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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american west

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  • American Indian Wars - 1,568 words
    American Indian Wars American Indian Wars There is perhaps a tendency to view the record of the military in terms of conflict, that may be why the U.S. Armys operational experience in the quarter century following the Civil War became known as the Indian wars. Previous struggles with the Indian, dating back to colonial times, had been limited. There was a period where the Indian could withdraw or be pushed into vast reaches of uninhabited and as yet unwanted territory in the west. By 1865 the safety valve was fast disappearing. As the Civil War was closed, white Americans in greater numbers and with greater energy than before resumed the quest for land, gold, commerce, and adventure that had ...
    Related: american, american west, civil war, indian, indian affairs, indian wars
  • Black Footed Ferret - 1,603 words
    Black Footed Ferret In the past three decades very few endangered species have been restored to viable populations. The black footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) was believed to be the most endangered mammal in the united states. It is a small mink sized carnivore of the Great plains and intermountain basins The ferrets appear to be obligatory predators on the prairie dogs and once occupied a range essentially identical to that of the prairie dogs. They prey on them and also use their burrows for shelter and nesting. The prairie dogs are considered agricultural pests and competitors with livestock since white settlement first began in the American west. Large scale rodent control programs were ...
    Related: accounting office, endangered species, federal government, crisis, livestock
  • Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee - 631 words
    Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee This book brings to light, and places front and center, possibly the most significant event in American history. That is, the genocide and displacement of the native inhabitants of what was, or would become, the United States of America, thus enabling the formation of the worlds most powerful republic. It is difficult to imagine how most readers, particularly those who are American citizens, would not have their personal perspective or opinion altered, in some small measure at least, by the historical events described within, especially that of the Nez Percs fight for their home. Of the chapters, the most moving and the most effectively presented chapter was The ...
    Related: bury, knee, wounded knee, american west, personal perspective
  • Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee: An Analysis - 695 words
    Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Analysis Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is a fully documented account of the annihilation of the American Indian in the late 1800s ending at the Battle of Wounded Knee. Brown brings to light a story of torture and atrocity not well known in American history. The fashion in which the American Indian was exterminated is best summed up in the words of Standing Bear of the Poncas, "When people want to slaughter cattle they drive them along until they get them to a corral, and then they slaughter them. So it was with us . " Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a work of non-fiction, attempts to tell the story of the American West from the perspective of the ...
    Related: bury, wounded knee, american heritage, manifest destiny, vocabulary
  • Geography Colorado River Geographers Can Tell You That The One Thing That Most Rivers And Their Adjacent Flood Plains In The - 2,425 words
    ... e Powell. The Federal Governments outlook is, "why give the tribes more water?" They gave away their rights, and the Federal government does not have the money for water irrigation projects that would benefit so few people. There is another side to the Indian issue, "first in time, first in right". this means that the Indians were there first, before the laws, so therefore the Indians have first right to the water. This would put a totally different slant on distribution of Colorado River water, but most people feel that this issue would be tied up in litigation for years, and because of the benefits of so few, the Indians would likely lose. Citizens groups have become more vocal in the ...
    Related: colorado, colorado river, columbia river, flood, geography, river basin, rivers
  • Immigration - 903 words
    Immigration For many immigration to the United States would be a new beginning during 19th to early 20th century. There were many acts and laws to limit the number immigrating to the United States. Many of these acts were due to prejudice and misunderstanding of a culture. One such act was the Chinese Exclusion Act. Form this one act many immigration laws and acts were made against foreigners. They hoped to control the number of immigrants arriving on the American shores. The Chinese Exclusion Act of May 6, 1882 was just the beginning. This act was the turning point of the U.S. immigration policies, although it only directly affected a small group of people. Prior to the Chinese Exclusion Ac ...
    Related: immigration, immigration laws, chinese exclusion act, chinese immigrants, irish
  • Introduction - 1,434 words
    INTRODUCTION Hitler was an incredibly gifted person. He was an intelligent speaker, as he managed to sway 14.7 million people to vote for him even though his ideas were unpopular. Hitler was able to take over half of Europe with a country that was heavily in debt and had poor morale. He even negotiated to surpass all levels of government and declare himself dictator. Hitler was a gifted painter although most, if not all, of his works were never published. His paintings were done in watercolors and mostly of landscapes. He was painting even after the year of 1919 when politics became his overwhelming concern. Hitler was an extremely bright child. He even said, The school work was ridiculously ...
