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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american journal

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  • Fidler, Jr, Zechmeister, Eb, Shuaghnessy, Jj 1988 Memory For Frequency Of Hearing Popular Songs American Journal Of Psycholog - 548 words
    Fidler, J.R., Zechmeister, E.B., & shuaghnessy, J.J. (1988). Memory for frequency of hearing popular songs. American Journal of Psychology, 101, 3149. "Remember that song we heard the other day? What was it called? I wish I could remember." If this has ever happened to you please listen carefully to what I have to say. The following journal article looks into the question; does frequency correlate with familiarity for the remembrance of songs. The hypothesis was, specifically; people with a high knowledge of certain stimulus area should be able to identify frequency patterns more often than those who had little knowledge of the area. The findings could be used to determine whether or not peo ...
    Related: american, american journal, frequency, hearing, journal, journal article, songs
  • A Review Of The Eat More Weigh Less Hawaii Diet - 645 words
    A Review Of The Eat More Weigh Less Hawaii Diet A Review of The Eat More, Weigh Less, Hawaii Diet The Eat More, Weigh Less, Hawaii Diet claims that you can eat all the food you want, never have that feeling of hunger, still lose weight, and be healthier than you ever have been simply by eating the traditional foods of Hawaiians. The Eat More, Weigh Less, Hawaii Diet was developed by Dr. Shintani at the Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center in Hawaii. He treated native Hawaiians with diseases such as obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and other serious diseases, by merely altering their diets to traditional Hawaiian food instead of the junk food they had been consuming. In only three wee ...
    Related: diet, hawaii, lose weight, american journal, journal
  • A Sick Man's Precious Life - 1,043 words
    A Sick Man'S Precious Life Technology has been a part of everyone's life. It can be found everywhere, in homes, in education and even in the field of medicine. Technology lead to the further development of healing and curing. Because of it, doctors can cure patients more easily and effectively. However, technology is not always an advantage. It has brought several unacceptable ideas, one of which is the ending of a suffering patient's life. This is more popularly known as euthanasia. Euthanasia, from its Greek origin meaning easy death or dying well, is an action or omission which of itself or by intention caused death in order that all suffering may be eliminated. Euthanasia is more than ki ...
    Related: human life, precious, quality of life, holy book, nazi germany
  • Acrophobia - 1,137 words
    Acrophobia Treating Acrophobia 2 Treating Acrophobia GRADE-90 Wood (1999) describes a person suffering from a phobia experiences a persistent, irrational fear of some specific object, situation, or activity that poses no real danger (or whose danger is blown all out of proportion). Agoraphobia, social phobia, and specific phobia are three classes of phobia. Agoraphobics have an intense fear of being in a situation from which immediate escape is not possible or in which help would not be available If the person should become overwhelmed by anxiety or experience a panic attack or panic-like symptoms. People who suffer from social phobia are intensely afraid of any social or performance situati ...
    Related: college students, virtual reality, popular science, phobia, tall
  • Active Euthenasia A Kantian Perspective - 1,259 words
    Active Euthenasia - A Kantian Perspective Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Active Euthenasia - A Kantian Perspective Euthanasia is one of society's more widely, and hotly debated moral issues of our time. More directly, active euthanasia, which by definition, is; "Doing something, such as administering a lethal drug, or using other means that cause a person's death."1 Passive euthanasia, defined as; "Stopping (or not starting) some treatment, which allows a person to die, the person's condition causes his or her death,"2 seems not to be as debated, perhaps not as recognized, as it's counterpart. I have chosen to look more closely at the issue of active euthanasia, ...
    Related: active euthanasia, kantian, concise oxford dictionary, health care, personally
  • Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood - 1,468 words
    Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood Running Head: ADJUSTMENT DISORDER WITH DEPRESSED MOOD CAUSE Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, Cause and Affect Abstract Research was conducted to investigate Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, and some causes, affects, and treatment approaches. Not all individuals manifest or demonstrate the same depressive symptoms, which can make it difficult for clinicians to diagnose and treat. The American Psychiatric Association has categorized various depressive disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV, 1994). Researchers have investigated the validity of the DSM diagnostic criteria over the year ...
    Related: adjustment, depressed, disorder, mood, treating depression
  • Adoption And Identity Formation - 994 words
    ... y, the adopted child must struggle with the competing and conflictual issues of good and bad parents, good and bad self, and separation from both adoptive parents and images of biological parents. If all adoptions were open, the adoptee would have the ability to know about the traits of each family. He would have an easier task of forming an identity for himself, rather than struggling with the issues of to whom he can relate. If the adolescent has some information about his birth parents, such as ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and religion, Horner and Rosenberg (1991) believe that the following can happen: From the bits of fact that they possess, adopted children develop and elaborate ...
