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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: evaporation

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  • Acid Rain - 1,289 words
    Acid Rain Pollution comes in various forms. Whether its toxic waste, CFCs, or sewage, they are all hazardous, to the earth. These can deplete the earth and its inhabitants of resources, causing a harmful change. A product of pollution is acid rain. We shall see that acidification is harmful to all forms of life. Acid rain is any form of precipitation that is polluted by sulphur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides (NOX). This acid precipitation can be in the form of rain, snow, sleet, fog, or cloud vapors. The acidity of substances dissolved in water are measured by their pH levels. Normal precipitation pH levels fall between 5.0-5.6.2 When levels fall below these numbers, then the precipitati ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, human activity, food supply
  • Acid Rains - 540 words
    Acid Rains Acid rain refers to all types of precipitation--rain, snow, sleet, hail, fog--that is acidic in nature. Acidic means that these forms of water have a pH lower than the 5.6 average of rainwater. Acid rain kills aquatic life, trees, crops and other vegetation, damages buildings and monuments, corrodes copper and lead piping, damages such man-made things as automobiles, reduces soil fertility and can cause toxic metals to leach into underground drinking water sources. Rain is naturally acidic because carbon dioxide, found normally in the earth's atmosphere, reacts with water to form carbonic acid. While "pure" rain's acidity is pH 5.6-5.7, actual pH readings vary from place to place ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, carbon dioxide, bodies of water, dioxide
  • Antoine Lavoisier 17431794 Antoinelaurent Lavoisier Lah Vwah Zyay Was One Of The - 879 words
    Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794) Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (lah vwah ZYAY) was one of the best-known French scientists and was an important government official. His theories of combustion, his development of a way to classify the elements and the first modern textbook of chemistry led to his being known as the father of modern chemistry. He contributed to much of the research in the field of chemistry. He is quoted for saying, Nothing is lost, nothing is created, everything is transformed. Lavoisier was born in Paris, France on Aug. 26, 1743. When he was eleven years old he attended a college called Mazain. For Lavoisier's last two years in college he found a great deal of interest in science. ...
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  • Ben Franklin - 1,759 words
    Ben Franklin Benjamin Franklin-Scientist and Inventor Benjamin Franklin has influenced American technology, and indirectly, lifestyles by using his proficiencies and intelligence to conduct numerous experiments, arrive at theories, and produce several inventions. Franklin's scientific and analytical mind enabled him to generate many long lasting achievements which contributed to the development and refinement of modern technology. Few national heroes, including George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, played a more significant role in shaping the American way of life than Franklin. According to Fowler, He personified the ideal of the self-made man, and his rise from obscurity to eminence exem ...
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  • Biomes Of The World - 1,092 words
    ... trees. The rain forest contains over 50% of worlds population in plants and animals. It covers roughly 5 billion acres of land. There are 3 layers of trees that can be found there. The first and most top layer is the emergent, which are widely spaced trees 100-120 ft tall with canopies above the general canopy of the forest. The second, middle layer is a closed canopy of 80-foot trees. Here light is available to this layer, but blocks out the light of lower lays. The third layer is a closed canopy of 60-foot trees. This is where little air movement occurs and there is high humidity. Another lower layer is the shrub/sapling layer. In this place of the forest less than 3% of light reaches ...
    Related: north america, south america, northern africa, tree, continuous
  • Black Holes - 1,516 words
    ... n in space. At this exact point in time, high amounts of radiation are given off, and with the proper equipment, can be detected and seen as an image of a black hole. Through this technique, astronomers now believe that they have found a black hole known as Centaurus A. The existence of a star apparently absorbing nothingness led astronomers to suggest and confirm the existence of another black hole, Cygnus X1. By emitting gravitational waves, non-stationary black holes lose energy, eventually becoming stationary and ceasing to radiate in this manner. In other words, they decay and become stationary black holes, namely holes that are perfectly spherical or whose rotation is perfectly uni ...
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  • Black Holes - 753 words
    Black Holes Within our galaxy alone, there are millions upon millions of stars. Within our universe, there are millions upon millions of galaxies. Humans have known the existence of stars since they have had eyes. Although interpretations may have differed on what they were, they were always thought of as white glowing specks in the sky, but the mystery does not lie within what we can see, but what we can not see. There are billions of stars lighting the darkness of our universe, but the question lies in what happens when one of these enormous lamps burns out. Upon many speculations, one of the most fascinating is the black hole theory. Not any star can become a Black Hole. For instance, the ...
