Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: human understanding

  • 34 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Human Understanding - 821 words
    Human Understanding In the history of human understanding, I couldn't think of any person to study for a singular perspective of gaining knowledge through philosophy. I am glad that the class has been given two philosophers to compare and contrast their ideas. The subject of human understanding is a wide range of ideas to discuss, which can be quite complex, a feat I would never return to do. The two philosophers Rene Descartes and David Hume take the task of discussing human understanding and bring it to the terms in which people can better understand. I say this because in the common people take for granted what we learn to be the truth instead of questioning its existence to be true. The ...
    Related: human mind, human understanding, math problem, mathematical formula, precedent
  • John Locke: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding - 3,907 words
    John Locke: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding John Locke: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: Book 1: Chapter 1 Go: To the Table of Contents | This is the first Chapter | Forward to Next Chapter Book I - Neither Principles nor Ideas Are Innate Chapter I - No Innate Speculative Principles 1. The way shown how we come by any knowledge, sufficient to prove it not innate. It is an established opinion amongst some men, that there are in the understanding certain innate principles; some primary notions, koinai ennoiai, characters, as it were stamped upon the mind of man; which the soul receives in its very first being, and brings into the world with it. It would be sufficient to convinc ...
    Related: concerning human, concerning human understanding, human understanding, john locke
  • John Locke: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding - 3,695 words
    ... fail after they have once understood the words, to acknowledge them for undoubted truths, they would infer, that certainly these propositions were first lodged in the understanding, which, without any teaching, the mind, at the very first proposal immediately closes with and assents to, and after that never doubts again. 18. If such an assent be a mark of innate, then that one and two are equal to three, that sweetness is not bitterness, and a thousand the like, must be innate. In answer to this, I demand whether ready assent given to a proposition, upon first hearing and understanding the terms, be a certain mark of an innate principle? If it be not, such a general assent is in vain ur ...
    Related: concerning human, concerning human understanding, human understanding, john locke, universal principles
  • 1984 - 957 words
    1984 1984 The story 1984, by George Orwell, is set in the fictional country Oceania, in what is thought to be the year 1984, which consists of the Americas, the British Isles, Australia and part of Africa. The part of Oceania in which 1984 takes place is referred to as Air Strip One and is formerly England. Winston, the protagonist of the story, is faced with a conflict of extreme hatred against the ultimate antagonist, Big Brother. Big Brother is the leader of the political party of Oceania who controls not only actions, but also thoughts through the thought police and what are called "telescreens." Winston falls in love with a girl by the name of Julia, and the two of them must decide on w ...
    Related: 1984, point of view, big brother, official language, brien
  • Area 51 - 732 words
    Area 51 Area 51 Introduction:Area 51 has been at the center of the UFO existence controversy for many years. The government denies its existence, but how do you explain Two-hundred forty-three or more white Jeep Cherokees patrolling an area that does not exist? This and many other factors are what contribute to the mystique of the place called Area 51. Paragraph #1:Area 51 is located in the desert on the south central quadrant sector basin side of Groom Dry Lake, approximately one-hundred miles north of Las Vegas, Nevada. The actual base is located on a dried up lake, in the middle of a mountainous dessert. Paragraph #2:Area 51, also known a Groom Dry Lake, is a secret military facility that ...
    Related: area 51, states government, south central, united states government, sector
  • Creativity: Beer Can Theory - 4,998 words
    ... how discrete memories become woven into a worldview. Although this account focuses on integration of the worldview through the emergence of deeper, more general concepts, the principles apply equally to integration of the psyche through the purification of intentions and emotions. A detailed account of the proposal can be found in [Gabora 1998], and elaborations in [Gabora 1999, 2000], but the basic line of reasoning goes as follows. Much as catalysis increases the number of different polymers, which in turn increases the frequency of catalysis, reminding events increase concept density by triggering abstraction - the formation of abstract concepts or categories such as 'tree' or 'big' ...
    Related: beer, cognitive dissonance, love songs, information processing, consciousness
  • David Hume - 772 words
    David Hume I would like to start by stating that the arguments I will present about David Humes "An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding" are not going to be leaning completely towards his point of view or against it due to the fact that I agree with certain views on his philosophy and disagree with others. In "Of the Origin of Ideas", Hume divides all perceptions into two basic kinds: impressions, which are the "livelier" and "more vivid" perceptions; and ideas, which are "less lively" copies of the original impression. He gives some excellent analogies to back this up. For example, he says "when we think of a golden mountain, we only join two consistent ideas, gold, and mountain, with wh ...
