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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: exclusionary

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  • Affirmative Action In Higher Education: A Solution To Structural Racism - 1,127 words
    ... once they get accepted. Minority families, in general, earn substantially less than White families in the United States. Thus, fewer families resources are available to provide exposure to as many learning experiences for minority children outside of school. Considering the general poorer quality of public secondary schools in minority neighborhoods, minority students would be less adequately prepared t score as high on college entrance tests as white students (White, Two Views of Standardized Testing, p.335). Yet, scholars seldom consider this when they debate the lower level of minority students performance on college entrance exams. Nevertheless, there are sufficient data available t ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, higher education, racism, structural
  • American Monopolies - 1,092 words
    American Monopolies According to Webster , to have a monopoly is to have exclusive ownership, possession, or control. The following essay is an examination of Microsoft in comparison to this definition and another commonly known monopoly, Standard Oil. Also attention will be given to the necessary role of and problems with monopolies. Competitive Market vs. Monopoly A competitive market consists of many buyers and sellers. Markets thrive because an equilibrium price is established through natural competition and no single buyer or seller can affect that price. Instead both buyer and seller must take the price given by the market based on the dynamics of supply and demand. This competition is ...
    Related: american, personal computer, trade commission, competitive market, marketing
  • Business Law - 1,059 words
    Business Law Final Exam 1. John owned a cat which wandered into his yard. John was charged with violating a local ordinance which read: "It shall be illegal to permits cows, horses, goats, or other animals to wander about in a yard that is not property fenced." The ordinance had been passed over fifty years ago when wandering animals destroyed neighbor's crops. Is John guilty of violating this ordinance? Using two techniques of statutory interpretation, discuss. 2.Suppose that Perry sues Davis on the theory that Davis is so ugly Perry suffers intense emotional distress in his presence. Davis thinks correctly that there is no rule of law allowing Perry to recover. What procedural device shoul ...
    Related: business law, decision making, contract law, nineteenth century, breach
  • Cubas Politics - 1,690 words
    Cuba`s Politics While the isle of Cuba was initially discovered on October 27, 1492 during one of Columbus first voyages, it wasnt actually claimed by Spain until the sixteenth century. However, its tumultuous beginnings as a Spanish sugar colony provides an insightful backdrop into the very essence of the countrys political and economic unrest. From its early revolutionary days to the insurrectional challenge of the Marxist-Leninist theories emerged the totalitarian regime under Fidel Castro in present day Cuba. Cuban colonial society was distinguished by the characteristics of colonial societies in general, namely a stratified, inegalitarian class system; a poorly differentiated agricultur ...
    Related: post cold, fidel castro, international community, mood, accelerated
  • Introduction - 1,328 words
    Introduction Western female thought through the centuries has identified the relationship between patriarchy and gender as crucial to the women's subordinate position. For two hundred years, patriarchy precluded women from having a legal or political identity and the legislation and attitudes supporting this provided the model for slavery. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries suffrage campaigners succeeded in securing some legal and political rights for women in the UK. By the middle of the 20th century, the emphasis had shifted from suffrage to social and economic equality in the public and private sphere and the women's movement that sprung up during the 1960s began to argue that wome ...
    Related: third wave, popular culture, male privilege, structures, rhetorical
  • Justice Whites Interpretation Of Tennessee State Law - 976 words
    Justice WhiteS Interpretation Of Tennessee State Law CONCURRING OPINION: We concur with Justice White's interpretation of Tennessee State law. However, we propose that more restrictive standards should be used by policemen when dealing with imminently dangerous circumstances. The necessity standard that White proposes for governing the use of lethal force strikes the right balance in regulating violence. He insists that the police act reasonably by evaluating whether the felon's interest in life outweighs the state's interest in seizing the felon by lethal force. Because we honor the supreme value of human life, lethal force should only be used when there is a reasonable belief that the felo ...
