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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: falls short

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  • Anarchy - 1,144 words
    Anarchy Anarchy is seen as one end of the spectrum whose other end is marked by the presence of a legitimate and competent government. International politics is described as being spotted with pieces of government and bound with elements of community. Traditionally, international-political systems are thought of as being more or less anarchic. Anarchy is taken to mean not just the absence of government but also the presence of disorder and chaos. Although far from peaceful, international politics falls short of unrelieved chaos, and while not formally organized, it is not entirely without institutions and orderly procedures. Although it is misleading to label modern international politics as ...
    Related: anarchy, foreign direct, world government, human rights, interdependence
  • Ancient Egypt - 1,076 words
    Ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt The term culture is one that can be defined in many ways. Culture is defined as: the ideas, activities, and ways of behaving that are special to a country, people, or region. Museums such as the Field Museum attempt to give its visitors a sense of the culture and history of different countries, as well as a sense of US culture and history. In this quest however, museums often focus on one specific nature of the culture [of a country] and lose sight of the whole picture - the entire culture. After all, the US culture is primarily a capitalistic one, and museums - in addition to their quest to educate the American public - overemphasize what they feel is the most in ...
    Related: ancient egypt, ancient egyptians, egypt, egyptian culture, different countries
  • Attacks On The Insanity Defense The Insanity Defense Refers To That Branch Of The Concept Of Insanity Which Defines The Exten - 1,858 words
    ATTACKS ON THE INSANITY DEFENSE The insanity defense refers to that branch of the concept of insanity which defines the extent to which men accused of crimes may be relieved of criminal responsibility by virtue of mental disease. The terms of such a defense are to be found in the instructions presented by the trial judge to the jury at the close of a case. These instructions can be drawn from any of several rules used in the determination of mental illness. The final determination of mental illness rests solely on the jury who uses information drawn from the testimony of "expert" witnesses, usually professionals in the field of psychology. The net result of such a determination places an ind ...
    Related: branch, insanity, insanity defense, major problem, legal definition
  • Beyond The Problem Of Evil - 3,996 words
    Beyond The Problem Of Evil evil Beyond the Problem of Evil Introduction: The problem of evil is, in my opinion, the best point of departure for a fruitful dialogue between Christianity, traditionally conceived, and those strands of modern philosophy which have been perceived--indeed, have sometimes perceived themselves--as a threat to that tradition. As such, I will attempt first, to outline the problem of evil in the starkest terms possible, presenting Augustine's approach to its solution followed by a critical analysis; second, to present an alternative approach to the questions which give rise to the problem--an approach derived in large part from Spinoza and Nietzsche; and, third, to sho ...
    Related: good and evil, falls short, human experience, free choice, referring
  • College Sports - 1,270 words
    College Sports Brad Wilson Women Studies 4 page paper 10/13/00 We live in a republic governed not just by majority rule but also by law. We use law in our country to limit the power of majority rule. The basic reason that we do this is because society can be flawed. This flaw can come from a variety of areas, but the one that I would like to focus on is sexism. In criminal law the courts are blind to the ideas that people are different. Every person is given the same privileges and limitations as the next person regardless of sex or race. We do not live in a system were there is a set of rules for men and a different set of rules for women. The application of these laws can be flawed however ...
    Related: college sports, sports, rodney king, criminal trial, brad
  • Compare The Awakening To Madame Bovary - 1,203 words
    Compare The Awakening to Madame Bovary Kate Chopin's The Awakening and Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary are both tales of women indignant with their domestic situations; the distinct differences between the two books can be found in the authors' unique tones. Both authors weave similar themes into their writings such as, the escape from the monotony of domestic life, dissatisfaction with marital expectations and suicide. References to "fate" abound throughout both works. In The Awakening, Chopin uses fate to represent the expectations of Edna Pontellier's aristocratic society. Flaubert uses "fate" to portray his characters' compulsive methods of dealing with their guilt and rejecting of pers ...
    Related: awakening, bovary, compare, emma bovary, madame, madame bovary, the awakening
  • Computer Intellect - 1,090 words
    ... g to Searle, it has this mind because its brain is complex enough, or in his terms, there is enough water to make it wet (DesAutels Lecture 6-14-00). I would now like to ask, did that bacterial cell have a mind, the one we started with? NO. Did the slug have a mind? NO, it too lacked a brain. Do the cells in a human have a mind? Remember they themselves have no brains, so they cant have mind, but collected together as a whole they do, and the human is attributed with mind. So the question still remains, Can a computer have a mind? It is made up of parts, like the cells that make up a human, and these parts on their own lack mind (like the cogs in a clock. Just as an aside, the clock that ...
