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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american nation

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  • 272: Number Of Words That Redefined America - 1,107 words
    272: Number Of Words That Redefined America The two hundred seventy-two words of President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address are as significant today as they were six score and seventeen years ago. Garry Wills' Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America, explicates these two hundred seventy-two words and paints a new picture that gives us the historical context of the President's speech. It was short enough for generations of people to remember, yet at the same time, long enough to have a great impact on the ways we think of this great republic. Wills argues that through his speech Lincoln remade the American history in that Americans would interpret the Civil War, and the Constitution, ...
    Related: america, america history, united states of america, american history, president lincoln
  • A Booming End To The 19th Century - 1,105 words
    A Booming End To The 19Th Century More changes occurred in America in the late 19th century than any other time period. The country went through rapid expansion from residents of its land to cuisine to transportation of goods and people. While the last quarter of the 20th century brought many modern conveniences, the century before brought this country things that would be nearly impossible to live without. The development of railroads was the single greatest change in the 19th century. In only twenty-five years, almost 70,000 miles of tracks were laid. This in itself was a great feat, because of all the people and products used in the building of the railroads. In order to build railroads, ...
    Related: civil war, conspicuous consumption, raw materials, layout, telephone
  • Amazing Grace - 1,068 words
    Amazing Grace Within the next few pages here I intend to address two issues. First I will try to give a personal review of what I saw this book to hold, and second I will try explain the revelence which this book has to the field of Public Administration. First try to picture children in a slum where the squalor in their homes is just as bad as that which is in the streets. Where prostitution is rampant, thievery a common place and murder and death a daily occurrence. Crack-cocaine and heroin are sold in corner markets, and the dead eyes of men and women wandering about aimlessly in the streets of Mott Haven are all to common., Their bodies riddled with disease, disease which seems to contro ...
    Related: amazing, grace, men and women, york city, mott
  • Blowback, And American Foreign Policy - 875 words
    Blowback, And American Foreign Policy BLOWBACK, AND AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY America prides itself on being the world's largest superpower, and the American public rarely hears about wrongdoings made by the American government. On the occasional occurrence when the media has delivered such controversial news, it is gone before the public really has a chance to absorb all the information. American foreign policy is often times possibly doing more harm than good to foreign nations and the way in which certain matters are handled reflects on the American nation as a whole. In Chalmers Johnson's book, BLOWBACK, he criticizes the American government for not taking full responsibility for its actio ...
    Related: american, american foreign, american foreign policy, american government, american military, american nation, american public
  • California Golden Rush - 1,379 words
    ... week and often seven. Often men would be removing the sand knee deep in ice-cold water for hours on end. One miner summarized the labors of mining in these terms: "Mining is the hardest work imaginable and an occupation which very much endangers health. A weakly man might about as well go to digging his grave as to dig gold."(Rohrbough, 138). Few forty-niners were prepared for the incredibly hard work. Working fifty pans of dirt in a ten hour day was a reasonable goal. But digging the dirt to fill those pans, sorting it out, and panning for the gold became more work than most gold seekers had anticipated. For a man who could endure hardships, could handle the incredible amount of labor, ...
    Related: angeles california, california, california gold rush, california press, california university, gold rush, golden
  • Canadian Fur Trade - 1,385 words
    ... upplies, more primitive implements disappeared and the methods of making them were forgotten This dependance was what destroyed the culture and freedom of the Natives of Canada involved in the fur trade. Once the Natives had forgotten their old ways they became dependent on European goods to survive. So long as the fur trade persisted, the Natives could survive, but by the mid nineteenth century the animals they hunted had almost disappeared. The Natives could not even rely on the fisheries for enough food to survive anymore: moose and deer had virtually been exterminated from the forest country, and fisheries were said to be unreliable . These starving Natives started drifting into colo ...
    Related: canadian, canadian journal, canadian society, fur trade, twentieth century
  • Cause Of The Culture Wars - 1,076 words
    ... under control of the tyrant neccessary because of the need to organize the production and distribution of resources. The patriarchial tyrant was the perfect organizer to make it all happen. And so it began. With the development of the army, societies now began to have an investment in male dominated governments that quickly became so deeply ingrained in culture, that most people assume they are genetic in origin. This was reflected in new religions that revolutionized human spirituality. Gone were the benign fertility goddesses (or at least they were sublimated), and they were replaced by fierce, warlike gods intended to intimidate. These gods not only were intended not just to intimidat ...
