Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: academic achievement

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  • Adult Illiteracy - 3,219 words
    ... atic, enemies of early, intensive teaching of phonics. Frank Smith and Kenneth Goodman are two of today's most influential proponents of the look and say or as they would term it, whole language philosophy of teaching reading. San Diego State University Professor Patrick Groff recently reviewed 43 reading texts, all published in the1980's and used by teachers' colleges in training reading teachers, to see if they included the findings of researchers that the code-emphasis or phonics approach to teaching reading should be used. He found that none of these books advocate phonics. In fact, only nine of these books inform teachers that there is current debate about if or when phonics should ...
    Related: adult, adult education, adult literacy, illiteracy, state university
  • Affirmative Action - 3,345 words
    ... Aguilar 1. Affirmative action should be eliminated (Sadler 70). Affirmative action does not solve discrimination problems; on the contrary, it harms those the program is meant help. The program divides society into two groups based on ethnicity; this completely defies the effort to have a color-blind America (where society does not see ethnicity or a color difference in any person). Disguised as an equal opportunity program affirmative action discriminates against non-minorities. Affirmative action has its affects in collegiate admissions and employment, however, remains more controversial in college admissions. Many groups protest the abolishment of affirmative action for sake of higher ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, college admissions, best method, dominate
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity - 1,205 words
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or Hyperactivity (ADHD), disorder beginning in childhood, characterized by a persistent inability to sit still, focus attention on specific tasks, and control impulses. Children with ADHD show these behaviors more frequently and severely than other children of the same age. A person with ADHD may have difficulty with school, work, friendships, or family life. ADHD has also been referred to as attention-deficit disorder, hyperkinesis, minimal brain dysfunction, and minimal brain damage. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder is one of the most common mental disorders of childhood, affecting 3 to 5 percent of school-age ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, deficit, deficit disorder, deficit hyperactivity, hyperactivity
  • Bilingual Education - 1,271 words
    Bilingual Education Bilingual education programs have been implemented for decades. Non-English speaking students in bilingual education programs, however, have shown no academic or social improvement compared to similar students in English-only schools. The disadvantages of bilingual education programs outnumber the advantages. In addition, recent statistics suggest the need for reconstruction of the present bilingual education programs. Schools began teaching academics in languages other than English as early as the 1700s, but not until the 1960s did society recognize the hundreds of thousands of non-English speaking students struggling in the current system. Before that time, immigrants w ...
    Related: bilingual, bilingual education, education classes, education program, education programs, education students, education teachers
  • Children's Psychological Adjustment To Entry Into Kindergarten - 1,388 words
    Children'S Psychological Adjustment To Entry Into Kindergarten Michael Burkhardt Page 2 From an ecological perspective, early childhood development occurs within the multiple contexts of the home, the school, and the neighborhood, and aspects of these environments can contribute to the development of adjustment problems (Bronfenbrenner, 1979). A child's psychological adjustment to entry into school for the first time can have a significant impact on the level of success achieved later in life. Children rated higher in school adjustment by their elementary school teachers, as a result of improved cognitive development, showed positive attitudes toward school resulting in better school perform ...
    Related: adjustment, children's, entry, kindergarten, psychological, psychological adjustment
  • Childrens Iq - 763 words
    Childrens Iq INTRODUCTION The controversy of the IQ test has been going on since the time of Galton. We will take a look at the pros and the cons of IQ testing. IQ testing has been debated for a long time and we will take a look at the pros for IQ testing. A major reason why IQ testing is so widely used is that they are standardised, reliable and valid. IQ testing is a very good predictor on how children will do in school. Today's IQ testing are set up that there are certain tests for children and different tests for adults. The most widely used intelligence test for adults is the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale or the WAIS. And the most widely used children's IQ test is the Wechsler Intel ...
    Related: intelligence test, emotional intelligence, first world, strictly, intelligent
  • Daycare - 1,165 words
    Daycare Daycare has become a controversy because of the great quantity of advantages and disadvantages that it involves. While a very large number of parents have to rely on child care centers because of career ambitions or financial needs that only their jobs can fulfill, most child psychiatrists believe that the ideal growing environment for an infant is at home with the family. The problem is that choosing the right caregiver, a good substitute for the parents, is very hard, and the consequences of a wrong decision can be very detrimental to the childs personality development. This choice depends on many factors like culture, education and especially income. In fact, the financial availab ...
