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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: food production

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  • Genetic Engineering In Food Production - 1,689 words
    Genetic Engineering In Food Production Genetic Engineering in Food Production: Is it Safe, Wise, and Moral? Over the past couple of decades much debate has been going on about the use of advanced technology in the field of biology. Ever since the first gene was cloned in 1973, genetic engineers have been pursuing at break-neck speed the unlimited possibilities promised by biotechnology (Davidson 1993). Their excitement, which has generated billions of investment dollars for the industry, is understandable. Bioengineering allows scientists to identify specific gene sequences responsible for particular characteristics and then to transfer the genes -- and the specific trait -- into entirely di ...
    Related: engineering, food and drug administration, food production, food products, genetic, genetic engineering
  • Tropical Africa: Food Production And The Inquiry Model Hunger Is The Result Of Disasters Such As Drought, Floods, The Changin - 452 words
    Tropical Africa: Food Production and the Inquiry Model Hunger is the result of disasters such as drought, floods, the changing of the jet stream patterns and other natural disasters. They are beyond our control. It has been estimated that one third of the land in Tropical Africa is potentially cultivable, though only about 6% of it is currently cultivated. However, to change farming from a low-input, low-yield pattern to a high-input, high-yield pattern necessitates the use of more fertilizer and the planting of high-yielding varieties of crops. There are a number of environmental factors, related mostly to climate, soils and health, resisting easy developmental solutions. Rainfall reliabili ...
    Related: disasters, food production, hunger, inquiry, natural disasters, tropical, tropical africa
  • Agricultural Crisis - 1,233 words
    Agricultural Crisis The Agricultural Crisis: Crisis of Culture In this novel by Wendell Berry, Berry's describes in his thesis that modern culture is destroying the agricultural culture. He feels that technology is seen as the easy way to produce food faster and more efficiently. With this modern way of farming comes the idea that hard work is not needed to make a living. The goal is comfort and leisure. Berry feels that this is the reason for the deterioration of the agricultural culture. He believes that hard work and pride in workmanship is more important than material goods and money. This was by no means a perfect society. The people had often been violent wand wasteful in the use of la ...
    Related: agricultural, crisis, military force, young children, displacement
  • Asteroid, Meteor, Or Comet Impact On The Earth - 568 words
    Asteroid, Meteor, Or Comet Impact On The Earth! Richie Nover Per. 2 Science Regents Paper Project One Asteroid, Meteor, or Comet Impact on the Earth! An asteroid is a small or minor planets that are members of the solar system and move in elliptical orbits. Usually found between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. A comet is relatively small, rocky, and icy. It revolves around the sun. When a comet passes close to the sun some of the ice turns to gas. This gas and some loose dust creates a long, bright tail that trails behind the comet. A meteor is a small solid object entering a planets atmosphere from outer space. Meteors sometimes come as fireballs, and shooting or falling stars. If anyone of ...
    Related: comet, food production, outer space, ground zero, solar
  • Capital Punishment - 1,264 words
    Capital Punishment Sign of the Times The new millenium has ushered in many wonderful things for the world to look forward to such as new advances in medical science, food production technology, and communication systems that allow even the most remote places on earth to a wealth of information instantly. However, many places around the world have taken three steps back in human rights for every step taken in technological advances. Capital punishment heads up this A-list if you will, of crimes against humanity that are carried out in the name of justice each and every day globally. We are inundated with images of violence and so-called reality based TV shows that use shock value to get ratin ...
    Related: capital punishment, punishment, social issues, penalty information center, abuse
  • Chernobyl - 1,926 words
    ... medical observation of the population has not revealed any increase in other cancers, as well as in leukemia, congenital abnormalities, adverse pregnancy outcomes or any other radiation caused disease that could be attributed to the Chernobyl accident. Large scientific and epidemiological research programs, some of them sponsored by international organizations such as the WHO and the EC, are being conducted to provide further insight into possible future health effects. However, the population dose estimates generally tend to indicate that, with the exception of thyroid disease, it is unlikely that the exposure would lead to discernible radiation effects. In the case of the liquidators ...
    Related: chernobyl, significant impact, international organizations, international community, observation
  • Cloning Is It Ethical - 1,152 words
    Cloning- Is It Ethical Genetic Engineering; Cloning In today world of advanced technology and even faster progress of this technology one has to stop and examine what we have accomplished. How far do we want to go with this technology of genetic engineering, particularly in the field of cloning. Examining genetic engineering and its many possibilities holds great hope for the future. Centrally the issue of cloning has been a hot topic in the media mainly because its has become a technological as well as a medical breakthrough. The possibilities of cloning are innumerable that is, if it works. But the other side of the coin are the ethics of the process. What happens when we master cloning of ...