    Related: adoption, formation, identity formation, life cycle, family life
  • Alcohol Related Deaths - 1,125 words
    Alcohol Related Deaths More than 100,000 deaths per year are attributed to alcohol, in the United States. Alcohol-related auto accidents account for approximately 24,000 of these deaths (most often the victims are under 30 years of age), while alcohol-related homicide account for 11,000 and suicide 8,000 deaths. Certain types of cancer, which are partly associated with the consumption of alcohol, contribute to another 17,000 deaths. Alcohol-related strokes are responsible for 9,000 deaths. 25,000 lost lives are due to 12 alcohol-related diseases including cirrhosis of the liver. All these deaths combined are the equivalent of 200 jumbo jetliners crashing and taking the lives of everyone onbo ...
    Related: alcohol, american journal, vitamin c, nobel prize, liver
  • And Media Effect - 1,265 words
    ... on discovered that female athletes have been underrepresented in the media for quite some time. Studies show that only %15 of coverage in newspapers and %5 of television air time has been given to covering female athletes. (Fink 1998) These experiments and surveys correlate with another experiment conducted by John Steel, "A survey has indicated that around two-thirds of young people base their moral judgements on how a decision made them feel and whether it helped them succeed. Electronic media support these views and increase the importance of self" (Steel 1997). The on-campus experiment contained statistical questions that pertained to situations that people may have learned about on ...
    Related: electronic media, mass media, media, media coverage, media research, media studies
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,681 words
    ... lar were also found more likely to be asexual (defined as having a lack of interest in sex for a year prior to assessment). This is also a common finding in females (Carlat, 1997; Murnen, 1997). With anorexia, it is thought to be to due to the testosterone lowering effect of protein-calorie malnutrition, combined with active repression of sexual desire (Carlat, 1997). The high rate of homosexuality and bisexuality among males with eating disorders can serve as evidence for both psychosocial and biological views of the etiology of eating disorders. Psychosocially, homosexuality can be seen as a risk factor that puts males in a subculture system that places the same importance on looks and ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, sexual desire, sexual orientation
  • Business Research - 1,523 words
    ... s to the answers. Newsom sites an example of an organization trying to determine where employer bias might play in the event of employment discrimination by asking a the following question: If you had two applicants absolutely equal in terms of educational background and experience, and one was a woman or a member of a minority race, or both, which would you hire? The answer is then interpreted and depending on the employers response, the interviewer is open to several lines of questioning. Adversely, personal interviews can also lead a company down the wrong path. Kotler states that intercept interviews have the drawback of being non-probability samples, and the interviews must be quite ...
    Related: business journal, business research, research techniques, financial risk, cost analysis
  • Caoital Punishment - 1,005 words
    Caoital Punishment Throughout the semester, I have studied many social issues in light of philosophy. One of these highly controversial social issues deals with the subject of capital punishment. It is unfortunate, but our society has evolved to the point where capital punishment has become a necessary function of modern society. Simply stated, capital punishment is the execution of criminals, for committing crimes, which are regarded as so heinous, that the only acceptable punishment is permanent removal from the society in which they could not conform. One of the most controversial issues argued when considering capital punishment involves determining whether the execution of our fellow ma ...
    Related: capital punishment, punishment, human nature, more important, objective
  • Color Effects - 1,329 words
    ... ice. Low screeners reported more disphoria then high screeners in the rooms with a red color scheme. Low screeners also reported more disphoria in the white walled room. This was explained by that low screeners can not ignore the starkness of the white pigment while high screeners can. The goals of this study are to find out what testing conditions are best for low screeners and high screeners. The hypothesis for this study is that low screeners will have higher test scores in the blue room then the high screeners. In the white control room and the red room the high screeners will have higher test scores because they need more stimulation in their environment for optimal performance. Low ...
    Related: american journal, applied psychology, average household, credit, debriefing
  • Comparing The Daily Lives Of African American Women In The 1940s And Today - 1,840 words
    ... acy arises in a racially conscious society where Black women and Black men are still struggling with how to present their physical image and still be accepted in the society. It is very complex trying to negotiate your self-acceptance through two opposing cultures. Advertising in the 1930s had an impact on how African Americans defined themselves, particularly African American women. It is still the same more than 60 years later (Brown & Lieberson, 2000). Advertisers have successfully exploited the self-image of Black men and women. To be Black, especially if you were particularly dark, was loaded with negative stereotypes. Several products, promising miraculous transformations, were man ...