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  • Black Holes As Future Power Plants - 1,996 words
    Black Holes As Future Power Plants Black Holes: The Power Source for Future Space Travel? Ryan Weaver University of Alaska Anchorage Everyone knows that the spaceships in Star Trek that travel faster than the speed of light are mere science fiction. According to Einstein's theory of relativity, if an object reached the speed of light, its mass would be immediately transformed into energy. Currently our spaceships can not even reach mars in less than five years. Now, with modern theories of black holes, trips to other solar systems may be possible at nearly the speed of light. Black holes were only proven to exist within the last twenty-five years and were only really considered to exist for ...
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  • California Water - 1,385 words
    California Water What do we use all this water for? Of all the water that falls to California, 60% is immediately returned to the atmosphere by evaporation or native plant use. The rest runs off into rivers, lakes, streams and the water table, where it is available for human use. We will explain what happens to all this water, show exactly how much water we do use, and give ways to reduce water use in and around your home. The single largest user of water is industry. Industries use 46% of our annual water supply. One industrial use is manufacturing, in various ways such as cooling of materials, washing of materials, products, tools, and equipment. For example, by the time a Sunday paper get ...
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  • Changes Of Matter State - 1,344 words
    Changes Of Matter State To define matter, one would say that it is something that occupies space and has weight. Matter naturally occurs in three phases: solid, liquid, and gas. Changing from a solid to a liquid, liquid to gas, etc. can be referred to as a change of state. Changes of state (or phase) effect our everyday lives. This chapter on changes of phase should actually be called Energy Transfer. The whole basis on changing a substance's state is that it is using energy to get from one state to another. To understand the "real" difference in the phases of matter, you must understand the difference in the energy of the phases. Energy is found inside matter. You can think of this energy a ...
    Related: physical change, kinetic energy, atmospheric pressure, different levels, stick
  • Chemistry Research - 2,121 words
    Chemistry Research CHAPTER 32 The tallest tree is the Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) approx 110 m The tallest Angiosperm is the Australian Eucalyptus regnans Water Uptake and transport (Fig. 32.1) = water is essential because: transport solute, cool the body, photosynthesis and Turgor pressure Osmosis- movement of H2) through a semi-impermeable membrane Osmotic potential ( o)-depend on dissolve solute: Hi concentration means more negative o. Isoosmotic-two solution with same o; Hypoosmotic- solution that has a less negative o(more +) Turgor Pressure -hydraulic pressure result from water up take, cell turgid; analog to air pressure in a tire Water Potential ( )-Overall tendency of a solution ...
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  • Clean Air Act - 1,133 words
    Clean Air Act 1990, the federal Clean Air Act was passed to improve air quality in the United States. President Bush's proposed amendments to the Clean Air Act initially would have led to the introduction of alternative, non-petroleum fuels. The petroleum and oxygenate industries responded by offering a reformulated gasoline program as a substitute for most of the alternate fuel proposals. As a result, the amendments to the federal Clean Air Act adopted in 1990 required steps to achieve lower vehicle emissions, including programs to oxygenate and reformulate gasoline. Oxygenated gasoline is designed to increase the combustion efficiency of gasoline, thereby reducing carbon monoxide emissions ...
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  • Climate - 767 words
    Climate In order to investigate the effects of geography on climate, I selected two cities, both on the same continent, both at approximately the same latitude, and both on major bodies of water. I compared the monthly temperature and precipitation averages of New York City with the monthly temperature and precipitation averages of San Francisco. I also recorded the daily temperatures of the two cities over the course of three months. What I found is reflected in this report. New York City and San Francisco are very similar. New York is at 38 north latitude and San Francisco is located at 41 north Latitude. Each borders an ocean. New York is on the east coast of the United States, on the Atl ...
    Related: climate, atlantic ocean, bodies of water, air temperature, drop
  • Clouded Atmosphere - 1,110 words
    Clouded Atmosphere Clouded Atmosphere The concentration of the atmosphere's main greenhouse gases specifically, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and water vapor, have increased significantly during the industrial age. These high concentrations are predicted to continue in the atmosphere for thousands of years to come. This increase in specially carbon dioxide, increases the infrared energy taken in by the atmosphere, and warming the earth's surface. The Global mean temperature over the past 150 years has risen between 0.3 degrees C and 0.6 degrees C. Climate changes that have been predicted are based on the continual rise in Green House Gases. These changes include changes in: increas ...
