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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: genetic disease

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  • Adopted Children Should Know Their Biological Parents - 563 words
    Adopted Children should Know their Biological Parents Giving birth is like pulling your lower lip over your head -Carol Lucawikz When a mother gives birth to her child it is the ultimate bonding experience. And when a mother gives her child up for adoption, it is a selfless act for the childs best interests, but not a painless one. Every parent that is involved in an adoption arrangement will wonder and worry about their child for many days of many years. Curiosity is powerful, and it is not uncommon to long to be reunited with ones own flesh and blood. Adopted children have a right to know who their biological parents are. Health reasons, curiosity, and the need to bond with family are all ...
    Related: adopted children, biological, genetic disease, family background, parent
  • Albinism - 1,236 words
    Albinism INTRODUCTION For my research project I have chosen the genetic disease albinism. There are a few reasons why I chose albinism as my topic. First and foremost, in kindergarten I had a friend who was an albino, and although I have not seen him in over 10 years I am still curious as to what the causes of albinism are. Back then, my mother explained it to me by saying, thats just the way his skin is which is a fine way to explain it to a five year old, but now I find myself wanting to know more. Another reason I am curious about albinism actually extends from my first reason. I often wondered if there was any chance that my kids could possibly be born with it. I know now that it sounds ...
    Related: genetic disease, bibliography references, human genome, yellow, researching
  • Breast Cancer Why Women Should Be Aware - 1,095 words
    Breast Cancer; Why Women Should Be Aware BREAST CANCER; WHY WOMEN SHOULD BE AWARE In the United States this year 180,200 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer, and 43,900 women will die from the disease (Glazer 555). Breast cancer affects more American women than any other type of cancer (All 1). Breast cancer is one of the top three cancers of all women above the age of 15; therefore, women need to commit themselves and watch for signs of cancer, or we will always have a problem with this life-threatening disease. Breast cancer needs to be explained before you can fully understand the disease. Breast cancer is a group of cells that have proliferated outside the framework of the normal ...
    Related: american women, breast, breast cancer, cancer, cancer research, women in japan
  • Chapter 10 Definitions - 556 words
    Chapter 10 Definitions autosome: any chromosome other than the sex chromosome base deletion: a mutation in which a nucleotide is lost from the DNA sequence base insertion: a mutation in which a nucleotide base is added to the DNA sequence carrier: an individual who is heterozygous for a recessive trait chromosome mapping: a method of determining the relative position of genes on a chromosome using information on crossover frequency crossing over: exchange of parts between two homologous chromosomes deletion: a mutation in which a chromosomal piece breaks off and is lost frame-shift mutation: a mutation in which a base deletion or insertion cause the genes message to be translated incorrectly ...
    Related: turner syndrome, sickle cell, cell disease, error, syndrome
  • Dna Fingerprinting - 1,017 words
    Dna Fingerprinting DNA Fingerprinting DNA Fingerprinting is also referred to as DNA profiling and DNA typing. It was first developed as an identification technique in England in 1985. The original use was to expose the presence of any genetic diseases. About three years later it became used to identify criminals through the analysis of genetic material and to settle paternity disputes. It is still used for those reasons today. The DNA fingerprinting process is called gel electrophoresis. It is a process that can sort pieces of DNA according to its size. The process is done by taking samples of DNA from the crime scene and comparing it with samples from the accused. Samples are taken from bio ...
    Related: fingerprinting, microsoft encarta, genetic disease, multimedia encyclopedia, katie
  • Familial Hypercholeterolemia - 1,006 words
    Familial Hypercholeterolemia Familial Hypercholesterolemia Familial Hypercholesterolemia, a very dangerous and deadly genetic disease, has the potential to be passed via the parents DNA from one generation to the next. Although it is not common, people who suffer from this genetic flaw often times lead very short lives, as it increases their susceptibility to a wide range of other complications that can ultimately lead to death (Varret, 1999). Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) operates by not allowing cholesterol to move into the cells via the blood stream. This is due directly to the fact that protein receptors on the surface of the cell responsible for the uptake of cholesterol are either ...
    Related: familial, heart disease, blood pressure, heart attack, elasticity
  • Gene Therapy Hemophilia - 1,090 words
    Gene Therapy- Hemophilia Genetic Therapy that focuses on hemophilia Gene therapy is reinserting certain genes that helps deal with genetic diseases. There are three basic forms of this gene therapy. The first is Gene Inactivation Therapy in which the transferred gene neutralizes the proteins and evens out the amount or rids of the defective proteins. Another type is Gene Augmentation Therapy where the original form of the gene or the normal form of the gene is inserted into one of the cells chromosomes. This procedure is used normally when a gene with little activity or a deleted gene is the cause for the genetic disease. The third type of gene therapy is Gene Replacement Therapy. This form ...