    Related: david, david hume, hume, concerning human, point of view
  • David Hume - 772 words
    David Hume I would like to start by stating that the arguments I will present about David Humes "An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding" are not going to be leaning completely towards his point of view or against it due to the fact that I agree with certain views on his philosophy and disagree with others. In "Of the Origin of Ideas", Hume divides all perceptions into two basic kinds: impressions, which are the "livelier" and "more vivid" perceptions; and ideas, which are "less lively" copies of the original impression. He gives some excellent analogies to back this up. For example, he says "when we think of a golden mountain, we only join two consistent ideas, gold, and mountain, with wh ...
    Related: david, david hume, hume, human understanding, cause and effect
  • Embracing The Future With Technology - 938 words
    Embracing The Future With Technology Has technology opened a Pandora's box of social alienation, or alternatively, is it bringing humans into a new era of prosperity and well being? I n the modern world technology is all around. Automobiles, computers, nuclear power, spacecraft, and X-ray cameras are all examples of technological advances. Technology may be defined as the process by which human beings fashion tools and machines to change, manipulate, and control their environment. The increasing pace of technological change in the 20th century makes it difficult to place recent developments into perspective. What new branches of science lay before us? Will new-age pseudo science or religious ...
    Related: computer technology, embracing, information technology, technology, york city
  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,705 words
    ... ion that was to last for 400 years. William was a hard ruler, punishing England, especially the north, when it disputed his authority. His power and efficiency can be seen in the Domesday Survey, a census for tax purposes, and in the Salisbury Oath of allegiance, which he demanded of all tenants. He appointed Lanfranc, an Italian clergyman, as archbishop of Canterbury. He also promoted church reform, especially by the creation of separate church courts, but retained royal control. When William died in 1087, he gave England to his second son, William II (Rufus), and Normandy to his eldest son, Robert. Henry, his third son, in due time got bothEngland in 1100, when William II died in a hun ...
    Related: bank of england, church of england, division, great britain, great schism, latin, political ideas
  • Enlightenment And Economics - 1,167 words
    Enlightenment And Economics The Enlightenment is the name given to the intellectual movement that was centered in the Western World, mainly Europe, during the 18th century. The rise of modern science greatly influenced the enlightenment. It was also the aftermath of the long religious conflict that followed the Reformation. The thinkers of the Enlightenment were dedicated to secular views based on reason of human understanding, which they hoped would provide a basis for beneficial changes affecting every area of life and thought. There were many people during the Enlightenment that made an impact on the world. Many people had different opinions about what was happening and how to fix the pro ...
    Related: economics, enlightenment, french society, south america, grand
  • Enlightenment Of 18th Century - 905 words
    Enlightenment Of 18th Century The Enlightenment is a name given by historians to an intellectual movement that was predominant in the Western world during the 18th century. Strongly influenced by the rise of modern science and by the aftermath of the long religious conflict that followed the Reformation, the thinkers of the Enlightenment (called philosophers in France) were committed to secular views based on reason or human understanding only, which they hoped would provide a basis for beneficial changes affecting every area of life and thought. The more extreme and radical philosophes--Denis Diderot, Claude Adrien Helvetius, Baron d'Holbach, the Marquis de Condorcet, and Julien Offroy de L ...
    Related: enlightenment, jeremy bentham, modern social, human understanding, jean
  • Ethics On Abortion - 1,925 words
    Ethics On Abortion Abortion from an ethical point of view " Describe and evaluate any two contrasting theoretical approaches to the moral debate of abortion." * * * It is widely accepted that the fact of abortion has been a subject of conversation and controversy for many decades. Since the proportion of people who accept abortion as a 'normal' procedure is equal to the proportion of those who think of abortion as a 'crime', through time a lot of measurements have been taken against abortion but concerning it's defense as well. Although the fact of abortion has been examined through it's scientific and religious side, in this assignment we will try and examine abortion from an ethical point ...
    Related: abortion, abortion debate, ethics, morality of abortion, moral agent
  • Evolution Of Paradigm Christianity And The Discovery Of The Individual - 1,117 words
    ... lack of a better word) timescale, and the life of the individual - life on an ontogenetic time scale. Since the discovery of the New World, and because of the discovery, there has been a movement, long resisted by the Church, de-emphasizing the big LIFE side of Christianity while emphasizing the life of the individual and how to conduct life morally. One of the main challenges, or questions to the Church's big LIFE authority was: Where did the Cannibals come from? The church had to find a place for the Cannibals in their existing biblical paradigm. A first response was paradigm mapping; Mendieta found a place for the Cannibals in a parable from Luke 14. As the end of the world neared, a ...
