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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: extended metaphor

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  • Wordsworth Begins His Extended Metaphor In The Third Line Of The Poem, With His Speaker Saying, I Saw A Crowd, A Host, Of Gol - 331 words
    Wordsworth begins his extended metaphor in the third line of the poem, with his speaker saying, "I saw a crowd, / a host, of golden daffodils" that were "fluttering and dancing in the breeze." (line 6). The speaker is attributing to these daffodils human qualities: their forming a crowd, and their dancing. That the speaker has "wandered lonely as a cloud" (1) introduces the speaker as one content to be apart from other people. The speaker admits that he enjoys his being apart from other men when he speaks of himself as a peaceful cloud that "floats on high oer vales and hills" (1). The image of a cloud floating is tranquil, and suggests that the speaker is pleased to be drifting alone. The s ...
    Related: extended metaphor, metaphor, speaker, wordsworth, the narrator
  • Bryant Vs Dickinson - 1,367 words
    Bryant Vs Dickinson Emily Dickinson presents death in the poem "Because I Could Not Stop for Death" through the use of personification and the use of extended metaphor. William Cullen Bryant presents death through the use of the analogies in the poem "Thanatopsis." Although each poet presents death differently, the meanings are similar. In "Thanatopsis, " Bryant influences the reader to accept death as all living things' fate. Bryant explains death by nature's laws and the fact that nature's creatures must abide by these laws. In lines 26-28, Bryant explains how an individual must abide by these laws and surrender to the earth that nourished the living. "To be a brother to the insensible roc ...
    Related: bryant, cullen bryant, dickinson, emily dickinson, william cullen bryant
  • C S Lewis - 994 words
    C. S. Lewis C. S. Lewis, a well-known author and apologist, is best known by people of all ages for his seven volume series entitled The Chronicles of Narnia. As Lewis wrote about the land of Narnia, an imaginary world visited by children of this world, he had two obvious purposes: to entertain the readers and to suggest analogies of the Christian faith. Although some feel that his stories are violent, Lewis is successful at using fiction to open peoples hearts to accepting Christ as their Savior because he first entertains the audience with a wonderful story. Lewis talked about how he came to write the books of Narnia, saying that they "all began with a picture of a Faun carrying an umbrell ...
    Related: c. s. lewis, lewis, literary critic, new jersey, cornell
  • Essayist Art - 864 words
    Essayist Art Sounds Personification "Commerce is unexpectedly confident and serene, alert, adventurous and unwearied." (84) Through the personification of commerce Thoreau is able to show that commerce fluctuates in the same manner as humanity. The adjectives he uses to describe commerce show that commerce has some of the same tendencies as humans, and Thoreau believes that it is these tendencies that make commerce so successful. Chapter 5: Solitude Allusion "who keeps himself more secret than ever did Goffe or Whalley." (96) Thoreau is making a historical allusion to William Goffe and Edward Whalley who were English regicides during the English civil war. They were signers of the death warr ...
    Related: essayist, charles i, mind and body, more important, suggestion
  • It Is Hard To Sympathize With Someone When You Have No Idea Where They Are Coming From Or What They Are Going Through It Is S - 1,007 words
    It is hard to sympathize with someone when you have no idea where they are coming from or what they are going through. It is similar experiences that allow us to extend our sincere appreciation and understanding for another human beings situations and trials of life. Anne Bradstreets "The Author to Her Book" expresses the emotions that Bradstreet felt when her most intimate thoughts were published to the world without her consent. The average person would not see the cause for distress that Bradstreet feels in this situation. She had written a collection of near perfect poetry, which expressed her feelings in a way that the majority of women during that time did not have the talent or traini ...
    Related: human beings, extended metaphor, proud, ironically
  • Lady Lazarus By Sylvia Plath - 450 words
    Lady Lazarus By Sylvia Plath Sylvia Plath uses a diverse array of stylistic devices in "Lady Lazarus," among them allusion, apostrophe, extended metaphor, and irony, in order to develop the speaker as a character. Those three poetic devices are particularly evident in lines 65-79 of"Lady Lazarus." In the New Testament of the Bible, Lazarus is a man who rises from the dead at the command of Jesus Christ (John 11:38). The title of this poem, "Lady Lazarus"(the "Lady" without a doubt referring to Plath herself, as this is an example of confessional poetry; the "Lazarus" being an allusion to the biblical figure) is an accurate indicator of the content of the poem. "Lady Lazarus" is about Plath's ...