    Related: interpretation, tennessee, self defense, benefit analysis, unreasonable
  • Mapp Vs Ohio - 1,676 words
    Mapp vs. Ohio The Mapp Vs Ohio Supreme Court Case was a turning point in our nation's history. It changed our legal system by forming the exclusionary rule, which in turn changed the way prosecution of a criminal is performed. On May 23, 1957, three Cleveland police officers arrived at Dolly Mapps home. They had reason to believe that paraphernalia and a fugitive of a recent bombing had been hiding out there. The officers asked if they could search the home without a search warrant, with the advice of her attorney she refused. Three hours later, four more police officers arrived to the scene. They knocked on the door but Ms. Mapp did not respond immediately. The officers then forcibly entere ...
    Related: mapp, ohio, ohio supreme court, police officer, search warrant
  • Micro Soft The Split Of An Empire - 2,270 words
    Micro + Soft - The Split Of An Empire Micro + Soft - The Split of an Empire Kendra Phelps BUS 415.3 / Business Law Rob Goodwin July 5, 2000 Table of Contents I. Introduction: The Allegations and the Laws 3 II. Introduction: The Proof 4 III. Trial 5 Table 1 6 IV. The Proposal 8 V. Microsoft's Response 9 VI. The Foes and Their Thoughts 11 VII. Current Status and Discussion 12 VIII. Recommendations 15 References 18 Micro + Soft - The Split of an Empire Could the megalosaurus business that was conceived in 1975 really be split in two - or three? This is what U.S. District Court Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson has decreed in order to put a stop to the monopolistic shenanigans that Microsoft calls b ...
    Related: empire, micro, soft, split, small town
  • Micro Soft The Split Of An Empire - 2,374 words
    ... rosoft has proposed that all of the above restrictions remain in place for four years instead of the ten as requested by the government, stating that nothing in the record would justify such a long term for relief. In their filings made with the U.S. District Court with their own proposals, Microsoft asserted that Judge Jackson's previous findings did not warrant the extreme measure of dividing the company in two. In stark contrast to the relief sought in its complaint, the government seeks to rip apart the company that until recently had the largest market capitalization in the world - an extreme remedy not even hinted at in the government's complaint, stated one of Microsoft's last fil ...
    Related: empire, micro, soft, split, saddle river
  • Microsoft - 1,120 words
    Microsoft The current Microsoft antitrust case, still in progress as this review is being written, has been both hailed and condemned as the most important antitrust action of the coming century. Its potential significance has been compared to that of the Supreme Court's 1911 Standard Oil decision, which not only applied for the first time the trust-busting power latent in the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890 to break up John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil Company, but of at least equal importance enunciated the rule of reason on which judicial interpretation of the Sherman Act continues to be based. While none of this conference volume's contributors develops this comparison, readers may come a ...
    Related: microsoft, microsoft corporation, telecommunications services, marginal cost, facility
  • Microsoft Antitrust Issue - 1,273 words
    Microsoft Antitrust Issue English 11-3 Research Microsoft Antitrust Issue Introduction Once upon a time there were two boys named Ed and Ned. This story is a fairy tale, but one in which most people already know all of the facts. Ed was an eight-year-old who lived in a small town with his parents not far from the state capital. Ed's father was a smart lawyer. He knew most people in the town were poor, so he built a gym set that all the kids in the town could play on. It was such a good gym set and both it and Ed became so popular that he decided to start charging each person twenty-five cents a day to play on it. Ed became rich and even started making more money than his father. Soon, a new ...
    Related: antitrust, microsoft, microsoft internet explorer, supreme court, small town
  • Microsoft Antitrust Issue - 1,137 words
    ... nfinite number of times at marginal cost. In other words, the productive "capacity" of every piece of software, once written, is virtually infinite, even if its current sales are minimal (qtd. Rule, 3). Windows is very popular partly because it provides for thousands of Independent Software Vendors ("ISVs"). This is a valuable platform that simplifies the task of creating compatible applications. Also, millions of consumers have become familiar with the "look and feel" of Windows and have assembled libraries of Windows applications. These "externalities" insulate Microsoft from competition. An example of this is the way Microsoft unfairly grabbed for Internet-browsing software with Ameri ...
