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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: grecian

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  • Ode On A Grecian Urn - 1,536 words
    Ode On A Grecian Urn Ode on a Grecian Urn Summary In the first stanza, the speaker, standing before an ancient Grecian urn, addresses the urn, preoccupied with its depiction of pictures frozen in time. It is the still unravish'd bride of quietness, the foster-child of silence and slow time. He also describes the urn as a historian, which can tell a story. He wonders about the figures on the side of the urn, and asks what legend they depict, and where they are from. He looks at a picture that seems to depict a group of men pursuing a group of women, and wonders what their story could be: What mad pursuit? What struggle to escape? / What pipes and timbrels? What wild ecstasy? In the second sta ...
    Related: grecian, ode on a grecian urn, human life, human beings, procession
  • Ode On A Grecian Urnjohn Keats - 447 words
    Ode On A Grecian Urn-John Keats Ode on a Grecian Urn-John Keats The second stanza in Keats Ode on a Grecian Urn begins with the statement, Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard/Are sweeter. Keats views art as something that is eternal and lets you experience whats happening in the painting. While he cannot actually hear the music of the young mans pipes, he can just imagine how sweet the melody would sound. If one was to hear music played, it would only please him for the duration of the song, but in looking at a painting of a youth playing pipes one can take pleasure in it every time he looks at the painting. Of course, in Keats time there were no CDs or cassettes. In the same stanza, ...
    Related: grecian, john keats, keats, ode on a grecian urn, real life
  • Ode On Grecian Urn - 437 words
    Ode On Grecian Urn The second stanza in Keats "Ode on a Grecian Urn" begins with the statement, "Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard/Are sweeter." Keats views art as something that is eternal and lets you experience whats happening in the painting. While he cannot actually hear the music of the young mans pipes, he can just imagine how sweet the melody would sound. If one was to hear music played, it would only please him for the duration of the song, but in looking at a painting of a youth playing pipes one can take pleasure in it every time he looks at the painting. Of course, in Keats time there were no CDs or cassettes. In the same stanza, Keats speaks of the young mans lover. He ...
    Related: grecian, ode on a grecian urn, real life, sacrifice, confined
  • Ode On Grecian Urn - 933 words
    Ode On Grecian Urn Imagine the following: a bride dressed in white on her wedding day, savage men chasing after women, the lingering subject of love, or a peaceful, uncorrupted town. What do these topics have in common? Through the use of these topics, John Keats portrays the theme of eternal innocence and the sufficiency of beauty throughout his poem, "Ode on a Grecian Urn." In the first stanza of the poem which has a rhyme scheme of ababcdedce, Keats introduces the theme of eternal innocence and the sufficiency of beauty with reference to the "unravished bride of quietness." Accepting her purity of not yet engaging in the sexual actions of marriage, the urn portrays the bride in this state ...
    Related: grecian, ode on a grecian urn, john keats, world today, continuing
  • A Few Greek Gods - 1,919 words
    A Few Greek Gods subject = History 9th grade title = A Few Greek Gods The Ancient Greeks believed in a series of myths which explained nature, set up a moral code for the people, and were just folk lore of the people. In this paper, the beginnings of myths, the Greek gods themselves, and several myths concerning morals, nature, and old lore of the Ancients will be discussed. Because the myths and details about the gods were passed along by word of mouth, some myths or gods might be interchanged or different. The Greek myths started as folk lore until it began to explain nature and storytellers integrated a moral code into the myths. Many myths started out as fairy tales. As new and more effi ...
    Related: greek, greek gods, greek myth, moral code, river styx
  • Ancient Greek Theater And Drama - 1,400 words
    Ancient Greek Theater And Drama Ancient Greek Theater and Drama Ancient Greek Theater and Drama Jennifer Mills Theater has been an integral part of almost every society for thousands of years. Starting in the last Sixth century B.C. Theater has been evolving into the glitzy, whirlwind productions of today. But in the beginning, theater was a simple affair. Originating in Greece, theater tradition was derived from religious rituals. The ceremonies of the cult of Dionysus were exuberant; much story telling took place in the form of song and dance. Everyone would partake in the story telling, forming what is known as the chorus. The first man to step out of the chorus and take a role of a chara ...
    Related: drama, greek, greek theater, theater, excellent education
  • Aristophanes, Plautus, And Euripides - 1,236 words
    Aristophanes, Plautus, And Euripides In times of struggle and hardship, people are constantly looking for ways to escape their reality. They have found release from their stress in practices such as exercise, therapy, and meditation. In the ancient times of Greece and Rome, life for the citizens was strict and sometimes harsh. During these times of struggle, people searched for ways to vacation from the laws that bore down upon them. One of the ways they accomplished this was through art. Art was a way to express true feeling and emotion and unite a sometimes-divided population. Drama served as one escape for the citizens in Greece and Rome. Attending the plays written by Euripides, Aristoph ...