    Related: cloning, ethical, drug administration, united states food, eggs
  • Destalinization - 1,646 words
    De-Stalinization Although many of his ideas did not bring the expected results, Nikita Khrushchev policies of de-Stalinization were politically wise. He went against many of Stalins tyrannical policies and gave the people a much greater sense of freedom. In the process known as "de-Stalinization", legal procedures were restored, some greater degree of meaningful public controversy was permitted, forced labor camps were closed and the secret police tactics of Stalins era were erased. Stalins method of personal rule was replaced by group rule and more orderly processes of government, the terror apparatus was largely dismantled, the economy was notably modernized and foreign policy was conducte ...
    Related: cuban missile crisis, foreign policy, food production, hydroelectric, congress
  • Egypt - 1,703 words
    Egypt Place yourself in an ancient world. On September 28th, 2000 my boyfriend and myself attended the Metropolitan Museum of Art located in New York City, to visit an archeological exhibit on Egyptian Art. Located in the first floor off 83rd street and Fifth Avenue, the exhibit consists of thirty-two galleries each illustrating a time period in Egyptian history. It is difficult to elucidate the colossal impact this exhibit delineates. But given the chance in this essay, I will try to depict to the reader how The Metropolitan Museum of Art has successfully designed an overall picture that reflects the aesthetic values, history, religious beliefs, and daily life of the ancient Egyptians over ...
    Related: egypt, second half, egyptian civilization, roman period, item
  • Emerging Waterborne Pathogens - 668 words
    Emerging Waterborne Pathogens In todays food preparation world waterborne pathogens are becoming a real threat. Why? Simply because in todays culture people are quick to blame the food industry for most cases of disintary or other ill effects caused by bacteria. In this paper several things will be discussed. To understand what Im trying to say, you must understand a few key terms. First lets define waterborne pathogen. A waterborne pathogen is a micro-organism whose ability to cause disease has recently been identified. Now that you know what a waterborne pathogen is lets name a few. 1. Bacteria in the form of, Arcobacter Butzleri Helicobacter Pylori And E. Coli 2. Viruses Rotaviruses and A ...
    Related: emerging, pathogens, waterborne, health effects, works cited
  • European Studies - 2,806 words
    European Studies SUBJECT : EUROPEAN STUDIES A TITLE : Discuss the relative merits/demerits of an agricultural policy oriented to price reform rather than one based upon structural reorganisation GRADE : First Honour AUTHOR's COMMENTS : I think it's pretty okay. Email if anyine has any comments @ TUTOR'S COMMENTS: Excellent essay! Indepth, critical analysis. Watch length!! "The common market shall extend to agriculture and trade in agricultural products. Agricultural products means the products of the soil, of stock-farming and of fisheries and products of first-stage processing directly related to these products....The operation and development of the common market for agricultural products ...
    Related: european currency, european monetary, european union, environmental protection, international relations
  • Genetic Engineering - 938 words
    Genetic Engineering A girl is born without Tay-Sachs disease, a devasting genetic disorder that has decimated a lot of babies worldwide. A leukemia patient has defective bone marrow replaced with healthy bone marrow that was cloned from tissue from her own cells. These futuristic scenarios are not part of the debate for genetic engineering but they should be. Many people are afraid that somebody will clone Hitler or some evil person, but that is far from the fact. Genetic engineering can be used to make many aspects of human life better, including saving lives. The rapid development of humanitys ability to control the gene will eventually lead to a promising future for the entire planet as a ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic disorder, genetic engineering, genetic screening
  • Genetic Engineering - 502 words
    Genetic Engineering Imagine a world full of mini Hitlers seeking world domination, killing millions as their solution to establish a superior race or bunch or 2 headed humans eating a pig with 6 legs. These scenarios may sound like something out a science fiction novel, but this is the kind of things that people think about when they hear the words genetic engineering Genetic engineering is now an important part of this world. It is used to cure diseases, develop food that grows faster and food thats healthier. Without genetic engineering it will not be possible to feed the 10 billion humans expected by the year 2030. Only by using this new technology can we increase the food production enou ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic engineering, cystic fibrosis, health care
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,874 words
    Genetic Engineering Genetic Engineering Future Harmony or Future Harm The world of science has experienced many profound breakthroughs and advances in the twentieth century, but none perhaps as great as that of genetic engineering. However, the twentieth century society is not prepared or even willing at times to accept the moral and ethical controversies genetic engineering is creating. Genetic engineering, defined as the use or manipulation of an individuals genetic material in order to produce desired characteristics or results in the same individual, other individuals of the same species, or other species, is undoubtedly changing societys relationship with nature, medicine, and perhaps i ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic disease, genetic diversity, genetic engineering, genetic testing
  • Genetically Altered Food - 1,683 words
    Genetically Altered Food Genetic modification of organisms in general is a biotechnological process that forces genes to behave according to certain characteristics. Changing characteristics of organisms is based on changing their DNA (tech deoxyribonucleic acid; the acid which carries genetic information in a cell). It is being used for modifying genes in plants, animals or micro-organisms. It is being also used especially with food in order to improve the nutritious quality, make less use of chemicals such as pesticides, which proved to be extremely harmful, and sometimes to add flavour. Genetically modified food (GMF) is considered one of the modern production improvements and the largest ...
