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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: hospital care

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  • A Letter From Saudi Arabia - 1,402 words
    ... and an Arabic Muslim. When I say diversity, I basically mean the traditions, the way of practicing religion. I have come to realize the fact that Islam is practiced differently in all the different parts of the world, and the way I practiced it when I was in the US, is certainly quite different from what I have seen and practiced here. Then there are so many customs which actually have their root in the beliefs of Islam, which I was totally unaware of. For example everybody removes their shoes at the doorstep before entering the house, even when you are invited to someones home. Umar told me that it is a tradition that has been carried out for centuries now10. Speaking of traditions, in ...
    Related: arabia, saudi, saudi arabia, labor force, american dollar
  • Abstract - 316 words
    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: The development of patient classification systems (PCS) in fields other than acute medicine raises the question if the principle of using existing data (i.e. diagnoses; procedures where available) is sufficent to describe the products of hospital care. METHODS/MATERIAL: The essence of a PCS (type "iso-cost") is to estimate costs of treatment needed in a defined setting by means of a description of the patient status (conditions) and the treatment goals. Two hypotheses guided our research into PCS development: (1) The description of patient status and treatment goals has to include multiple aspects which ideally are coded by using scales to show changes during the cours ...
    Related: abstract, different aspects, hospital care, diagnoses, grid
  • Aids - 1,527 words
    ... AIDS from handshakes, hugs, coughs, sneezes, sweat, tears, mosquitoes, or other insects, pets, eating food prepared by someone else, or just being around an infected person. A person can't get it from sharing a cigarette, cigar, or pipe, drinking from the same fountain, or from someone spitting on him or her. A person also can't get it from using the same swimming pools, toilet seats, phones, computers, straws, spoons, or cups. Although the virus has been found in saliva, medical opinion states there is no evidence of contamination through wet kissing(What are HIV/AIDS 1). HIV is not spread through the air or water, unlike many other viruses(HIV/AIDS 2). No one has ever caught AIDS by go ...
    Related: aids, protease inhibitors, local government, state and local government, isolated
  • Baby Boomers - 1,668 words
    ... ysical activities and leisure for the aging will do very well. There is a downside to this. After age sixty-six, the likelihood of a person developing Alzheimer's Disease doubles about every five years (Dytchwald, K. Dec. 18. 2000). Unless a cure is found in our lifetime, it is estimated that the disease will strike fourteen million baby boomers by the middle of this century, up from four million today. Dytchwald also notes that the duration of the disease, which currently averages eighth to ten years before death will continue to be prolonged to fifteen to twenty more years or more. One of the first support groups businesses will be interested in are the children of the retiring people. ...
    Related: baby boomer, baby boomers, boomers, morning star, security benefits
  • Changes In Health Care - 1,459 words
    Changes In Health Care In today's society, public perception of the U.S. health care system is widespread. Many people are satisfied with the advancements that we have made in the medical community. Less than one hundred years ago, health care was non-existent. Today, it is one of the leading industries in our country and worldwide. However, many people criticize where health care is going. They believe that doctors are giving up quality care and replacing it with the quantity served. This paper will describe the changes that have occurred and are occurring in the US health care system. Beginning with the health care environment, we will see that although we are downsizing some subdivisions, ...
    Related: care facilities, care system, community health, health, health care, health insurance, hospital care
  • Ebola Hemoragic Fever - 924 words
    Ebola Hemoragic Fever Viral hemorrhagic fevers are a group of diseases caused by viruses from four families of viruses: filoviruses, arenaviruses, flaviviruses, and bunyaviruses. The usual hosts for most of these viruses are rodents or arthropods (such as ticks and mosquitoes). In some cases, such as Ebola virus, the natural host for the virus is unknown. All forms of viral hemorrhagic fever begin with fever and muscle aches. Depending on the particular virus, the disease can progress until the patient becomes very ill with respiratory problems, severe bleeding, kidney problems, and shock. The severity of viral hemorrhagic fever can range from a mild illness to death. The Ebola virus is a me ...
    Related: ebola, ebola virus, fever, hemorrhagic fever, central african
  • Ebola Virus - 1,092 words
    Ebola Virus In the year 1976, Ebola climbed out of its unknown hiding place, and caused the death of 340 people. Fear gripped the victims faces, and uncertainty tortured their minds. The people of Zaire waited outside clinics, churches and in their homes for a treatment of the horrible disease, but there was no cure. They were forced to watch people die, hoping that they would be saved from the violent death of the Ebola virus. From the year of 1976 to the present date of 1996, researchers have searched for origin and cure of the virus. Scientists have carried out numerous studies and investigations, but no one has been able to find the right explanations. Prevention of a world wide outbreak ...