    Related: elementary school, american west, alois hitler, extension, architecture
  • Langston Hughes: A Poet Supreme - 1,197 words
    Langston Hughes: A Poet Supreme Langston Hughes: A Poet Supreme Black poetry is poetry that (1) is grounded in the black experience; (2) utilizes black music as a structural or emulative model; and (3) consciously transforms the prevailing standards of poetry through and inconoclastic and innovative use of language. No poet better carries the mantle of model and innovator the Langston Hughes, the prolific Duke Ellington of black poetry. Hughes's output alone is staggering. During his lifetime, he published over eight hundred poems. Moreover, he single-handedly defined blues poetry and is arguably the first major jazz poet. Early in his career he realized the importance of reading his poetry ...
    Related: black poet, langston, langston hughes, poet, american poetry
  • Nobel Prize Winners - 1,442 words
    Nobel Prize Winners The theories of these five men: John C. Harsanyi, John Nash, Reinhard Selten, Robert W. Fogel, and Douglass C. North, made an abundant progress in the Economic Sciences in America and the economy. For these great accomplishments, these five were awarded the Noble Peace Prize in Economic Sciences in 1994(Harsanyi, Nash, Selten), and 1993(Forgel, North). The three economists who was awarded the Noble Peace Prize in 1994 for their excellent work and progress in game theory was know as pioneers in using games like chess and poker as the foundation for understanding complex economic issues. This was precisely half a century after John Von Neumann and Osar Morgenstern launched ...
    Related: nobel, nobel peace, nobel peace prize, nobel prize, prize
  • Notes Thoughts On Of Mice And Men - 1,479 words
    Notes & thoughts on Of Mice and Men Written by John Steinbeck. Born in Salinas, Calif. in 1902. Worked as a laborer and journalist. Focused on the laboring class, dispossessed, underdogs, misfits, castaways, and marginal characters of society what to do with them? Concerned with how society treats them. Title is from Robert Burns' poem "To a Mouse" which has to do with planning and the powers beyond over which man has no control "The best laid schemes o'mice an' men *gang aft a-gley" (*go awry) and it indicates, or suggests, that plans of Lennie and George will also go astray due to forces beyond their control. Some economists of the early nineteen hundreds theorized that the industriali ...
    Related: mice, notes, of mice and men, george milton, john steinbeck
  • Old West By Larry Mcmurtry - 1,308 words
    Old West By Larry McMurtry "Old West" LONESOME DOVE While Larry McMurtry honors certain mythical features of the "Old West," his epic, Lonesome Dove, is the quintessential representation of the realism of the "Old West." By contrast, mythic representations of the "Old West" tend to look absurd and silly. Stories such as the one portrayed in the film "True Grit" appear to be ridiculous because of their one-dimensional presentation of characters, including women; their passive, utopian environments; and their conveniently distinct depiction of good and evil. Larry McMurtry's Lonesome Dove presents characters not larger than life but complex, women who are not frightened and dependent, but self ...
    Related: american west, larry, good and evil, eating habits, dynamic
  • Piute Indians - 1,119 words
    Piute Indians The Paiutes, or Piutes (pronounced PIE-oot), included many different bands, spread out over a vast region. They are recognized as some of the North American Indian tribes. They are usually organized into two groups for study: the Northern Paiutes and the Southern Paiutes. The northern branch occupied territory that is now northwestern Nevada, southeastern Oregon, southwestern Idaho, and northeastern California. The southern branch lived in territory now part of western Utah, southern Nevada, northwestern Arizona, and southeastern California. The Northern and Southern Paiutes spoke varying dialects of the Uto-Aztecan language family, related to the Shoshone dialect. The name Pai ...
    Related: native americans, great basin, ghost dance, highlands, frontier
  • Pony Express, Mail Service Operating Between Saint Joseph, Missouri, And Sacramento, California, Inaugurated On April 3, 1860 - 289 words
    Pony Express, mail service operating between Saint Joseph, Missouri, and Sacramento, California, inaugurated on April 3, 1860, under the direction of the Central Overland California and Pike's Peak Express Company. At that time, regular mail delivery took up to three weeks to cross the continent. The Pony Express carried mail rapidly overland on horseback the nearly 2000 miles between St. Joseph and Sacramento; the schedule allowed ten days for the trip. The mail was then carried by boat to San Francisco. Stations averaging at first 40 km (25 mi) apart were established, and each rider was expected to cover 120 km (75 mi) a day. Pony Express riders were usually lightweight young men, often te ...