    Related: engineered food, food production, genetically, genetically modified, world population
  • Genetically Engineered Foods - 1,019 words
    Genetically Engineered Foods Introduction The use of genetically engineering in agriculture and food production has an impact, not only on the environment and biodiversity, but also on human health. Therefore, thorough biosafety assessment requires, not only an evaluation of environmental impacts of genetically engineered organisms, but also an assessment of the risks that genetically engineered food pose for the health of consumers. Let us take deeper look at some of the aspects related to genetically engineered foods. What is Genetic Engineering? Genetic engineering is a laboratory technique used by scientists to change the DNA of living organisms. DNA is the blueprint for the individualit ...
    Related: engineered food, food additives, food production, genetically, genetically engineered food
  • Global Imbalance In Food Supply - 646 words
    Global Imbalance In Food Supply Right now, developing countries are starving to death and the developed countries are worried about which type of cheese they should buy. This is called an imbalance in food supply. There's too much food in the developed countries, and not enough in the developing countries. Three quarters of the world's population is inadequately fed and the majority of these live in the developing countries. Massive surpluses exist in Europe and the US. Malnutrition and undernutrition is generally caused by poverty. Markets in the developed countries are often too big and produce too much food for a population to consume. Developed countries' agriculture is lacking from unem ...
    Related: food production, food security, food supply, imbalance, national income
  • Group 1 - 1,748 words
    Group1 1 OUR FOOD SYSTEM After a long hard day of work you sit down in your comfortable recliner and open up your favorite snack. But when you reach into grab a piece, you pull out a dead bug. Suddenly many thoughts come into your mind, you wonder how did the bug get there and was it dead or alive. Is it harmful or carry a disease. You ask yourself did the bug come from the United States or another country and where was your snack made? As all these questions come into your head, you wonder who can give you the answers. Fortunately, the government thought about these conflicts and established several governmental agencies to protect Americans in food safety. These agencies are responsible fo ...
    Related: environmental protection, president abraham lincoln, department of agriculture, parasites, consumers
  • Guns, Germs And Steel - 1,033 words
    Guns, Germs And Steel Book Review on Jared Diamonds Guns, Germs and Steel Why is it that Europeans ended up conquering so much of the world? Or as Yali puts it in the far beginning of the book, Why is it that you white people developed so much cargo and brought it to New Guinea, but we black people had little cargo of our own? Despite all the contrary evidence from anthropology and human biology, many persist in attributing the differing political and economic successes of the worlds peoples to historical contingency. On the other hand though, the author sees the fundamental causes as environmental, resting ultimately on ecological differences between the continents and as he well puts it on ...
    Related: steel, fertile crescent, new guinea, book review, fertile
  • Hopewell Culture - 1,758 words
    ... different raw materials. These raw materials included copper (seemingly the choice metal of the people over gold and silver), stone, bone, and flint-knappers, specialists in mica and highly skilled ceramists. Ceramics underwent a change through time and were traded extensively. Normally they were tempered with gritty sand or pulverized limestone and paddled with a cord paddle or a wrapped stick. There were squat jars used in burials that were smaller and thicker rimmed and diagonally hatched or crosshatched (1-2% of most finds), and conical or spherically expanding flat-based pots with a flared mouth, used for cooking and storage, generally a utilitarian ware. Rocker stamping done with s ...
    Related: american culture, hopewell, gulf of mexico, brace jovanovich, fieldwork
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