    Related: gene, gene therapy, hemophilia, therapy, skin cancer
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,849 words
    Genetic Engineering What's Genetic Engineering? Nowadays, scientists have learned a great deal about the chemical changes taking place inside living things. They have deciphered the code, DNA, by which animals and plants pass on their characteristics to their offspring. They have even leant how to alter that code to produce life forms with new characteristics. This new technology involving both chemical and biological science is known as genetic engineering. Through this new technology, we shall soon be able to provide much better treatments, and possibly even cures for certain serious diseases, especially those like inheriting diseases, which cannot presently be cured. Besides, we shall be ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic disease, genetic engineering, genetic mutation, genetic screening
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,422 words
    Genetic Engineering Gena Fawley Ethics Doug McKay 1 June, 2000 Genetic Engineering As we begin the twenty first century, many new technological advancements make themselves readily available to us. One such technological advancement is genetic engineering. Genetic engineering is the altering of human genes in order to perfect these genes, or change them completely. This new technology is very controversial, because it deals with things such as altering our own mortality and perhaps creating the perfect human race. Some people however, feel that gene altering is a wonderful new prospect because it may allow us to prevent certain disease, and thus increase our life spans. Also, those that are ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic disease, genetic engineering, genetic screening
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,874 words
    Genetic Engineering Genetic Engineering Future Harmony or Future Harm The world of science has experienced many profound breakthroughs and advances in the twentieth century, but none perhaps as great as that of genetic engineering. However, the twentieth century society is not prepared or even willing at times to accept the moral and ethical controversies genetic engineering is creating. Genetic engineering, defined as the use or manipulation of an individuals genetic material in order to produce desired characteristics or results in the same individual, other individuals of the same species, or other species, is undoubtedly changing societys relationship with nature, medicine, and perhaps i ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic disease, genetic diversity, genetic engineering, genetic testing
  • Genetics - 2,123 words
    Genetics Genetics: Issues of IVF, screening, pre-selection, genetic testing, cloning and the social implications. James Watson once said, We used to think that our fate was in our stars. Now we know that, in large measure, our fate is in our Genes (Jaroff 1998). On June 26th 2000, The Human Genome Project will unveil its rough draft mapping of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences within the human chromosomes (genetic code), to the public. The project has been ongoing since the late eighties, and is a huge international exercise, which has so far cost approximately 3 billion dollars. The final draft is expected to be complete by the year 2003 and the assumption is that it will have a mas ...
    Related: genetic code, genetic disease, genetic disorder, genetic screening, genetic testing, genetics
  • Genetics - 2,024 words
    ... gument in the Western societies is that parents who have large families want a mixture of sons and daughters, and most patients attending sex/gender selection clinics already have children of the same sex/gender and seek another of the opposite. Once a male child has been born, parents are less concerned about the sex/gender of any later siblings. Statham et al (1993) conducted a survey of British women and was asked in the early stages of pregnancy if they minded what the sex/gender of their baby would be. Fifty eight percent said no and among those who expressed a strong preference six percent wanted a boy and an equal percentage wanted a girl. There was also only a hint of male bias i ...
    Related: genetic disease, genetic engineering, genetic information, genetic screening, genetics, human genetics
  • Gentic Engineering - 2,224 words
    GENTIC ENGINEERING Abstract This paper sets out to defend human genetic engineering with a new bioethical approach, post-humanism, combined with a radical democratic political framework. Arguments for the restriction of human genetic engineering, and specifically germ-line enhancement, are reviewed. Arguments are divided into those which are fundamental matters of faith, or "bio-Luddite" arguments, and those which can be addressed through public policy, or "gene-angst" arguments. The four bio-Luddite concerns addressed are: Medicine Makes People Sick; There are Sacred Limits of the Natural Order; Technologies Always Serve Ruling Interests; The Genome is Too Complicated to Engineer. I argue t ...