    Related: culture wars, satellite technology, in another country, self determination, dominant
  • Cowboys - 731 words
    Cowboys Cowboys How they started Cattle ranchers began to move out onto the Great Plains in the mid 1800s In the late 1800s cowboys became popular in the cattle industry. The American cowboys owe their knowledge of how to tame the cattle to vaquerars (the Mexican cowboys). The animals originally were from the ranches in southern Texas formerly operated by Spaniards and Mexicans. The cowboys often called the wild cattle longhorns, which were the huge herds of wild cattle. About one- third of the cowboys were free black men who had moved west after the Civil War. Each year Texas ranches would collect huge herds of cattle and start them northward on what was called the long drive. The cowboys w ...
    Related: brace jovanovich, drinking water, american nation, brown, bacon
  • Crucible Tale Of Trials - 1,164 words
    ... ious decisions, though, the government powered by theocracy had undermined both the people's rights and their privacy. One civilization taken by madness is harrowing enough, but the real-life drama that submerged Salem Village and left its people in a state of hysteria was unfortunately to be repeated in almost parallel form. Indeed, the similarities between the HUAC trials in the 1950s and the Salem witch trials as portrayed in The Crucible are horrifying. Both trials were initiated by individuals who called out the guiltiness of others in order to somehow better their own positions in society. Abigail Williams and her friends went against the conformity of their Puritan religion, which ...
    Related: crucible, salem witch trials, tale, the crucible, witch trials
  • Democracy - 1,277 words
    ... the South, promising them better trade relations with the troubled Asian markets in the 1970s (Avirett 22). All these are just a few examples of politicians taking every advantage possible to gain more money for their campaigns, undermining the legitimacy of the American government. The method in which we elect the President, on the other hand, is fairly legitimate. The electoral college consists of representatives who we elect, who then elect the President. Because this fills the requirement of regularly scheduled elections, it is a legitimate process. The President is extremely powerful in foreign policy making; so powerful that scholars now speak of the "Imperial Presidency," implying ...
    Related: democracy, american government, judicial review, united states government, asian
  • Eco Tourism In Costa Rica - 250 words
    Eco Tourism In Costa Rica The Republic of Costa Rica is in the midst of a dramatic transition from a small, Central American nation known for its bananas and good coffee into a gateway for international commerce between Latin America and the rest of the world and a well traveled, if not over traveled, tourist destination--and rightfully so. Costa Rica is a highly attractive country filled with beautiful mountain ranges, undisturbed beaches and friendly natives or Ticos. In addition, Costa Rica offers a highly educated work force, a stable economic and political environment, and exceptional communications and transportation networks--especially in comparison to its neighbors, Panama and Nicar ...
    Related: costa, costa rica, rica, tourism, culture society
  • Franklin D Roosevelt - 1,662 words
    ... Garner were renominated to represent the Democrats. They were running against Alfred Landon and Frank Knox. The Republicans tried to bring Roosevelt down, saying he failed in keeping his promise to balance the budget. But Roosevelt responded by sharing how he succeeded in ending the Depression and bringing the U.S. back to a prosperous nation. FDR's speech in New York City in 1936 left a very strong message to the world, saying, I should like to have it said of my first administration that in it the forces of selfishness and lust for power met their match. I should like to have it said of my second administration that in it, these forces are mastered (Freedman 1990, p. 194). Again, that ...
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  • George Washington And Benedict Arnold - 578 words
    George Washington And Benedict Arnold Washington and Arnold George Washington and Benedict Arnold began as compatriots fighting for the same cause at the beginning of the American Revolutionary War, also known as the American War of Independence. They were fighting to rid the original colonies from unjust British rule. However, one became the revered leader of a new nation and the other became everything that nation stood for. Washington became a human icon that became synonymous with the American nation and is remembered as the deliverer of the young American people. Arnold betrayed his country to the same aggressor the Americans were combating, completing the shift from patriot to traitor, ...
    Related: arnold, benedict, benedict arnold, george washington, british rule
  • In My Reading Of A Narrative Of The Life Of Mrs Mary Jemison, Written By James E Seaver And Edited By June Namias, I Discover - 1,688 words
    In my reading of A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison, written by James E. Seaver and edited by June Namias, I discovered many things I did not know about not only the Seneca Indians, but also the other Iroquois tribes within upstate New York. I enjoyed the perspective this book gives the reader. The story is told from someone that was introduced to the Indians, not as an original member of the tribe, but from someone that was captured by these Indians at an early age and assimilated into their culture. It serves as a direct source of information from a person that was taught everything about being an Indian. The information comes from someone that wasnt born into the culture, and I ...