    Related: intellect, falls short, technology industry, philosophy of mind, nagel
  • David Hume - 2,175 words
    David Hume "I was from the beginning scandalised, I must own, with this resemblance between the Deity and human creatures." --Philo David Hume wrote much about the subject of religion, much of it negative. In this paper we shall attempt to follow Hume's arguments against Deism as Someone knowable from the wake He allegedly makes as He passes. This kind of Deism he lays to rest. Then, digging deeper, we shall try our hand at a critique of his critique of religion, of resurrecting a natural belief in God. Finally, if there's anything Hume would like to say as a final rejoinder, we shall let him have his last word and call the matter closed. To allege the occurrence of order in creation, purpos ...
    Related: david, david hume, hume, philosophy of religion, present state
  • Democracy - 758 words
    Democracy George Bernard Shaw once said: "Democracy substitutes election by the incompetent many incompetent many for appointment by the corrupt few...", and while I don't have nearly such a bleak outlook on our method of government, Mr. Shaw does hold an iota of truth in his quotation. In a perfect world, where everyone is informed, intelligent, and aware of their system of administration, democracy would work perfectly. In a world where there are different personalities, dissimilar concerns and divergent points of view, democracy falls short of the ideal of having all people being equal. Similarly, having a Philosopher-King or an equivalent in control of a country sounds fine on paper, but ...
    Related: democracy, power over, george bernard shaw, paying attention, monarch
  • Emma - 1,189 words
    Emma Of Jane Austen Jane Austens Emma and the Romantic Imagination "To see a world in a grain of sand And a heaven in a wild flower Hold infinity in the palm of your hand And eternity in an hour." William Blake, Auguries of Innocence Imagination, to the people of the eighteenth century of whom William Blake and Jane Austen are but two, involves the twisting of the relationship between fantasy and reality to arrive at a fantastical point at which a world can be extrapolated from a single grain of sand, and all the time that has been and ever will be can be compressed into the space of an hour. What is proposed by Blake is clearly ludicrousit runs against the very tide of reason and senseand y ...
    Related: emma, emma woodhouse, eighteenth century, oxford university press, hume
  • Fairy Tale Conventions And Great Expectations - 1,122 words
    Fairy Tale Conventions And Great Expectations (Hainstock 1) Great Expectations and Fairy tales Tolkien describes the facets which are necessary in a good fairy tales as fantasy, recovery, escape, and consolation - recovery from deep despair, escape from some great danger, but most of all, consolation. Speak- ing of the happy ending,all complete fairy stories must have itHowever fantastic or terrible the adventure, it can give to child or man that hears it,a catch of breath, a beat and lifting of the heart near to tears. (Uses of Enchantment, pg.143) Great Expectations shares many of the conventions of fairy tales. The one dimensional characters, the use of repetition, and the evil women seem ...
    Related: fairy, fairy tale, great expectations, tale, middle class
  • Globalization - 1,173 words
    ... sempowered himself or herself even if he or she attains a short-term objective. Power originates in the individual; authority originates in the charter of the organization. Thus, there is no such thing as position power. Power can be exerted anywhere, whereas authority is limited by position. (I can tell my team member what to do, but I cannot tell your team member what to do.) Finally, although one's power cannot be affected by anyone else, one's authority can be increased or decreased by someone who holds a position of higher authority. Leadership. Leadership can be defined as the art of getting people to perform a task willingly. It differs from power in that it focuses solely on comp ...
    Related: globalization, influence people, coercive power, team member, effectiveness
  • God Existence - 1,437 words
    God Existence In David Humes Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, Cleanthes argument from design is successful in supporting the idea that the universe has an ordered arrangement and pattern. This argument is not sound in its ability to prove the existence of the Christian God. However, Cleanthes does present a sound case for order in the universe, which can be seen as an aspect of ones faith in a Supreme Creator. In the argument from design, Cleanthes is attempting to discover and defend the basic foundations of religion by using the same methods applied in scientific thought. Paramount in the process of scientific thought is reliance on previous observation and experience of certain caus ...