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  • Cryogenics - 1,034 words
    Cryogenics Cryogenics is a largely growing field, relatively innovative in the field of science and research. It deals with freezing temperatures below - 150 degrees Celsius (-238 degrees Fahrenheit) using oxygen, helium I, helium II (which are both are chemically identical), and nitrogen. These are cooled to the point of liquidation and used to freeze diverse materials and substances. "At these extreme conditions, such properties of materials as strength, thermal conductivity, ductility and electrical resistance are altered ... materials at cryogenic temperatures are as close to a static and highly ordered state as possible." Cryogenics is more than the term for freezing, but more precisely ...
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  • Crystals - 1,487 words
    Crystals Crystals What is a crystal? A crystal is a solid substance with definite geometric shapes and molecules that are arranged in a repeating pattern (Comptons ). Crystals have fixed angles between its faces, which have distinct edges. If the faces of a crystal can reflect light, then it will sparkle (Stangle). Crystals have constant angles because of the regular arrangement of its particles. There are seven types of crystals: cubic, tetragonal, orthorhombic, hexagonal, trigonal, monoclinic, and triclinic (Dr. Boyle). Crystals are classified by the shapes of their lattice or the regular, periodic configuration of particles (American Heritage). There are two different types of lattices. T ...
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  • Desertification - 1,164 words
    Desertification Desertification is the spread of desert-like conditions in arid and semi-arid areas, due to human influence and/or climatic change. Some of the natural causes of desertification are wind erosion, climatic conditions, and scarce water supply. There is a grave difference between areas where vegetation has been retained and surrounding vegetation. For example, "Nefta in southern Tunisia, the coverage of vegetation inside an area fenced 60 years ago is 85%, in contrast to 5% outside the area." Approximately one-third of the earth's land surface is semi-arid or arid. This is the land where desertification occurs; not in any of the natural desert zones. "Were these lands to continu ...
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  • Deserts - 357 words
    Deserts A desert is an area defined by it has less than 50 cm of precipitation annually. Not all deserts are dry and sandy.Most of the worlds deserts tend to lie between 20 degrees to 30 degrees north and south latitude. North Africa, south western North America, the Middle East, and Australia support the largest deserts, but there are smaller deserts in other regions. Overall deserts cover one fifth of the earths surface.Hot desert climates are hot and dry, with high temperatures, usually around the 45 degrees Celsius mark which inturn with the low rainfall makes life in the desert very hard to support. At night the temperature can drop to around 18 degrees Celsius. With the hot deserts hig ...
    Related: deserts, north africa, south western, surface area, evaporation
  • During The 1920s, A Biologist Named Jean Piaget Proposed A Theory Of Cognitive Development Of Children He Caused A New Revolu - 1,646 words
    During the 1920s, a biologist named Jean Piaget proposed a theory of cognitive development of children. He caused a new revolution in thinking about how thinking develops. In 1984, Piaget observed that children understand concepts and reason differently at different stages. Piaget stated children's cognitive strategies which are used to solve problems, reflect an interaction BETWEEN THE CHILD'S CURRENT DEVELOPMENTAL STAGE AND experience in the world. Research on cognitive development has provided science educators with constructive information regarding student capacities for meeting science curricular goals. Students which demonstrate concrete operational thinking on Piagetian tasks seem to ...
    Related: cognitive, cognitive development, jean, jean piaget, piaget
  • Environmental Effects Of Global Warming - 1,713 words
    Environmental Effects Of Global Warming Environmental Effects of Global Warming The greenhouse effect and global warming are issues that are talked about by geologists all the time. The greenhouse effect is a natural process that keeps the earth at temperatures that are livable. Energy from the sun warms the earth when its heat rays are absorbed by greenhouse gasses and become trapped in the atmosphere. Some of the most common greenhouse gasses are water vapor, carbon dioxide, and methane. If there were no greenhouse gasses, very few rays would be absorbed and the earth would be extremely cold. When too many rays are absorbed, the earth's atmosphere starts to warm, which leads to global warm ...
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