    Related: discover, mary, narrative, last days, indian nations
  • In Struggling To Determine Whether Or Not The American Political System Is Pluralistic, Elitist, Or A Representative Democrac - 1,802 words
    In struggling to determine whether or not the American political system is pluralistic, elitist, or a representative democracy one must first understand what these systems are. A pluralistic system of government focuses upon interest groups to convey the interests and views of public opinion. An elitist system focuses upon a small "elite" class to rule. Representative government relies upon the voting majority of citizens to reflect whos best to rule. The representative system of democracy was the intentional method of government initiated by the Founding Fathers (Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Ben Franklin). They saw this as the antithesis of the Eng ...
    Related: american, american government, american nation, american political, american revolution, american system, political parties
  • Jews In Argentina - 1,210 words
    Jews In Argentina The Jewish Community of Argentina Argentina is the second largest nation in Lain America and boasts the largest Jewish community in the region (200,000 of its 35 million people). From an open door policy of immigration to the harboring of Nazi war criminals, Argentina's Jews have faced period of peaceful coexistence and periods of intense anti-Semitism. Argentina's Jews have numerous Jewish community organizations. The DIAI (Delegacion de Asociaciones Israelitas Argentinas) was founded in 1939 as the political arm of the Jewish community. The DIAI protects Jewish rights and represents the community in the government. Another organization, the AMIA, an Ashkenazic mutual-aid ...
    Related: argentina, ashkenazi jews, jews, russian jews, sephardic jews
  • John Quincy Adams - 1,564 words
    John Quincy Adams John Quincy Adams was the only son of a president to become president. He had an impressive political background that began at the age of fourteen. He was an intelligent and industrious individual. He was a man of strong character and high principles. By all account, his presidency should have been a huge success, yet it wasn't. John Quincy Adams' presidency was frustrating and judged a failure because of the scandal, attached to his election, the pettiness of his political rivals, and his strong character. John Quincy Adams was born on July 1767, in Braintree Massachusetts. His parents were John and Abigail Adams. Quincy, had every advantage as a youngster. At the time of ...
    Related: abigail adams, john quincy adams, quincy, quincy adams, federalist party
  • Kennedy - 1,012 words
    ... iderable success. Congress passed a bill increasing minimum wage, and Congress passed his bill to create the Peace Corps. Which was an agency to perform social and humanitarian services overseas. The program's goal was to create peace and friendship with nations. Within two years the Peace Corps were working in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Kennedy ran into some problems after the conservative Republicans joined with the Southern Democrats to stop legislation they didn't like. A Medicare bill, a civil rights bill, and a bill to create a Cabinet-level Department of Urban Affairs were all defeated8. Kennedy didn't lose all of his approval because he get some of his bills passed. Congres ...
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  • Progressivism Movement - 1,885 words
    Progressivism Movement Progressivism implies a philosophy which welcomes innovations and reforms in the political, economic, and social order. The Progressive movement, 1901 to 1917, was ultimately the triumph of conservatism rather than a victory for liberalism. In a general sense, the conservative goals of this period justified the Liberal reforms enacted by Progressive leaders. Deviating from the traditional definition of conservatism (a resistance to change and a disposition of hostility to innovations in the political, social, and economic order), the Conservatist triumph was in the sense that there was an effort to maintain basic social and economic relations vital to a capitalist soci ...
    Related: progressive movement, progressivism, federal reserve, work force, chief
  • Race Relations In The Us - 1,331 words
    ... the logs in leather straps attached to their shoulders. They plowed using mule and ox teams. They dug ditches, spread manure, and piled coarse fodder with their bare hands. They built and cleaned Southern roads, helped construct Southern railroads, and, of course, they picked cotton. In short, slave women were used as badly as men, and were treated by Southern whites as if they were anything but self-respecting women. From the black women who were even partially literate, hundreds of letters exist telling of the atrocities inflicted by "massa." Both physical and sexual assaults on black women were common at the turn of the century. Nothing I have read captures the true devastation to the ...
    Related: black race, race relations, toni morrison, york press, cotton
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