    Related: euripides, main character, greece and rome, problems facing, sole
  • Bartel - 927 words
    Bartel By The Scrivener Hawthorne I began my Hawthorne reading task with The Birth-Mark. I picked this story because I am familiar with the Maypole of Merrymount and Young Goodman Brown, and I wanted to try something different. I was pleasantly surprised with The Birth-Mark, in my mind it far surpasses the latter two stories. I think one of the most admirable traits of Hawthorne is his ability to write as though actions are taking place somewhere in the present. Aylmer could very well live today, somewhere in the world with his laboratory in the backyard. Men like Young Goodman Brown are everywhere in todays society, and, still, there are those who try and destroy that which they do not unde ...
    Related: short story, common theme, young goodman, blame, contempt
  • Bible About Muhammad - 5,496 words
    Bible About Muhammad Chapter One : Christian Muslim Responses Debate on TV At the end of the debate - "Christianity and Islam" - which appeared on the SABC-TV program "Cross Questions" on Sunday 5th June 1983, the Chairman, Mr. Bill Chalmers commented: "I think it can be said from this discussion that there is, at present, somewhat more accommodation on the Islamic side for the founder of Christianity than there is on the Christian side for the founder of Islam. What the significance of that is, we leave it to you, the viewer, to determine, but I do think you will agree that it is a good thing that we are talking together." "Bill" as he is popularly addressed, without any formalities, on all ...
    Related: bible, bible says, christian bible, holy bible, muhammad, the bible
  • Dickinsons Poem Because I Could Not Stop For Death - 938 words
    Dickinson's Poem Because I Could Not Stop For Death Thantos, Charon, Death. No matter what we call it, the idea that is death is always with us. It causes great pain, but also inspires. Dickinson's poem Because I Could Not Stop for Death is, obviously enough, about death. But rather than being sad about it, she wants the reader to view death as being an inevitable change, rather than an end to existence. By personifying death, she makes it seem relaxing and serene. She also adds to this effect by using vivid imagery and metaphors, as well as rhythm, to create a poem that plays out in the reader's mind like a movie, due also in part to the dramatic imagery. One of the major parts of this poem ...
    Related: because i could not stop for death, poem, common theme, forgetting, conception
  • Dionysusbacchae - 702 words
    Dionysus--Bacchae The god, Dionysus, fills an integral role in Grecian Myth. According to Euripides' Bacchae, Dionysus represents the animalistic and mystic life force that connects humanity to its innate earthy roots - roots that are illogical, chaotic, and instinctual. In this paper I will be discussing this aforementioned mystic life force and its existence in ancient Greece's supremely logical society. Being as completely logical as the ancient Greeks tended to be, they needed some sort of release valve that kept them from all going crazy in their otherwise rigid existence. The god, Dionysus, provided this release in their world through the manifestations of "wine, women, and song." With ...
    Related: ancient greece, human side, life force, voyeur, pleasure
  • Doryphoros By Polykleitos - 585 words
    Doryphoros By Polykleitos Doryphoros by Polykleitos Sculptors of the Early and High Classical Grecian periods in art strived for perfection in creating the human form. They combined such features such as regular facial features, smooth skin, and particular body portions into an ideal of perfect beauty. Much as modern day advertisement has idealized the slender model as the new perfect female form. One such artist of the time was named Polykleitos of Argos. He was a well-known sculptor and art theorist. His aim in sculpting was to produce the perfect human figure using a mathematical equation to sculpt the body parts. It is believed that he used a basic unit ratio to measure the rest of the b ...
    Related: human figure, shoulder, composition, measurement
  • Euthanasia - 1,792 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia, is one of the most controversial issues of our time. This diver se issue raises many questions such as: how should decisions be made, and by whom? What should be determined as a matter of law and what left a matter of discretion and judgment? Should those who want to die, or who are in a "persistent vegetative state" be allowed to die voluntarily? Who should decide: the patient, the physician, the courts, or the families? The pro-euthanasia arguments turn on the individual case of the patient in pain, suffering at the center of an intolerable existence. When life becomes nbearable, quick death can be the answer. If living persons become so ill that they cannot tolerate ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, social situations, paul d, beloved
  • Fiber Optics - 2,211 words
    Fiber Optics Fiber optics produced by special methods from silica glass and quartz which replaced copper wire is very useful in telecommunications, long distance telephone lines and in examining internal parts of the body (endoscopy). Equipment for photography is available with all current fiber-optic endoscopes. Through a process known as total internal reflection, light rays beamed into the fiber can propagate within the core for great distances with remarkably little attenuation or reduction in intensity. In general, the methods of fiber production fall into three categories; (a) the extrusion method for synthetic fibers; (b) hot drawing of fibers from molten bulk material through an orif ...