    Related: antitrust, microsoft, microsoft internet explorer, operating system, real estate
  • Microsoft Vs Doj - 1,985 words
    Microsoft Vs. Doj Microsoft vs. DOJ Arguments of the DoJ (the white paper) 1. Microsoft and its Monopoly Power MS monopoly power is in personal computer operating systems. A PC operating system as you all know controls the interaction of the different parts of the computer. It creates files, organizes the computers memory and creates a platform for applications. The operating system is indispensible to the computer for this reason. Maybe that changes as technology evolves but right now a computer without an OS is nothing but a box of inert hardware. MS today ships 97% of PC OS that are installed by computer manufacturers. Case law defines monopoly as beginning at about a 70% share of the mar ...
    Related: microsoft, operating system, computer operating systems, netscape navigator, virtual
  • Oregon V Elstad - 1,798 words
    Oregon V Elstad OREGON v ELSTAD 470 U.S. 298, 105 S. Ct. 1285, 84 L.Ed. 2d 222 (1985) MERITS: Officers Burke and McAllister of the Polk County, Oregon Sheriff's office, on the basis of a witness' statement, obtained an arrest warrant for Michael Elstad, who was suspected of burglary. The officers went to Elstad's home and were escorted to his room by his mother. After instructing the respondent to dress and accompany them to the living room, Officer McAllister took Elstad's mother into the kitchen while Officer Burke stayed with the respondent. Without advising Elstad of his Miranda rights, Officer Burke asked him whether he was aware of the officer's reason for wanting to talk with him, and ...
    Related: oregon, oregon state, appeals court, due process, curb
  • Racially Biased Pretextual Traffic Stops - 1,824 words
    Racially Biased Pretextual Traffic Stops The interviews excerpted here show that racially biased pretextual traffic stops have a strong and immediate impact on the individual African-American drivers involved. These stops are not the minor inconveniences they might seem to those who are not subjected to them. Rather, they are experiences that can wound the soul and cause psychological scar tissue to form. And the statistics show that these experiences are not simply disconnected anecdotes or exaggerated versions of personal experiences, but rather established and persistent patterns of law enforcement conduct. It may be that these stops do not spring from racism on the part of individual off ...
    Related: traffic, racial profiling, criminal activity, crime control, minority
  • Racism - 1,234 words
    Racism Racism is defined by the Webster Dictionary as the assumption that the characteristics and abilities of an individual are determined by race and that one race is biologically superior to another. Confronted with a problem as complex as racism, we cannot afford to let ourselves be constrained by the boundaries of specific disciplines. Racism is alive and well. The reports of its demise are totally unfounded so that we come to the beginning of the twenty-first century, it remains as our society's major dilemma. There is a lot at stake when dealing with this issue, but that fact is that we cannot brush it aside or ignore it any longer because it is present in everything we do. Canada and ...
    Related: racism, catholic religion, urban institute, hiring process, equality
  • The Strengths And Weaknesses Of The American Political System - 1,363 words
    ... ced the reapportionment revolution in guaranteeing equal voting rights in 1962, he extended the exclusionary rule to the states in 1961, and in 1966, he sharply police interrogations of criminal suspects (O'Brien). These rulings gave him a mark in history as one of the great chief justices (O'Brien. Another Chief Justice included in this article is Burger who on the other hand proved to be a considerable disappointment for conservatives (O'Brien). Although he was a devoted Republican he, often times, voted on the liberal side. He was a friend of Warren who had an intrigue for court management. But his personality and prevented him from being decisive, and he was incapable of compromising ...
    Related: american, american people, american political, american politics, party system, political issues, political parties
  • Women In The Workforce - 1,610 words
    Women In The Workforce Western female thought through the centuries has identified the relationship between patriarchy and gender as crucial to the womens subordinate position. For two hundred years, patriarchy precluded women from having a legal or political identity and the legislation and attitudes supporting this provided the model for slavery. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries suffrage campaigners succeeded in securing some legal and political rights for women in the UK. By the middle of the 20th century, the emphasis had shifted from suffrage to social and economic equality in the public and private sphere and the womens movement that sprung up during the 1960s began to argue t ...
    Related: women in the workforce, workforce, social change, east germany, firstly
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