    Related: daycare, basic education, academic achievement, negative impact, economical
  • Divorce And Children - 1,631 words
    Divorce And Children Divorce: Effects on Children Divorce has become an unquestionable remedy for the miserably married. Currently, the United States has the highest divorce rate in the world. Every year in the US approximately one million children experience divorce which, is about one in every three children (Amato 21). The effects of divorce can be tremendously painful for both children and adults. Children of divorce are more likely to suffer from behavioral, social, academic, and psychological problems than children raised in two-parent families. The actual separation of the family will be the initial crisis that a child must deal with but many issues such as economic hardship, moving, ...
    Related: divorce, divorce and children, divorce rate, effects of divorce, parental divorce
  • Domestic Violence: Theory, Effects Interventions - 2,773 words
    ... m establishing a meaningful context for understanding the abuse and may provide, especially for their daughters, a model of passive and ineffective problem solving. Therefore, this passivity can be reflected in school by low academic achievement, school phobia, difficulties in concentration, and social isolation. Mediating Factors It is important to state that much of the research on the effects of children witnessing domestic violence is contingent upon mediating factors, and thus these factors have been taken into consideration when conclusions have been made on the severity of the effects. These mediating factors include the following. Severity of Violence Witnessed Children who witne ...
    Related: crisis intervention, domestic violence, harmful effects, therapeutic intervention, publishing company
  • Ebonics - 1,410 words
    ... t cannot be considered a dialect but it can be considered a form of improper English, slang or jive. According to Zeis (1997), when high school students who speak ebonics go to college, they will have to take English 101 because they are classified as foreign speaking students whose first language is something other than English. Black English is a representation of the culture of many African American students and teachers must recognize this use of language and in doing so, they also acknowledge the rich culture of the students that has been marginalized for years. Educators in California believe that these students can only learn through their roots and that the only way they can get ...
    Related: ebonics, growing concern, american english, academic achievement, spelling
  • Educating Hispanic Students - 1,063 words
    Educating Hispanic Students Education is the key to individual opportunity, the strength of our economy, and the vitality of our democracy. In the 21st century, this nation cannot afford to leave anyone behind. While the academic achievement and educational attainment of Hispanic Americans has been moving in the right direction, untenable gaps still exist between Hispanic students and their counterparts in the areas of early childhood education, learning English, academic achievement, and high school and college completion. Hispanics will represent more than one-quarter of school-age children in the United States by 2025. These children are more likely than others to be educationally and eco ...
    Related: college students, educating, female students, hispanic, hispanic students, minority students, school students
  • Effects Of Marijuana - 1,104 words
    ... tute of Drug Abuse are correct, the suppressed neurones of the hippocampus caused by marijuana use, and McCance and Huether's (1998) research into the suppressed neurones of the hippocampus the following can be concluded. Presence of suppressed neurones in schizophrenia patients clearly links the common theory of a cause of drug induced schizophrenia as being contributed to by marijuana use/abuse. According to Continuing Medical Education, Inc. (www.mhsource.com) this is the reason as to why marijuana had the harmful psychological effect of contributing to drug induced schizophrenia on some individuals who are chronic smokers of marijuana. (www.mhsource.com) Chronic abuse of marijuana is ...
    Related: harmful effects, marijuana, psychological effects, term effects, adolescent drug
  • Ethnic Diversity - 1,286 words
    Ethnic Diversity Affirmative action can be defined as action taken to compensate for past unfairness in the education of minorities. The current system of affirmative action allows universities to admit applicants from certain ethnic and minority groups with lower credentials. The main purpose of affirmative action is to produce a diverse campus population that is comparable to today's society. The use of race as a facto by which someone is admitted to college in the long run will compromise the quality of the university. Implicating affirmative action to solve the problem of diversity on today's campuses has lead to the creation of problems. The discrimination against Caucasian and Asian Am ...
    Related: diversity, ethnic, ethnic diversity, ethnic minority, minority students
  • Every Parent Wants What Is Best For Their Child Though Parents Do Not Have Control Over Everything In - 1,036 words
    ... little more discrete in their judgments, they again find the Coleman results flawed. They also address the fact that because most private schools are catholic, it would be wrong to generalize the private school data set by including all private schools. Instead they address the issue as a public-Catholic one. Attempting to correct the errors in the Coleman report, they do a study of their own. Using the NLS and HSB studies, they find that there is not a substantial difference in the results and that private schools are not better. They do however, point out their shortcomings; that SAT scores are only available for those students who elected to sit for the test and that the data are only ...