    Related: fiber, fiber optics, optics, sedimentary rocks, different kinds
  • Gender Issues In Ancient Greece - 924 words
    Gender Issues In Ancient Greece anne brannen Gender Issues in Antigone One of the most devastating problems for the Classical Greeks was the womens issue. Women in Classical Greece were not citizens, held no property, and indeed were not even allowed out of the house except under guard. Their status differed from that of the slaves of Greece only in name. This alone, however was not a problem -- the problem was that the Greeks knew, in their hearts, that this was wrong. Indeed, their playwrights harangued them about it from the stage of Athens continually. All of the great Grecian playwrights -- Sophocles, Euripedes, Aristophenes -- dealt with the womens issue. All of them argued, in their v ...
    Related: ancient greece, classical greece, gender, gender issues, greece
  • Gender Issues In Antigone - 922 words
    Gender Issues in Antigone Gender Issues in Antigone One of the most devastating problems for the Classical Greeks was the women's issue. Women in Classical Greece were not citizens, held no property, and indeed were not even allowed out of the house except under guard. Their status differed from that of the slaves of Greece only in name. This alone, however was not a problem -- the problem was that the Greeks knew, in their hearts, that this was wrong. Indeed, their playwrights harangued them about it from the stage of Athens continually. All of the great Grecian playwrights -- Sophocles, Euripedes, Aristophenes -- dealt with the women's issue. All of them argued, in their various ways, that ...
    Related: antigone, gender, gender issues, women's rights, civil war
  • Greek History And Food - 1,558 words
    Greek History and Food Greek History and Food Greek cuisine: The Greeks usually eat 3 meals a day. The first meal of the day is Breakfast. A typical Greek breakfast consists of a piece of bread, some goat milk and strong Turkish coffee. The Greeks do not eat a large breakfast typically. Their next meal of the day is Lunch it is usually eaten around twelve to two pm. It is also a light meal like breakfast. Dinner is usually eaten later at night than most people are accustomed to. It is eaten between 8-9 pm. This is the largest meal of the day. The most common meats are lamb and chicken. Fish and seafood are found mostly on the coast and in cities and are inexpensive. Olives are grown in Greec ...
    Related: greek, greek civilization, greek history, greek orthodox, history
  • History Of Track And Field - 1,010 words
    History Of Track And Field The History of Track and Field Track and Field events, also known as athletics, have progressed a great deal since their birth in Olympus, around the ninth century B.C. More athletes and more nationalities compete in Track and Field than in any other Olympic sport. Athletics is one of the largest attractions at the Modern Olympics, drawing in huge crowds of spectators and creating intense interest at summer Olympics. Track and Field events have come a long way since the Ancient Greek Olympic games. Many events and techniques have been revised, added, or eliminated since the original Greek Olympics. The Olympic motto, Citius, Altius, Fortius is describing the Track ...
    Related: art history, history, track, track and field, ancient greece
  • Homer - 858 words
    Homer The Odyssey is one of only a few epics still in existence today. An epic is a long narrative poem which focuses on the lives and struggles of a great hero or heroes. Homer used many literary techniques to make his poetry more fully understood. He was very versed in his Greek gods and uses them as great heroes. The Odyssey was written approximately 2500 years ago. Top scholars have spent much time attempting to confirm who created these epics, The Odyssey and The Iliad, when they were written, and where they were written. These scholars have made their educated guesses, however they are not all in agreement as to exactly where these two masterpieces have come from. Today scholars are st ...
    Related: homer, narrative poem, literary techniques, holy bible, grecian
  • In My Short Life On This Planet I Have Come To Question Things That Many Take Upon Blind Faith We All Know That We Must Some - 1,204 words
    In my short life on this planet I have come to question things that many take upon blind faith. We all know that we must some day die; yet we continuously deny the forces at work inside ourselves, which want to search out the answers of what may or may not come after. It is far easier for humanity to accept that they will go to a safe haven and be rewarded for their lives with pleasures and fantasies of an unfathomable scale than to question the existence of a supposed omnipotent being. Yet, there are a few of us humans who tend to question the why's and wherefore's that society puts forth to us. We question the existence of God, or the creation of mankind rather than blindly accepting faith ...
    Related: blind, planet, big bang theory, scientific facts, confirmation
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