    Related: mail, operating, pony express, saint, saint joseph
  • Souix Uprising - 553 words
    Souix Uprising I will admit that I am not much for reading. I will also admit after reading the first chapter in this book that I felt sick to my stomach, literally. That I feared reading the rest of the book knowing that this really happened and that people could actually do this to one another. Although the book disgusted me after the first chapter that I didnt want to read it anymore it also made me not want to put it down. It could have been the way the writer described everything made it all so vivid and clear or maybe it was the fact that it was so gruesome and real that I had to read it. Whatever the truth may be I thought it was a very good book. Up until this class I hadnt even hear ...
    Related: uprising, good book, president lincoln, american west, sioux
  • Stereotypes Of Native Americans In Modern Films - 1,818 words
    Stereotypes Of Native Americans In Modern Films The savage persona, the war paint, the feathers and the beating drums are just some of the stereotypical images and attributes associated with Native American culture. The casting of Native Americans into villainous roles of early film and television has perpetuated a false perception of Native Americans that is still tied to their culture today. For centuries, Native Americans have been defined by stereotypical perceptions of Indian culture. These preconceived notions of Native culture are amplified if not derived from, the racially biased portrayal of Native Americans in the mass media and film throughout history. Though some of the modern de ...
    Related: american attitudes, american children, american culture, american literature, american people, american west, films
  • The Life Of Doc Holliday - 1,315 words
    ... and, therefore, his aim was off. Doc fired several shots, all of them missing their mark, and Joyce hit Doc on the head with his pistol. Joyce ended up with a shot through the hand, the saloon's bartender was shot in a toe on his left foot, and Doc was arrested and charged for assault with a deadly weapon. He was found guilty of the charge and fined. On March 15, 1881 a stagecoach was held up and its driver and a passenger were killed. The "Cowboys" took this opportunity to try to get rid of Doc. They stated that he was one of the four holdup men. The local lawman, Sheriff Behan and Deputy Stilwell, found "Big Nose" Kate in a drunken state after another of her and Doc's break-ups. The go ...
    Related: charles scribner, great american, district attorney, posse, cruz
  • The Strugle For The California Condor - 1,346 words
    The Strugle For The California Condor Lorin McNulty McNulty 1 Environmental Biology Biology Mid-Term 10 April 2000 THE STRUGGLE FOR THE CALIFORNIA CONDOR The natural environment of the modern world has been under siege for the better part of the past century. This has been due to many factors. The waste produced by an ever-expanding human population has tainted much of the natural resources available to both humans and animals alike. Efforts to curb this waste output and to more effectively dispose of the waste have failed in the mainstream. The constant change of the common environment instituted by humans who have collectively sought to modify their own habitat has exacted a high toll on t ...
    Related: california, condor, natural order, natural environment, considerable
  • The Strugle For The California Condor - 1,354 words
    ... birds in the wild. There was increasing pressure from the California Fish and Game Commission, The Audubon Society, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service to implement an aggressive program to save the remaining condors. Two years later, a positive observation was made by biologists of California Condors laying replacement eggs after losses of first laid eggs at remote nesting sites. This provided additional credence to the idea of using the double clutching technique with McNulty 7 captive pairs to regenerate the species. The Condor Research Center was granted license to attempt deliberate placement clutching or condor pairs to aid in a captive-breeding program. Several years passed with ...
    Related: california, condor, southern california, national forest, los angeles
  • Throughout American History, Afroamericans Have Had To Decide - 1,063 words
    ... Civil War began, blacks weren't allowed to fight in the Union army." (Utley 18) Unfortunately, Abraham Lincoln was more concerned with political relations than the treatment of Afro-American slaves. The federal government and the Union army only began to "adopt a policy of allowing and even encouraging the recruitment of Blacks when it became clear that the war would be a long and drawn out conflict in which it was essential to mobilize all the resources possible and to weaken the enemy as much as possible. (Mullen 19 Utley 47) Even then Black troops weren't really used. In Muly 1862, Congress authorized the use of black soldiers in the Civil War, but there "was no follow-up until Januar ...
    Related: african american, afro american, american, american history, american soldier, american west, spanish american
  • Us Landforms - 660 words
    US Landforms The Coastal Plains are covered with swamps and estuaries. Piedmont is covered with hard rocks, which meets softer coastal plains. The Appalachian Highlands offers gaps and thin, stony soil for farmers. h Bodies of Water: The East and Southern United States' bodies of water are none other then the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. h Climate: The climate of this area offers hotter and longer summers and the winters are colder and harsher. Precipitation is fairly even. Heavier precipitation is found in the warmer months. h Plants: The plants found in this part of the United States are mostly needle-leaf and hardwood. Here are the examples of needle-leaf plants listed in our bo ...
    Related: landforms, pacific ocean, pacific coast, america west, squirrel
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