    Related: engineering, genetic engineering, authoritarian state, democratic state, diversification
  • Gentic Engineering - 2,250 words
    ... ilities; the difficulties lie not in the means of production, but in the relations of production, the social and political context in which the technology is deployed. A second, and far less Marxian observation, is that social domination has some biological determinants. Patriarchy is, in part, based on women's physical vulnerability, and their special role in reproduction. While industrialization, contraception and the liberal democratic state may have removed the bulk of patriarchy's weight, genetic technology offers to remove the rest. Similarly, while racism, ageism, heterosexism, and so on may be only 10% biological and 90% social construction, at least the biological factors can be ...
    Related: engineering, genetic engineering, animal research, medical research, tier
  • Group 1 - 1,781 words
    ... ms can not be solved solely by Group 1 4 private actions. Not to be said that individuals cannot do anything to help the environment, especially in local communities, but that there are definitely power in numbers. The EPA programs cover many areas for the welfare of this country. Things such as protecting our water supply, air supply, supervising hazardous waste sites, testing toxic chemicals, and regulating pesticides that can enter our food storage. Before any pesticides or toxic chemical is sold in the United States, the EPA must approve the safety of the product, and set a limit to the amount that is allowed to be in the food that we consume. A chemical manufacturer devotes an avera ...
    Related: food and drug administration, genetic disease, federal food, dropping, sprays
  • Human Cloning - 838 words
    Human Cloning Biological Aspects True human cloning involves taking a somatic cell from a person and removing its nucleus. Then the nucleus of a fertilized egg cell is removed and placed in the somatic cell. This is impossible in humans right now because the somatic cells are specialized and there are many genes that have been switched off in them that we do not know how to turn them back on. This was done with frogs however. The eggs were implanted with the nuclei from the intestinal lining of tadpoles. Most of these frogs died or grew into monsters. Of the ones that did grow normally they were sterile. Embryo splitting or blastomere separation is what is most commonly referred to as human ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, ethical aspects, brave new world, american
  • Molecular Biotechnology In Life - 1,156 words
    ... genetic disorders. Biotechnology is widely used in pharmacy to create more efficient and less expensive drugs. Recombinant DNA technology is used for production of specific enzymes, which enhance the rate of production of particular range of antibodies in the organism (Hanson 67). Antibiotics produced using such technology have very specific effects and cause fewer side effects. Also, using similar methods a range of vaccines can be created. Currently, scientists are working on vaccines for fatal illnesses such as AIDS, hepatitis, malaria, flu, and even some forms of cancer. Shrof expects that in the near future vaccines will come in more convenient ways "some will come in the form of m ...
    Related: biotechnology, molecular, recombinant dna, john wiley, assistance
  • Nucleotides - 1,580 words
    Nucleotides The foundation of life as we know it is composed of nucleic acids. Researchers believe that these fundamental building blocks were first formed three billion years ago when the first forms of elementary life began to appear on earth. Nucleic acids have at least two functions. The first of these functions is to serve as a means of passing on hereditary characteristics, and the second is to instruct the cells in the production of specific proteins. Nucleic acids by nature are rather complex and in large numbers, with the help of other types of compounds, create DNA. Nucleotides, often called mononucleotides, are units of repeating nucleic acids. Thusly we know that nucleotides part ...
    Related: nucleotides, genetic code, large numbers, amino acids, precious
  • Nutritional Facts - 1,540 words
    Nutritional Facts The first nutritional "fact" most Americans learn is that iron builds strong and healthy bodies.1 The beef lobby, cereal manufacturers, bread makers, and drug companies have bombarded the public with iron being the cure-all for fatigue and "iron-poor blood." People have been mislead by drug companies pushing iron supplements and by old-fashioned ideas about iron, the magical nutrient of strength. Even the cartoons of the past pushed iron as the secret ingredient in Popeye's spinach. Television advertisements used to urge people to "perk" up their "tired" blood with a liquid iron supplement called Geritol, but the Geritol ad was illegal. The Federal Trade Commission began an ...
    Related: nutritional, human body, blood sugar, federal trade, violation
  • Suicide - 1,096 words
    Suicide A Self-Destruction Suicide is the act or an instance of intentionally killing oneself. According to Emile Durkheim, suicide is applied to all cases of death resulting directly or indirectly from a positive or negative act of the victim himself, which he knows will produce this result (44). Suicide is a rarely ever a spur of the moment thing. Th Susceptibility to suicide is lowest among those who have strong community ties. Involvement in church, synagogue or temple may help the disquieted person feel that he is part of a religious fellowship bound together by ties of sympathy, love, and mutual concern. House of worship often substitute for a missing family. We this reach the conclusi ...
    Related: attempted suicide, suicide, young woman, science class, adolescent
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