    Related: ebola, ebola virus, virus, west africa, frequently asked
  • May 1987 By Martin H Goodman Md This Essay Is In The Public Domain Introduction: Aids Is A Life And Death Issue To Have The A - 1,706 words
    (May 1987) By Martin H. Goodman MD (this essay is in the public domain) Introduction: AIDS is a life and death issue. To have the AIDS disease is at present a sentence of slow but inevitable death. I've already lost one friend to AIDS. I may soon lose others. My own sexual behavior and that of many of my friends has been profoundly altered by it. In my part of the country, one man in 10 may already be carrying the AIDS virus. While the figures may currently be less in much of the rest of the country, this is changing rapidly. There currently is neither a cure, nor even an effective treatment, and no vaccine either. But there are things that have been PROVEN immensely effective in slowing the ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, domain, goodman, martin
  • Psychiatric Evaluation Of Guy Montag - 723 words
    Psychiatric Evaluation Of Guy Montag 1. Description Of Character At First Meeting - Clarisse A) Physical Appearance Montag is 30 years of age, has a fierce grin and dark shiny eyes. He is usually in his fireman's outfit -- Charcoal stained jacket/pants, dirty helmet with the numbers 451 etched in. B) Mental State Montag is somewhat happy with life, as well as his work -- looks forward to the end of a good day's work, skeptical about new things (technology for one), dedicated, courageous, intelligent, takes chances (gambling), and yet a bit terrified of the thought of Beatty finding the books he has hidden behind the grille in his home. C) Behaviour Pattern Montag is aware of things around hi ...
    Related: evaluation, guy montag, montag, psychiatric, physical appearance
  • Regional Economic Impacts Of Idaho State - 2,829 words
    Regional Economic Impacts Of Idaho State The Regional Economic Impacts of Idaho State University, 1996 Dr. Richard Bowen, President of Idaho State University, requested the Center for Business Research to conduct a study of the impact of the University on Idaho, with particular emphasis on its regional impacts upon the Pocatello area. This publication reports the findings and results of that effort, which was begun in the fall of 1997. This report is a follow-up to, and a complete revision of, a previous study conducted in 1988 (A Report to the President of Idaho State University: The Impact of University-related Expenditures on Idaho's Economy, 1986-87). For several reasons, the direct comp ...
    Related: boise state university, bureau of economic analysis, economic activity, economic analysis, economic impact, idaho, impact assessment
  • Socialized Medicine - 1,739 words
    Socialized Medicine Socialized medicine is a service owned by all citizens and is present in many countries. How does it work and what does it do for a nations economy? One of the biggest fears most people have is becoming sick or injured, and the problem for them is paying for it. Under socialized medicine people would receive health care, regardless of their ability to pay. Everyone would be taken care of without worry of how they would pay for their care. The World Health Organization, part of the United Nations, says that, ⌠health care is a fundamental human right.■ The benefit of national health care would be potential for people to live longer lives. Costs would be driven d ...
    Related: medicine, socialized medicine, health maintenance, plastic surgery, spotlight
  • Suicide Awareness - 1,162 words
    ... frustration tolerance, and poor impulse control" (16). Triggering events for child suicide are seemingly minor life events (16). The suicide rate for fifteen to twenty-four year-old exceeds the overall suicide rate for the total population (Borst 8). The onsets of puberty and hormones that bring out sexual maturation are the most prevalent biological risk factors in adolescent. The sense of identity is a major development task of adolescence. "Teenagers who develop some consistent understanding of whom whey are and whom they are becoming will have foundation of competence in coping with the stresses of this period. In contrast, adolescents who struggle with their identities are less lik ...
    Related: attempted suicide, awareness, suicide, suicide prevention, alcohol abuse
  • The Collective Action Problem Of National Health Care - 1,138 words
    The Collective Action Problem Of National Health Care When societies come together to form governing organizations the goal is to provide a means to deal with public goods. The most basic of these being stability and security for its masses, but as a nation grows its governing bodys obligation does as well. As the nations responsibilities grow the problem of collective action a rises. In this paper health care will be the public good in focus, and how the United States, Canada, and Germany each deal with the disbursement of this public good. A critique of each will be done with three approaches to the collective action problem as the guide. These three outlooks are Thomas Hobbes Leviathan, t ...
    Related: canadian health, care program, care services, care system, collective, collective action, health
  • The Conflict Of Interest Inherit In Administrative Review - 2,807 words
    The Conflict Of Interest Inherit In Administrative Review The Conflict of Interest Inherit in Administrative Review and the Ineffectiveness of the Current Standard of Review by U.S. District Courts Law and Medicine By # I. Introduction The Employee Retirement Income Security Act, better known as ERISA, has been a major issue in healthcare litigation since its inception in 1974. ERISA governs any claim centering on health insurance, disability insurance, or any other employer provided benefits. ERISA affects many aspects of the American legal system, from inter-state commerce to bankruptcy, and particularly insurance and healthcare law. ERISA contains clauses for both the procedure and subs ...
    Related: administrative, conflict of interest, inherit, benefit plans, hospital care
  • Y2k - 1,686 words
    ... at, and (5) electronic formats not Y2K compliant should cease beginning April 1, 1999. If the laws enacted by the U.S. Congress and the president , and the recommendations made by the WSUBC are followed, the Y2K problem will likely have little or no affect on the clerical areas of hospitals. In addition to the patient care and clerical concerns facing hospitals with respect to the Y2K problem, there is one other pressing concern for hospitals. Utilities are essential to the everyday life most people are accustomed to. If the electricity goes out at home, most people just burn candles and wait, without much worry, for the lights to come back on. However, losing utility service in a hospit ...
    Related: water shortage, federal government, electric utilities, suppression
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