an invention used as a weapon of the Eastern Roman Emperors. It is also said to have been invented by a Syrian engineer, one Callinicus, a refugee from Maalbek, in the seventh century. The Byzantines of Constantinople originally used it. But they never used the term Greek fire because they claimed to be Romans, and never called themselves Greeks. It was like an insult to them because in their times to be Greek was to have a bad reputation. The Greek fire was first time used in the war of seven years. In which the Arabs established a naval base on the peninsula of Kyzikos. This was on the second attack of a battle started by Theophanes. On the ...
    Related: greek, constantine the great, emperor constantine, hydrogen bomb, louis
  • History Of Chemistry - 1,607 words
    History Of Chemistry History of Chemistry Introduction: Humans have always been very curios creatures. The have always wondered about what they are and why they are here. Our limited knowledge of the environment has always urged for new things to be discovered. The desire to understand the world better has made people search for rational answers, for principles and laws. For centuries people have tried to unlock the mysterious world that surrounds them. History: Because myths did not explain things well enough the Greeks began to ask questions about the world around them. They did this so thoroughly and so brilliantly that the era between 600 and 400 B.C. is called the golden age of philosop ...
    Related: chemistry, history, modern chemistry, little book, golden age
  • Howl And Kaddish By Allen Ginsberg - 1,256 words
    Howl And Kaddish By Allen Ginsberg As you read the first lines of "Howl" and "Kaddish", the overall tone of the poem hits you right in the face. Allen Ginsberg, the poet, presents these two poems as complaints and injustices. He justifies these complaints in the pages that follow. Ginsberg also uses several literary techniques in these works to enhance the images for the reader. His own life experiences are mentioned in the poems, the majority of his works being somewhat biographical. It is said that Allen Ginsberg was ahead of his time, but in fact he was just riding the wave of a literature revolution. The decade of the 1950s was a time of change. America and the world was experiencing a t ...
    Related: allen, allen ginsberg, ginsberg, howl, staten island
  • In 1954, Many Barriers Were Broken That Made This A Year Of Success One Of The Major Achievements Is The Cure For Polio Being - 482 words
    In 1954, many barriers were broken that made this a year of success. One of the major achievements is the cure for Polio being discovered which saved many lives and made the disease extinct. Other successes include the revolution of music and the birth of Rock & Roll. Other achievements this year were the invention of the first 2-seated sports car, the corvette, and the beginning of the Sports Illustrated magazine. During this year, RCA also produced the first color television where families could watch shows such as the Nelsons and the Show of Shows. Swanson also made the first TV dinners that families ate while they watched TV. One of the major barriers that were broken was the invention o ...
    Related: cure, major achievements, polio, sports illustrated, nuclear technology
  • Its The End Of The Worldand I Feel Fine - 1,539 words
    It's The End Of The World...And I Feel Fine Elspeth Wilson Politics & Film Final Paper December 15, 2000 It's the End of the World ... and I Feel Fine! (The role of intellectuals in the creation and justification of nuclear weapons.) In Fail Safe and Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, Sidney Lumet and Stanley Kubrick question the relationship between technology and humanity by emphasizing mankind's tendency to create machines that cannot be adequately controlled. By blatantly revealing the absurdity of game theory (Mutual Assured Destruction as a reasonable deterrence for nuclear war), both directors call into question the dominant pro-Cold War American id ...
    Related: nuclear warfare, foreign policy, scientific theory, minimal, surprise
  • Nuclear Arms - 622 words
    Nuclear Arms On August 6, 1945, Hiroshima was devastated by a most cruel and terrible new bomb, as described by Emperor Hirohito, one of the Axis leaders during World War II. Since then, nuclear weapons have become a major threat to humanity as more and more missiles, bombs, and other weapons are created by different countries. Today, many nations, including the United States and Russia, are working together to disarm their stockpile of nuclear weapons. Germany first started developing a fission bomb in 1939. Albert Einstein, along with other scientists, realized this and wrote to President Roosevelt regarding the threat to the Allies. Shortly after, the United States began serious efforts t ...
    Related: nuclear, nuclear technology, nuclear weapons, president ronald reagan, soviet union
  • Nuclear Independence Day - 1,430 words
    Nuclear Independence Day July 16th, 1945 the first A-bomb was discover until today, unclear weapon are playing a major part of the 20th centurys most reliable military defense system. Throughout the past five decades or so, many strong military nations like United State, Soviet Union (USSR), China, France, England . . . seems very interesting to invest nuclear weapon than any other military weapon. It seems like a country without nuclear weapon wills no longer deserves the title of Great Power! A country is defenseless without nuclear protection. Over the last 50 years, nuclear weapons were developed that dwarfed the 1945 bombs in destructiveness, and major military powers stocked their arse ...
    Related: nuclear, nuclear forces, nuclear fusion, nuclear weapons, tactical nuclear weapons
  • Nuclear Weapons - 1,959 words
    Nuclear Weapons A major problem concerning the world today is the disposal of nuclear weapons. With the Cold War, we have seen a massive build up of nuclear weapons, and no, that we are no longer in a state of global warfare, what is to be done with them? As a result of the build-up in nuclear weapons during the cold war the world is now facing major environmental problems trying to deactivate them, and in addition major debate are occurring on the policies of disarmament and deterrence as solutions to this global problem. Countries are becoming more aware of the fact that their citizens do not want to have to worry about a nuclear attack or environmental effects of nuclear weapons testing. ...
    Related: biological weapons, chemical weapons, nuclear, nuclear disarmament, nuclear forces, nuclear fusion, nuclear power
  • Nuclear Weapons, Explosive Devices, Designed To Release Nuclear Energy On A Large Scale, Used Primarily In Military Applicati - 1,937 words
    Nuclear Weapons, explosive devices, designed to release nuclear energy on a large scale, used primarily in military applications. The first atomic bomb (or A-bomb), which was tested on July 16, 1945, at Alamogordo, New Mexico, represented a completely new type of artificial explosive. All explosives prior to that time derived their power from the rapid burning or decomposition of some chemical compound. Such chemical processes release only the energy of the outermost electrons in the atom. See Atom and Atomic Theory. Nuclear explosives, on the other hand, involve energy sources within the core, or nucleus, of the atom. The A-bomb gained its power from the splitting, or fission, of all the at ...
    Related: atomic energy, energy commission, explosive, explosive devices, nuclear, nuclear energy, nuclear fusion
  • Oppenheimer - 1,222 words
    Oppenheimer Dr. Julius Robert Oppenheimer Julius Robert Oppenheimer was an American physicist and government adviser, who directed the development of the first atomic bombs. To scientists, he was not only the builder of the atomic bomb and a pioneer in atomic energy, but a master of many languages, a good conversationalist and a brilliant mathematician. He was also a writer, and an expert in both the history of architecture and the religions of the world. Oppenheimer, who was born in New York City on April 22, 1904, and educated at Harvard University and the Universities of Cambridge and Gottingen, grew up in a middle class neighborhood. He was raised by his mother, who was an artist who pro ...
    Related: oppenheimer, robert oppenheimer, atomic energy, advanced studies, neutron
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