    Related: existence of god, natural religion, falls short, subject matter, relative
  • Hume - 2,176 words
    Hume "I was from the beginning scandalised, I must own, with this resemblance between the Deity and human creatures." --Philo David Hume wrote much about the subject of religion, much of it negative. In this paper we shall attempt to follow Hume's arguments against Deism as Someone knowable from the wake He allegedly makes as He passes. This kind of Deism he lays to rest. Then, digging deeper, we shall try our hand at a critique of his critique of religion, of resurrecting a natural belief in God. Finally, if there's anything Hume would like to say as a final rejoinder, we shall let him have his last word and call the matter closed. To allege the occurrence of order in creation, purpose in i ...
    Related: david hume, hume, natural religion, empirical study, refer
  • Hume - 2,176 words
    Hume "I was from the beginning scandalised, I must own, with this resemblance between the Deity and human creatures." --Philo David Hume wrote much about the subject of religion, much of it negative. In this paper we shall attempt to follow Hume's arguments against Deism as Someone knowable from the wake He allegedly makes as He passes. This kind of Deism he lays to rest. Then, digging deeper, we shall try our hand at a critique of his critique of religion, of resurrecting a natural belief in God. Finally, if there's anything Hume would like to say as a final rejoinder, we shall let him have his last word and call the matter closed. To allege the occurrence of order in creation, purpose in i ...
    Related: david hume, hume, design argument, present state, remove
  • Hume - 2,176 words
    Hume "I was from the beginning scandalised, I must own, with this resemblance between the Deity and human creatures." --Philo David Hume wrote much about the subject of religion, much of it negative. In this paper we shall attempt to follow Hume's arguments against Deism as Someone knowable from the wake He allegedly makes as He passes. This kind of Deism he lays to rest. Then, digging deeper, we shall try our hand at a critique of his critique of religion, of resurrecting a natural belief in God. Finally, if there's anything Hume would like to say as a final rejoinder, we shall let him have his last word and call the matter closed. To allege the occurrence of order in creation, purpose in i ...
    Related: david hume, hume, last word, human nature, occurrence
  • In The Creation - 1,732 words
    In The Creation How often has it been that you create a New Years resolution, only to end up breaking it within a month? Did you know that only 1 out of 10 people in the United States actually follow through with their New Years resolution, and that this can probably be attributed to poor goal setting? Fact: Personal goals are supposed to be the easiest to follow through on. So how do you set goals properly in order to reach an achievement? And if personal goals are the easiest to follow through with, how do major corporations, which set insane goals yearly (like doubling profits) almost always manage to reach their targets, which can require organizing the achievements of hundreds or even t ...
    Related: political science, human interaction, task performance, clarity, absolute
  • Insomnia - 381 words
    Insomnia Insomnia is a sleeping disorder enabling people to fall asleep. It is a relatively common disorder that can affect people of all ages for varying amounts of time. Usually its effects last for only a few nights, but it is possible for the symptoms to continue for months and even years. It can be caused by several factors like psychiatric problems, persistent stress, use of stimulants or alcohol, a lack of exercise, excessive noise or light, and certain physical illnesses. Insomnia is not defined by the number of hours of sleep a person gets or how long it takes to fall asleep. Individuals vary normally in their need for, and their satisfaction with, sleep. Insomnia may cause problems ...
    Related: insomnia, short term, falls short, sleep disorders, illness
  • International Competition - 1,060 words
    International Competition Consumer Behaviour Consumers have so many choices to make compared to ten or even twenty years ago. Today as always, business growth depends heavily on loyal customers who return because they are satisfied with the product and/or service they have received. But first companies have to bring consumers into the stores. The companies bring consumers into the store by marketing their product. The average consumer would probably define marketing as a combination of advertising and selling. It actually includes a good deal more. Modern marketing is most simply defined as directing the flow of goods from producers to customers. In order to answer this question fully we mus ...
    Related: international competition, market research, consumer goods, important role, abroad
  • Kodak - 1,342 words
    ... tography. However, Kodak missed this opportunity in their haste to get into the digital camera market. Issue #2 - Continued revenue losses in the digital imaging division Here, the issue is Kodak's continuing revenue losses in its digital imaging division. Again, one of the chief culprits is Kodak's failure to introduce digitization before digital cameras. As a result, Kodak has to grow two new products, digital cameras and digitization. This is a tremendous burden on Kodak's financial resources. Additionally, Kodak did not effectively target or segment its market. Granted, Kodak and Intel did hundreds of one-on-one interviews and test marketing to develop and fine-tune advertisements. H ...
    Related: kodak, strategic plan, action plan, computer industry, losses
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