    Related: lazarus, plath, sylvia, sylvia plath, jesus christ
  • Lifeboar Ethics - 1,036 words
    Lifeboar Ethics Garrett Hardins argument for the preservation of well-to-do societies is embodied by his extended metaphor of each society as a lifeboat with its members the lifeboats occupants. His presentation of this metaphor is key in his assertions that the creation of an international food bank, efforts to improve agriculture in foreign nations (the Green Revolution), and lax immigration laws will all result in universal tragedy. Hardins initial complaint is against humanitarian efforts to establish an international food bank, to which rich nations will contribute and from which poor nations will draw. Theoretically, accidents (famine, crop failure, etc.) should teach nations to plan a ...
    Related: ethics, world today, poor countries, green revolution, guilt
  • Othello - 877 words
    Othello "Friends" A friendship is not always what it is made out to be. Sometimes, the perceived level of security a friendship gives is false. This 'false friendship' is portrayed explicitly in William Shakespeare's "Othello." Superficially, Roderigo and Iago are friends. In reality, Iago is using Roderigo to seek revenge on Othello and they are in fact, not friends. Iago's jealousy of power and love consumes him into using his apparent friend for his own personal gain. In these relationships, there is always a stronger person who uses a weaker person's need for a friend, to achieve their desired goals. It is evident just by looking at the amount of lines Iago has, that he is much stronger, ...
    Related: othello, extended metaphor, high school, william shakespeare, friendship
  • Sonnet 18 - 1,464 words
    Sonnet 18 William Shakespeares Sonnet 18 is one of one hundred fifty four poems of fourteen lines written in Iambic Pentameter. These sonnets exclusively employ the rhyme scheme, which has come to be called the Shakespearean Sonnet. The sonnets are composed of an octet and sestet and typically progress through three quatrains to a concluding couplet. It also contains figurative language and different poetic devices used to create unique effects in his sonnets. Shakespeares sonnets consist of words constructed in a certain manner or form, thoughts, emotion and poetic devices. One way to interpret the sonnet is to think of "thee" that Shakespeare is referring to as a person. Following that lin ...
    Related: sonnet, sonnet shakespeare, extended metaphor, figurative language, temperature
  • Stephane Mallarme - 1,323 words
    Stephane Mallarme Stphane Mallarm, a French poet, became one of the most important masters of French symbolism, a nineteenth-century movement in poetry that stressed impressions and moods rather than descriptions of reality (Online). The poetry of Charles Baudelaire, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine, and others strongly affected Mallarms writing (Online). He used symbolism to represent human emotions to make his poems unclear, thus avoiding direct communication with his readers (Online & World Book 110,111). Mallarm was born in Paris on March 18, 1842 (Online). After his mother died when he was seven years old, his grandmother became his parental role model. His education included upper-class b ...
    Related: upper class, edgar allan, encyclopedia americana, arthur, twentieth-century
  • Symbolism In Young Goodman Brown - 1,739 words
    Symbolism In Young Goodman Brown Nathaniel Hawthorne's work is typically fraught with symbolism, much of it deriving from his Puritan ancestry; a great-great uncle was actually a judge in the Salem witchcraft trials (Roth 76). Not surprisingly, Hawthorne was obsessed with the twin themes of sin and guilt. Author John Roth notes that A number of recurring thematic patterns and character types appear in Hawthorne's novels and tales. These repetitions show Hawthorne's emphasis on the effects of events on the human heart rather than the events themselves (76). Because he is speaking of what we later would come to call the unconscious, Hawthorne extensively employed the use of symbolism, which by ...
    Related: brown, goodman, goodman brown, symbolism, young goodman, young goodman brown
  • The Author To Her Book By Anne Bradstreet - 771 words
    The Author To Her Book By Anne Bradstreet Not Just a Wife Anne Bradstreet was America's first noteworthy poet in spite of the fact that she was a woman. Both the daughter and wife of Massachusetts governors, Bradstreet suffered all of the hardships of colonial life, was a mother, and still found time to write. Her poem, "The Author to Her Book," is an example of Bradstreet's excellent use of literary techniques while expressing genuine emotion and using domestic subject matter. Because her father was a studious man, Bradstreet was able to receive a good education and was well read. She enjoyed serious and religious writings and admired many of the great poets of the time, among these Sir Phi ...
    Related: anne, anne bradstreet, bradstreet, edmund spenser, second edition
  • We Wear The Mask - 629 words
    We Wear The Mask Analysis of We Wear the Mask In one of Paul Lawrence Dunbars most famous poems We Wear the Mask, he describes the harsh reality of the black race in America and how they hide their grief, sadness, and broken hearts under a mask for a survival strategy towards whites. We wear the mask that grins and lies, It hides our cheeks and shades our eyes, This debt we pay to human guile; With torn and bleeding hearts we smile, And mouth with myriad subtleties. In the first verse, the mask is taken off. The We of the poem describes the black community that lives a double life, the masked and the unmasked. Dunbar included the word mask in his poem because historically it was a false dece ...
    Related: mask, wear, black community, extended metaphor, strategy
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