    Related: african, african american, afro american, american, american history, american journal, american life
  • Concentrations On Maximal Exercise Capacity Or Ventilation In Stable Heart Failure - 757 words
    Concentrations On Maximal Exercise Capacity Or Ventilation In Stable Heart Failure Critical Inquiry 10/31/00 The goal of the article, (Lack of Effect of Increased Inspired Oxygen Concentrations on Maximal Exercise Capacity or Ventilation in Stable Heart Failure. The American Journal of Cardiology, 84(12), Dec.15, 99. pp 1412-1416.) is to further study the effects of administration of increased inspired oxygen concentrations on maximal exercise capacity and exercise ventilation in heart failure. Recent uncontrolled studies have suggested improvement on maximal exercise capacity and a decreased exercise ventilation. This study used 21% as normal and 60% as increased inspired oxygen concentrati ...
    Related: capacity, exercise, heart association, heart failure, stable, ventilation
  • Creatine - 1,075 words
    ... tating effect (Phillips 15)." 1.) "By volumizing your cells to hold more resources then normal(15)." 2.) "Create a drug like effect on cellular processes(15)." With this scenario, the dietary supplement can exert a positive effect on muscle metabolism and/or performance. The third theory and most important relating to my paper states that a supplement might help you build muscle, enhance athlete performance and improve your health by simply making up for the deficiency. This has basically been what most dieticians, nutritionists, doctors, etc. have viewed supplements as a means of protecting your body against vitamin and mineral deficiencies and so on. Supplements have been widely used f ...
    Related: creatine, england journal, university studies, improved performance, cycle
  • Depression And Suicide In Adolescents - 1,126 words
    Depression And Suicide In Adolescents Depression and Suicide In Adolescents. As a state of extreme grief and all-encompassing sadness, depression, if left untreated, may lead to a deliberate murder of oneself, suicide. Depression effects individuals with out discriminating against race, gender, or age, yet among adolescents, the incidents of depression have increased significantly. Such increase is the potential cause of the rise of suicide rates amidst adolescents. Therefore it is imperative to treat depression before attempts of suicide are made, for if neglected, such attempts could become successful. Through out the years, adolescence has been regarded as the most confusing and difficult ...
    Related: depression inventory, suicide, suicide rates, social interaction, american medical
  • Dissociative Identity Disorder And Abuse - 1,125 words
    Dissociative Identity Disorder And Abuse The condition once known as multiple personality disorder (MPD) is a very real psychological phenomenon that until recently was mis-understood and often mis-diagnosed. Dissociative identity disorder, DID, as we now call it, is a mental illness where a person's thoughts, feelings, and memories are scattered throughout two or more separate personalities within the victims mind (Appelbaum 107). In 1973 perhaps the world's most famous psychiatric patient ever, Sybil brought attention to what was until then a rare diagnoses. Sybil was ritually abused as a child and was later found to possess sixteen separate personalities, including women with English acce ...
    Related: abuse, child abuse, disorder, dissociative, dissociative disorders, dissociative identity, dissociative identity disorder
  • Divorce And Children - 1,631 words
    Divorce And Children Divorce: Effects on Children Divorce has become an unquestionable remedy for the miserably married. Currently, the United States has the highest divorce rate in the world. Every year in the US approximately one million children experience divorce which, is about one in every three children (Amato 21). The effects of divorce can be tremendously painful for both children and adults. Children of divorce are more likely to suffer from behavioral, social, academic, and psychological problems than children raised in two-parent families. The actual separation of the family will be the initial crisis that a child must deal with but many issues such as economic hardship, moving, ...
    Related: divorce, divorce and children, divorce rate, effects of divorce, parental divorce
  • Drinking Age - 1,000 words
    Drinking Age Drinking is a big problem that causes many teen-age deaths in the United States, however, many people still argue that the legal age for drinking should be reduced to eighteen. This issue has been brought up many times, but the law has not been changed since the change to twenty-one in 1980. States have become stricter about preventing under-age drinking, but teen-agers have no problem getting alcohol. There are many arguments in favor of changing the drinking age back to eighteen. The facts show that drinking alcohol is too large of a responsibility for an eighteen-year-old to handle. In 1980 the government raised the drinking age to twenty-one because the number of drunk drivi ...
    Related: drinking, drinking age, public health, graduate school, martin
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