    Related: christianity, discovery, evolution, paradigm, bible says
  • For A Genuine Empiricist The Phrase God Exists Is Meaningless - 1,528 words
    ... ng of the question, a few key concepts must first be established. What is meant by the term Empiricism? To an empiricist, the occurrence of consciousness is simply the product of experience. It is assumed that all human knowledge is acquired from experience and observation alone. It is believed that we are born with an empty slate; it is through sense perception that our knowledge begins to form and shape our mind. Empiricism is against the idea of spontaneous or a priori thought (knowledge that is independent of all particular experience). They believe in a posteriori knowledge, which is derives from experience alone. The belief opposing Empiricism is that of Rationalism. In this philos ...
    Related: genuine, meaningless, phrase, concerning human, gods existence
  • Hinduism - 1,049 words
    ... of nothing?". Later, Uddalaka asks Svetaketu to dissolve salt in water and then asks him to taste it. Even though the boy cannot see the salt in the water, he can taste every part of it. Then Uddalaka compared two experiences to Brahman, saying that like salt, Brahman is present but unseen. "This whole world has that as its soul; that is reality; that is Atman; that art thou, Svetaketu"(Chandogya Upanishad)(Zimmer 1951 p.360). 6 The Brahman is the Self and Self is the Brahman, that relationship was described by many metaphors in the Upanishads'. Here is one of them from Heinrich Zimmers 'Philosophies of India": "' Space is enclosed by earthen jars. Just as space is not carried along wit ...
    Related: hinduism, california press, los angeles, hindu religion, emergence
  • History And Reading Of Tarot Cards - 1,147 words
    History and Reading of Tarot Cards Lesson on Tarot Cards Today during this learning experience, you will learn how to tell your fortune with Tarot cards, what the Tarot cards mean and are, and the history of the Tarot. The History of the Tarot The Tarot cards are basically an old Egyptian "book" which survived and was passed on until today. The "book" or Tarot deck, comprises of 78 cards, in five suits. 4 suits are called the Minor Arcana, and one suit, comprising of 22 cards, is called the Major Arcana. The suits in the Minor Arcana each have 14 cards, and the Major Arcana has 22 cards, numbered one to twenty-one. The last card is unnumbered. The unnumbered card ironically is the Fool. The ...
    Related: history, human understanding, good news, divine inspiration, punishment
  • How Does Descartes Try To Extricate Himself From The Sceptical Doubts That He Has Raised Does He Succeed - 2,342 words
    ... llows: "If a conviction is so firm that that it is impossible for us ever to have any reason for doubting what we are convinced of, then there are no further questions for us to ask; we have everything we could reasonably want." Under my interpretation, this is what it is about the cogito that makes it so important for Descartes, so we cannot have any argument with the principle expressed by him in the above passage. But can it help break the circle? When we clearly and distinctly perceive something, Descartes says, fairly I think, that this perception compels our assent, that we cannot but believe it. God's rle in the system, to these commentators, is as a guarantor of our memory regard ...
    Related: descartes, succeed, make sense, western philosophy, grant
  • Hume On Miracles - 956 words
    Hume On Miracles Hume On Miracles It is evident in David Hume's writing of "An Equity Concerning Human Understanding" that he does not believe that miracles take place. Hume is a man of logic, who believes in experience over knowledge. Of course it is hard for such a man to believe in extraordinary claims without being there to witness them. Especially when such events require a lot of faith. In order for an event to be deemed a miracle, it must disobey the laws of nature. However, it is these same laws that disprove almost any miracle that has ever been reported. He writes that some events that people report as miracles truly are not. For example, it is not a miracle, that fire burns wood, ...
    Related: david hume, hume, human understanding, concerning human, equity
  • Hume, David - 1,006 words
    Hume, David In An Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding, David Hume demonstrates how there is no way to rationally make any claims about future occurrences. According to Hume knowledge of matters of fact come from previous experience. From building on this rationale, Hume goes on to prove how, as humans we can only make inferences on what will happen in the future, based on our experiences of the past. But he points out that we are incorrect to believe that we are justified in using our experience of the past as a means of evidence of what will happen in the future. Since we have only experience of the past, we can only offer propositions of the future. Hume classifies human into two catego ...
    Related: david, david hume, human mind, concerning human understanding, imply
  • 34 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2