    Related: parent, math problem, socioeconomic status, race and ethnicity, decision-making
  • Fetal Alcojhol Syndrome - 1,654 words
    Fetal Alcojhol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) refers to a group of physical and mental birth defects resulting from a womens drinking alcohol heavily or at crucial stages during pregnancy. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome was first named and treated in the late 1960's. This condition results from the toxic effect of alcohol and its chemical factors on the developing fetus. FAS is the leading cause of mental retardation occurring in 1 out of every 750 births. The frequency of FAS occurs about 1.9 times out of every 1000 births according to the latest figures, and minor effects can be seen in up to 20% of pregnancies per year. This number changes drastically for women who a ...
    Related: alcohol syndrome, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome, syndrome
  • Fraternities Are Not All Bad - 664 words
    Fraternities Are Not All Bad Fraternities A fraternity is a men's student organization, formed chiefly for social purposes having secret rites and a name consisting of Greek letters. Fraternities get a lot of bad publicity, as with the hazing problems at U.T. Many people think of guys involved in fraternities as stupid, drunken fools running around pulling pranks and partying, but there is another side to fraternities that many people do not see. Fraternities do have plenty of social events, but they also participate in a lot of philanthropy, service projects, and other school and community related events. In order to join a fraternity, you need to sign up for rush in the first weeks of scho ...
    Related: social issues, extracurricular activities, special olympics, extracurricular, academic
  • Historically Black Colleges - 1,265 words
    ... important questions to ask, and there are numerous reasons and causes for schools to increase the number of students they allow and the number of students wanting to attend these colleges. I have an older brother and an older sister who both attend a historically black college (HBCU), Central State University in Wlberforce, Ohio. I have always had a lifelong dream of attending an HBCU. In fact I was accepted to both Virginia Union in Richmond and North Carolina A&T in Greensboro before I was accepted into Wright State University. My main reason for wanting to attend these schools was the history that they have and the way they made me feel when I went for visits. Those are my personal r ...
    Related: american college, black college, black history, black students, college campuses, college journal, historically
  • Home Schoooling - 1,411 words
    Home Schoooling Home schooling is an alternative to public education. It is a choice that many more parents are making today, and even more are projected to make by the year 2000. It is estimated that at the end of the year 2000 there will be 2,000,000 home schoolers in the United States (Gorder 1996). There are other alternatives to Public School education. Some examples are Catholic or Private schools or a privately hired tutor. There are many reasons why people home school their children. Religious beliefs, academic achievement, social development, moral and psychological reasons are all cited (Wade 1996). However, religious beliefs are often the main reason (Gorder 1996). Some parents fe ...
    Related: home school, home schooling, political issues, winston churchill, interact
  • Immigration: English Immersion - 1,356 words
    Immigration: English Immersion The issue of immigration has been a hot topic in the United States for much of its history. Recently the point of conflict has risen over the issue of bilingual education in public schools. Many people have become opposed to this form of learning and propose a speedy immersion program. Others cling steadfastly to the norm of bilingual education proclaiming that immigrant children would be lost if thrown into mainstream classrooms. Still, some have found middle ground through what have been termed dual immersion programs. Although it is somewhat difficult and complicated to sort through the different perspectives it is necessary; what is decided on this issue wi ...
    Related: english immersion, english language, english speaking, learn english, native english, teaching english
  • Motor Training - 2,108 words
    ... h, and Bryant Crate. Marianne Frosting has a test based system (Gearheart, 1973). The classroom teacher may administer her test in groups. She has five subtests which measure various skills which she states "are necessary to success in academics". She has a series of training exercises in both gross and fine motor skills. Her test is limited to visual-perceptual skills, and the program is basically a visual-perception program. Musk Moisten (Hellmuth, 1968) involves a theoretical framework in which a child can be led in an orderly manner from situations in which he simply responds to commands, to situations in which he actively engages in problem solving and can see for himself the qualit ...
    Related: motor, motor development, motor skills, training program, saint louis
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